1978 DATSUN B210 INCREDIBLE SURVIVOR

Just to set the record straight, the "It happened in 1978" website was wrong and I failed to double-check them. Too late to re-script the entire video. So, once and for all... According to Wikipedia and several additional sources it was actually 1976 when the album Hotel California was released NOT 1978 See a FULL SCREEN PHOTO image at this link: http://www.jims59.com/78Datsun/images/DatLtFrt17Jun08.jpg Our 1978 Datsun B210 with 19,600 actual miles. (31,500km) It has been garaged it's entire life. It has never been winter driven, and has seldom seen rain... No smoking ever. This car is not restored, it has never had any paint work of any kind. The body and interior are almost perfect. The engine compartment has not been detailed. The car is kept in climate control and only driven a few times each year to car shows. It has an EPA-mpg rating of 28 city and 41 highway! It is powered by a 1.4 liter 4-cylinder engine with a 4-speed manual transmission. To see more you may visit THIS DATSUN'S WEB PAGE at this url: http://www.jims59.com/78Datsun/index.html Thank you for viewing my video. My apologies for poor quality as I am not a professional film maker.

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1976 datsun first start in over 20 years





1979 Datsun 210 (Car Spotting for WasabiCars)
http://wasabicars.com Found this rusty little daily driver in my school's parking lot. RSS: http://feeds.feedburner.com/TheWasabicarsFeed Twitter: https://twitter.com/wasabicars Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/WasabiCars





Datsun B210
Restored 1978 Datsun B210 by Wayne Burgsma.





Datsun History 1930s to 1970s
Datsun is an automobile brand owned by Nissan. Datsun's original production run began in 1931. From 1958 to 1986, only vehicles exported by Nissan were identified as Datsun. In 1986, Nissan phased out the Datsun name but re-launched it in 2013 as the brand for low-cost vehicles manufactured for emerging markets. In 1931, Dat Motorcar Co. chose to name its new small car "Datson", a name which indicated the new car's smaller size when compared to the DAT's larger vehicle already in production. When Nissan took control of DAT in 1934, the name "Datson" was changed to "Datsun", because "son" also means "loss" (損 Son) in Japanese and also to honor the sun depicted in the national flag.[1] Nissan phased out the Datsun brand in March 1986. The Datsun name is most famous for the 510, Fairlady roadsters, and later the Fairlady (240Z) coupes. Datsun entered the American market in 1958, with sales in California.[15] By 1959, the company had dealers across the U.S.[15] and began selling the 310 (known as Bluebird domestically).[15] From 1962 to 1969 the Nissan Patrol utility vehicle was sold in the United States (as a competitor to the Toyota Land Cruiser J40 series), making it the only Nissan-badged product sold in the USA prior to that name's introduction worldwide decades later. From 1960 on, exports and production continued to grow. A new plant was built at Oppama, south of Yokohama; it opened in 1962. The next year, Bluebird sales first topped 200,000, and exports touched 100,000.[15] By 1964, Bluebird was being built at 10,000 cars a month.[15] For 1966, Datsun debuted the 1000, allowing owners of 360 cc (22 cu in) kei cars to move up to something bigger.[15] That same year, Datsun won the East African Safari Rally and merged with Prince Motors, giving the company the Skyline model range, as well as a test track at Murayama.[15] The company introduced the Bluebird 510 in 1967.[15] This was followed in 1968 with the iconic 240Z, which proved affordable sports cars could be built and sold profitably: it was soon the world's #1-selling sports car.[16] It relied on an engine based on the Bluebird and used Bluebird suspension components.[17] It would go on to two outright wins in the East African Rally.[17] Katayama was made Vice President of the Nissan North American subsidiary in 1960, and as long as he was involved in decision making, both as North American Vice President from 1960 to 1965, and then President of Nissan Motor Company U.S.A. from 1965 to 1975, the cars were sold as Datsuns. “What we need to do is improve our car’s efficiency gradually and creep up slowly before others notice. Then, before Detroit realizes it, we will have become an excellent car maker, and the customers will think so too. If we work hard to sell our own cars, we won’t be bothered by whatever the other manufacturers do. If all we do is worry about the other cars in the race, we will definitely lose. S321




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