Mercedes SL63 AMG vs BMW M6 - Auto Express

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New Audi A6 vs Mercedes E-Class vs BMW 5 Series - Auto Express
Full group test: http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/videos/featuresvideos/26724/audi_a6_vs_rivals. html#ixzz1LIqwRaki The new Audi A6 has barged it's way into the company car park and is determined to stay, but can it live up to the hype and fend off the competition of its premium German rivals? To find out, Auto Express has grabbed the keys and tested it face-to-face with traditonal rivals the Mercedes E-Class and last-year's class-winning BMW 520d.





New Mercedes S-Class vs Audi A8 vs Range Rover - Auto Express
Mercedes S-Class vs Audi A8 vs Range Rover full review: http://bit.ly/17fG17C Mercedes S-Class review: http://bit.ly/16kkEfg Subscribe to our YouTube channel http://bit.ly/11Ad1j1 Subscribe to the mag http://subscribe.autoexpress.co.uk/yt Ever since the first Mercedes S-Class arrived in 1972 it has dominated the Luxury car sector -- until the excellent Range Rover came along recently. So can this new one regain its crown? The Range Rover sets the benchmark for the Mercedes to beat. And starting at around £70,000, this TDV6 Vogue is our pick of the range. By comparison the long wheelbase A8 3.0-litre TDI SE seems a bit of a bargain. At less than £64,000 it's the least expensive car here. The Mercedes S350 L SE costs two thousand pounds more than the Audi, but the S-Class is undoubtedly the most luxurious. The Range Rover comes and impressive second though, with the A8 third. The S-Class is offered with range of seating options. This one has the £4000 Executive Seat package but can pay even more to make them recline up to 43.5 degrees -- that's more than in any other car. The Audi doesn't have such versatile seats but in the back it's no less spacious than the Mercedes. It may be big on the outside but the Range Rover has 80mm less rear legroom than the two Germans. Bearing in mind that these cars are comfy cruisers, the Mercedes is the best to drive, followed by the Range Rover and finally the Audi -- on account of its sporty edge. Both the Audi A8 and the Range Rover are gadget-laden. You can get posh stereos, high tech screens, surround cameras and huge sunroofs in those cars, but being the newest the Mercedes has an advantage. It gets the latest displays, most advanced nigh vision system and even hot stone massage seats. So the S-Class leads the field for technology as well as being the most luxurious plus the best to drive and to be driven in. But there's just one last thing we need to consider. The S-Class's boot capacity is a respectable 510-litres, which is the same as the Audi A8. However, the Range Rover has a 909-litre capacity and, with the seats folded, can swallow 2,030 litres. That means the Range Rover is the most practical and overall it's a better luxury car than the Audi A8. The thing is though, the Mercedes S-Class is even better.





BMW M6 Gran Coupe vs Audi RS7 - Auto Express
BMW M6 Gran Coupe review: http://bit.ly/INJFcP Audi RS7 review: http://bit.ly/1bU3Tif Subscribe to our YouTube channel http://bit.ly/11Ad1j1 Subscribe to the mag http://subscribe.autoexpress.co.uk/yt This is the new Audi RS7 and its arch-rival, the BMW M6 Gran Coupe. Both are powered by turbocharged V8 engines and have over 500bhp -but do they really justify their nearly £100,000 price tags? Watch our video review to find out. The BMW M6 costs just under £98,000 and features a 4.4-litre twin-turbo V8 with 552bhp and 680Nm of torque. It'll sprint from 0-60 in just 4.2 seconds before hitting a limited top speed of 155mph. The Audi has a 4.0-litre twin-turbo V8 yet despite being down on capacity compared to the BMW it produces the same bhp and has even more torque with a huge 700Nm. Once again top speed is limited to 155mph, but it hits 60 in just 3.9 seconds. So, what's the Audi like to drive? Well, the first thing is that it's so hard to use the performance on the road - it's just so fast that it's impossible to put it into use. The one thing the Audi does have is quattro all-wheel drive and a clever sport differential - that means it doesn't have any of the traction issues that you get in the M6, and it doesn't work it's stability control as hard. There's lots of grip, but the problem is it's just a bit inert - there's not a lot of feel in the steering. Also, the suspension is a bit odd. The ride isn't great - in fact it's pretty awful - and all in all it's not a particularly engaging car despite its speed. It's quite hard to love this car despite the fact that the engine is so great. So how does the BMW compare? If anything the BMW engine has a little bit more character than the Audi engine and there's certainly more fizz to the driving experience. It's not perfect and it troubles the traction control quite a lot on a wet road, though. The biggest problem for this car in a way, though isn't the Audi - it's the M6's sister car, the M5. This car is substantially more expensive than the M5 - about £25,000 more than an M5 - and it doesn't offer a huge amount more in terms of driving. So the BMW is the best to drive but it's also the nicest to sit in, with its stylish interior and sporty wrap-around cockpit. The Audi's still feels posh and is loaded with gadgets but it lacks the BMW's wow factor. However with its hatchback boot the Audi is the more practical of the pair. It might cost a lot more money than the BMW M5 but we'd go for the M6 Gran Coupe - it looks great, sounds fantastic and most importantly it's more fun to drive than the Audi RS7.





