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Fiero clutch replacement time lapse

A time lapse video of my friend Aaron and I replacing the clutch and engine mounts in my 1986 Pontiac Fiero SE V6.


 


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How to Remove a 2.8 V6 Engine from a Pontiac FIero step-by-step (HD)
This is a video giving a visual step-by-step process on how to remove the 2.8 liter V6 engine from a Pontiac Fiero using basic tools. The only tools that you may need to rent, borrow or buy is an engine hoist and some 4 wheel moving dolly's. I've attempted to make this video as visual as possible so that anyone could see how to remove the engine using basic tools. This video can also be a useful guide when reinstalling the engine as is shows how things were disconnected. Most of the disassembly steps can be done in any order with the exception of a few parts. Please comment and share with other Fiero enthusiasts. If I do not know how to do something, I usually turn to YouTube FIRST to see if there is a video on it. Since I use YouTube to teach me things I figured I'd pay it forward and post videos of what I know.





My '84 Fiero (Bought It New, Had It Ever Since)
Its on-again, off-again development took 6 years before it finally saw the light of day. Like almost every inexpensive sports car through history, it used numerous components from high-volume production cars to keep costs down. Pontiac's crack marketing department predicted total sales of 60,000 that first year. Imagine their surprise when 30,000 people placed orders for the car sight unseen. By the time of its official introduction in September of 1983, there was a six-month waiting list. By model-year's end, 136,840 Fieros had flowed out the doors of its Pontiac, MI assembly plant, a record for any mid-engined car. It was chosen as the Pace Car for the Indianapolis 500 that year, powered by a Pontiac 2.7L Super Duty 4 making 232 h.p. The 2000 Pace Car replicas sold to the public had the standard 92 h.p. Iron Duke 4. Its Enduraflex body panels, bolted to a driveable space frame, never dented and never rusted. The lower door and fender panels would even bounce back from minor impacts. What GM learned about these body panels with the Fiero was applied to its first-generation minivans and its Saturn line of small cars. This one was my first, and only new car. 29 years (as of April 9, 2013), 165,000 miles, (27,000 miles on this engine), two owners (for the first four years, the bank owned it. LOL). I ordered it in October 1983 from Townsend Pontiac in Merrillville, IN; it finally came in April 1984. Mine is a Sport Coupe (the middle model), red with a gray interior and alloy wheels, and looks exactly like the Fieros Pontiac used in their print and TV advertising in '84. For this model year only, the engine cover grille was cast magnesium. The rear trunk held 5 upright sacks of groceries, the front compartment two more. (You listening, Solstice?) It went 50,000 miles the first 3 years, thanks to a long daily commute; it took eight years to go the next 50,000. It took another 14 years after that to get to 140,000+ miles. Not that it had an easy life, being a daily driver in Chicago winters, where they throw salt on the street if a snow cloud passes overhead (notice I didn't say it actually had to snow.) It's a 30-footer; from that distance, it could pass for new. As you get closer, you notice the stone chips, the clearcoat peeling off the wheels, the ripped driver's seat, and the swirl marks in the paint. But then, if any of you look like you did 26 years ago, raise your hands. Those of you who weren't even born 26 years ago can recuse yourselves. It's on its second hood medallion; the first and only time I left the car parked outside my house overnight in 1987, someone tried to pry the first one off, and nearly succeeded. This is its second clutch and its second set of headlight motors, and its third set of tires (Eagle GT2's -- Goodyear no longer makes 215/60R14 tires, so my next set will have to be BF Goodrich). The old Iron Duke had to be replaced at 138,500 miles; with the new Duke, rebuilt by ATK, it's even faster than it was when new. The 4-speed has gone all the way Other than that, it's original and bone stock, an increasing rare commodity in the Fiero world of turbo-V6 and small-block V8 engine swaps and one-off wheels, bodies and colors. The only real problem I've had with this car is crappy repairs by mechanics, both dealer and independent, who shouldn't have been allowed to change a trunk light by themselves. The Recall was the worst. The mechanics at my friendly local Pontiac dealer would loosen parts to get to other parts and forget to tighten them back, causing a noticeable rattle (hardly the car's fault) and refused to take responsibility for their shoddy work; I ended up tightening those parts back myself. After 16 years of these kinds of repairs, through my local Fiero club, Northern Illinois Fiero Enthusiasts, I finally found a dealer mechanic, Dave Armstrong, who knew what the hell he was doing; he's the reason my car is still on the road. I found out from him that even when Fieros were still being made, it was OPTIONAL for Pontiac mechanics to be trained to work on them. If you brought your Fiero in for service, it was strictly luck whether you got a qualified technician (like Dave)or a clueless hack. A possible consequence of getting a dealer hack, going to an independent mechanic or doing a backyard DIY repair? If the Fiero's cooling system was not flushed and refilled according to a specific procedure (clearly outlined in the owner's manual and, I would imagine, the dealer shop manual), the car ended up with HALF the antifreeze/coolant it was designed to hold. And there were engine fires? Gee, I wonder why. Dave was the go-to Fiero guru at Jacobs Twin Pontiac in Chicago; now he's got his own garage near Harlem and Irving Park, doing a land-office business. It couldn't happen to a more deserving guy. He'll get your Fiero (or any other GM car) running right. Contact him at 773-282-1444.





