2008 Altima 2.5 SL CVT 0-60 (Manual mode)

0-60 run, CVT transmission set to Manual mode. I let the car shift itself since I'm holding the camera. Link to 0-60 in Automatic (CVT) mode: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OV4HD1gsw_M I want to let everyone know that this video does demonstrate how the car accelerates at full throttle in manual mode. There's a weird anomaly that shows up when accelerating with the engine under around 3000 RPM. The tacometer doesn't shoot up in a linear form like most automatic transmissions. Instead, acceleration builds until it gets over 3000 RPM, and then you get a burst of power through the engine's 6000 RPM redline. I've only got a couple of theories as to why this might happen in this mode. 1. To keep the CVT chain from slipping, power is limited until 3000 RPM, thus creating a "lag" effect. At 3000 RPM, the engine and CVT have enough motion/grip to keep the chain from slipping, so the engine reigns in full power until redline. 2. The engine does not have adequate power in its low end rev range. Because of the way the engine is tuned, all of the power is made above 3000RPM's. Those are my ideas. What do you guys think? (Post them in comments.)

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