Lamborghini Huracan review
The Lamborghini Huracan is a glorious fusion of modern technology and old-school Lamborghini theatrics. Read the full review here: http://bit.ly/1q9R6iW Subscribe to our YouTube channel http://bit.ly/11Ad1j1 Subscribe to the mag http://subscribe.autoexpress.co.uk/yt The new Lamborghini Huracan LP6104 has a big task on its hands. Not only must it beat the Ferrari 458 and the McLaren 650S, it needs to outperform the Gallardo - the car it replaced - in the showroom, as the Gallardo was the manufacturer's best-selling model ever, with 14,000 sold over a 10-year career. Happily, the Lamborghini Huracan gets off to the best possible start. Perhaps the design is a little conservative by Lamborghini's standards, but in the flesh, the aggressive proportions, aggressive front end and floating C-Pillar push all the right buttons. Like in the Lamborghini Aventador, the interior of the Huracan pays homage to fighter jets, with a flip-up ignition switch, angles everywhere and a new cockpit-like 12.3-inch digital instrument display behind the wheel that can be configured in a variety of ways. The Lamborghini Huracan also gets a whole range of brand-new technologies. For starters, there's this all new chassis which is made from a combination of aluminium and carbon fibre. This makes the Huracan not only 10 per cent lighter than the Gallardo, but also 50 per cent stiffer. There are also new three-stage adaptive dampers, as well as a variable ratio electro-mechanical steering system that varies the ratio on how quick you're driving. A new electronically controlled four-wheel drive system can send up to 70 per cent of the power to the Huracan's rear-wheels in normal driving, and up to 100 per cent when you really need it. Most importantly on the new Lamborghini Huracan, though, is a new, seven-speed twin-clutch box that shouldn't feel like you're getting kicked in the head every time you change gear. Rather than downsizing or turbocharging, Lamborghini has stuck to its guns by using a developed version of the Gallardo's naturally aspirated 5.2-litre V10. The Lamborghini Huracan gets stop-start and a few other tweaks to make it a little bit cleaner, but most importantly, it's now got 602bhp and 560Nm of torque. It'll do 0-60 in 3.2 seconds and it has a top-speed of 202mph. The Lamborghini Huracan's acceleration is pretty vivid. Perhaps it doesn't quite have the free-revving nature of a Ferrari 458 or the turbocharged hit of a McLaren 650S, but it's definitely lost none of the aural drama that the Gallardo had. The biggest change here with the Lamborghini Huracan, though, is its breadth of abilities. It has something called the 'Anima' switch, meaning it has three driving modes. In 'Strada' mode, it softens the suspension and dials back the ferocity of the steering, the gearbox and the throttle. 'Sport' mode is somewhat of an interim mode and it's pretty good for fast-driving on road. But since we're testing the Lamborghini Huracan at the amazing Ascari circuit in Spain, it would be a shame if we didn't go for the full-fat 'Corsa' mode. Fling it into a corner and the steering is quite light, but it's absolutely pin-sharp. In terms of feel, it's a bit like a Ferrari 458 and you can feel the variable ratio really helping you out, meaning there's no full-opposite lock. The carbon ceramic brakes on the Lamborghini Huracan are standard-fit now, and they're absolutely brutal in the way they stop the car. With the four-wheel drive system, there's also tonnes of grip. However, if you provoke the Huracan a bit, you can get it to act a bit like a rear-wheel drive car. Perhaps it's not as lairy as the Gallardo used to be - that used to like to gets its tail out at the slightest provocation - but you can still have some fun with this thing and feel it moving underneath you. The tech used in the Huracan can also make a pretty average driver look pretty spectacular. The question is though, is do you actually want a Lamborghini that flatters you and covers up all your driving mistakes? Some will say that a Lamborghini should scare the life out of you and your passenger. Then it should spit you into a hedge when you're not at the top of your game. But, we'd disagree because the new Huracan is a glorious fusion of modern electronics and old-school theatrics. If you want something that drives like a pig and breaks-down every five minutes, you can always take your £186,000 and spend it on something from Lamborghini's back catalogue.




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