My EV. 85 Fiero Converted in to a Electric vehicle.
My 100% electric 85 Fiero. Click on the link to my blog to read more.





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Performance Clutch - Explained
What is a performance clutch? Clutch kit? How does a performance clutch work? A performance clutch basically involves three changes over traditional organic clutches. This video features a Yonaka performance clutch kit. A performance clutch has a higher clamping force on the pressure plate (via the diaphragm spring). Performance clutches use different materials which can absorb less heat and that don't lose performance at higher temperatures. Finally, performance clutches use a "puck" design, 3 puck, 4 puck, 6 puck, which increase the pressure on the friction material, to prevent slip. Product Links: Performance Clutch Kit: http://www.yonaka.com/Yonaka_Honda_B16_B18_6_Puck_Performance_Clutch_Set_p/ ympck001.htm Yonaka: http://www.yonaka.com/ Related Videos: Clutches - http://youtu.be/pJj8NvDUSFs Multi-Plate Clutches - http://youtu.be/SQvFg4WbdZ4 Please feel free to rate, comment, and subscribe! And don't forget to check out my Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/engineeringexplained Also check out my official website: Make suggestions, participate in forums, learn through logically ordered lessons, read FAQs, and plan your future! http://www.howdoesacarwork.com Now on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/jasonfenske13 NEW VIDEO EVERY WEDNESDAY!





Fiero electric motor transaxle first test
This is a major milestone in my 1986 Pontiac Fiero electric car conversion project. After numerous delays getting the correct adapting hardware for the new motor to the old transaxle, we finally mounted the clutch and motor assembly onto the transaxle and frame of the car. With everything in place, I applied a regular 12 car battery to the motor and amazingly, it ran without a hitch! See my website (www.roboticmayhem.com) for more information on this project.





Before replacing your car's clutch, check the master / slave cylinder. Could Save Big $$.
Before replacing your car's clutch, check the master / slave cylinder. Could Save Big $$. On the way to work one day I noticed that my clutch pedal was softer than usual. Over time, the clutch pedal got softer, spongier, and it was harder to shift gears. The clutch would engage or disengage about 4 inches off the floor, then it was 3 inches, then 2 inches, finally 1 off the floor and I couldn't shift into first gear and all the other gears were very tight and there was some grinding. My first thought was that I was going to have to spend at least 450 bucks to replace the clutch, pressure plate, throw out bearing. Basically, all the things that you'd need replace for a clutch job. After some thought and research, I realized it was either the clutch slave or clutch master cylinder. Here's why- When I was able to shift gears, there was NO slipping, grinding, whining, and the gears shifted easily. If you have slipping, grinding, whining and the it's hard to get into gear, you may need a clutch. Provided your clutch pedal is acting like usual. But you should check fluid levels in the clutch master / slave cylinders. If the fluid is low add some to it, look for leaks. If you add fluid and it goes away, chances are you have a leak. That may be the cause of your problem. It is possible that you may have to adjust the clutch cable. That wasn't the case for me. The cable was fine and still tight. I've been pretty vague on actual specifics in this video. It's more for general information. Or really basic troubleshooting. It's something to check before you commit to a new clutch.. My repair was 30 bucks, Not 450 Bucks! Very happy about that! Anybody else ever replaced a clutch master / slave cylinder? ______________________________________ Home: http://www.cheapgeek.net Twitter: http://twitter.com/Cheap__Geek Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/cheapgeek1/




Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?





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1984 Pontiac Fiero : 9.744 @ 135.664
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1984 Pontiac Fiero 2M4: 9.898 @ 134.420
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1987 Pontiac Fiero : 12.920 @ 109.000
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1986 Pontiac Fiero GT: 13.533 @ 101.370
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1987 Pontiac Fiero GT: 14.249 @ 96.960
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1985 Pontiac Fiero GT: 14.478 @ 95.630
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1987 Pontiac Fiero GT: 14.500 @ 94.000
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1988 Pontiac Fiero GT: 14.870 @ 93.000
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