Drag Racing 1/4 Mile times 0-60 Dyno Fast Cars Muscle Cars

Grand Prix´s 1937

Rennaufnahmen von 1937


 


More Videos...


F1 - 1959 Avus GP - Hans Hermann accident
The simplistic track consisted of a very fast straight down either side of a dual carriageway, punctuated at one end by a hairpin and at the other by a steep banking. Also uniquely in Formula One World Championship history, the race was divided into two heats. In the first, Tony Brooks and Dan Gurney took the lead. Masten Gregory in the Cooper-Climax battled hard with them, passing first one Ferrari then the other as the lead changed hands until a big end bolt broke. It was a Ferrari 1-2-3 with Phil Hill taking the final podium place. In the second heat, once again the Ferraris had a duel at the front, this time with Bruce McLaren until he suffered transfer gear problems. On aggregate placings, it was an all-Ferrari podium in the order Brooks, Gurney, Hill. Maurice Trintignant was fourth from Jo Bonnier and Ian Burgess. This was the fastest Formula One race recorded at this time, with an average speed of 143.3 miles per hour. Hans Herrmann crashed his BRM P25 five laps into the second heat. Former Ferrari driver Frenchman Jean Behra was due to race his Behra-Porsche Special in the Grand Prix but Behra was killed the day before racing a Porsche RSK in the Formula 2 support race at the same venue. The results show evidence of the inconsistency with which rules were applied in this era. According to Formula One rules of the day, those drivers who retired before the end of the Grand Prix should only be classified if they pushed the car over the line after the finish. This rule was not applied to Harry Schell, who retired some 11 laps before the end. However, the rule was applied in other races, such as the 1960 Belgian Grand Prix. The rules were later clarified in 1966. Brooks win allowed him to close to within four points of championship leader, Australian Cooper racer Jack Brabham.





Supercharged Grand Prix Cars 1924-1939 (full version)
Believe it or not.... Supercharged Grand Prix cars of 1924-1939 full documentary





Hitlers Rennschlachten Wie Die Silberpfeile Siegen Lernten Teil 4
Hitlers Rennschlachten Wie Die Silberpfeile Siegen Lernten Teil 4





Jim Clark's fatal accident.
Jim Clark's death during a F2 race in Hockenheim in 1968. R.I.P. Jimmy!





Auto Union and Mercedes W165 engine starts, LOUD!
Goodwood Festival of Speed FOS 2011, Auto Union Type C & D and Mercedes W165 engine starts. Awesome sounds, very loud! Auto Union drivers: Nick Mason and Hans-Joachim Stuck. Mercedes Silver Arrow W165 Chassis 449547 was the second of the two W165s completed for the 1939 Tripoli Grand Prix. It was considered the slower of the two cars and Lang was sent out in it with an unfavourable strategy. He nevertheless dominated the race and if he had wanted, he could have lapped his 'team leader' in the closing stages. As mentioned the car was only tested and demonstrated after its debut victory. It remained dormant for over fifty years and is still only very rarely seen outside of Stuttgart. Celebrating the 75th anniversary of the 'Silver Arrows,' it is seen here at one of those rare outings, during the 2009 Retromobile in Paris. Auto Union Type C Mercedes-Benz domination in Grand Prix ended with the Auto Union Typ C. It took a few years to get it right, but Ferdinand Porsche's daring design with a mid-mounted V16 finally won. It claimed many victories from 1936 to 1938 until the three-liter formula was laid out for 1939. Horch, Audi, DKW and Wanderer created Auto Union with the help of Ferdinand Porsche and Adolf Rosenberger. Along with building passenger cars, a goal of the new company was to enter Grand Prix. They did so in 1934 with a daring mid-engined race car called the Typ A. This evolved into the slightly larger Typ B the following year and the Typ C was fitted with a much larger engine for 1936. The Type-C was a third evolution of Auto Union's racecar. It primarily competed with Mercedes-Benz but also raced against Alfa Romeo's 12C-36, the Maserati V8RI and Bugatti 59/50. Type-Cs won six victories in 1936 and made Bernt Rosermeyer world champion





Grand Prix´s 1934
Rennaufnahmen von 1934





Auto Union Typ C Dokumentation
Was für ein Sound..... Doku über den Typ C anlässlich des Hamburger Stadtparkrennens





Grand Prix de Avus 1959
Imagenes del Gran premio de Alemania celebrado en la carretera de Avus, en Berlin Pole: Tony Brooks, 237.331 km/h 1- Tony brooks...........Ferrari 2- Dan Gurney............Ferrari 3- Phil Hill.............Ferrari 4- Maurice Trintignant...Cooper-Climax 5- Jo Bonnier............BRM 6- Ian Burguess..........CooperMaserati 7- harry Schell..........BRM RV: Tony Brooks, 240 km/H ....Jeah Behra R.I.P. ....





Hitlers Rennschlachten Wie Die Silberpfeile Siegen Lernten Teil 1
Hitlers Rennschlachten Wie Die Silberpfeile Siegen Lernten Teil 1





Grand Prix´s 1938 Teil 1
Rennaufnahmen von 1938





Nürburgring - Hermann Lang
In 1962 Hermann Lang came back to the Nürburgring to drive his Mercedes W125 Grand Prix car again. The 1937 Mercedes W125 Data: 8-Cylinder In-line 5,660 CC 646 bhp at 5,800 rpm (The most powerfull gp car ever built up until the late seventies)





1967 F1 Spa Francorchamps - Mike Parkes Crash





1906 french grand prix
1906 french grand prix





Tripoli Grand Prix 1937 سباق الملاحة
The Tripoli Grand Prix was a motor racing event first held in 1925 on a racing circuit outside Tripoli, the capital of what was then Italian Tripolitania. Motor racing was an extremely popular sport in Italy and the colony was seeking methods to raise capital and promote tourism -- tourists who, it was hoped, would then decide to settle in Tripolitania. But despite the support of the colony's extremely enthusiastic governor, Emilio de Bono, and some initial success, the events failed financially. Only personal intervention by de Bono kept the 1929 event from being cancelled, and 1930 was marred by a spartan field, little public interest, and the death of Gastone Brilli-Peri in an accident[1]. Initial enthusiasm and sponsorship had retreated, the fallout from Brilli-Peri's accident meant a 1931 running was impossible, and the dream of a successful Tripoli Grand Prix might have ended there and then. But the president of Tripoli's auto club, Edigio Sforzini, was resilient. He decided to organize another Grand Prix, this time on a purpose built European style racing circuit. Sufficient capital was raised from the Italian government's funding of a fair promoting the colony so as to make the venture possible, and upon the circuit's completion the Grand Prix was scheduled for the spring of 1933.[1] This new Mellaha Lake track was a 13.140 kilometer (8.165 mi) long affair situated in a salt basin between Tripoli, Suq al Jum'ah (also known as Suk el Giuma or Sugh el Giumaa (سوق الجمعة)) and Tajura. The track's most distinctive landmark was a brilliant white concrete tower situated across from a large frontstretch grandstand that could hold up to ten thousand people[2]. Mellaha Lake was equipped with starting lights and a photo-electric timing system[1], both innovations, and the additional amenities rivaled the best that continental European circuits had to offer. With Italy exerting further control over its North African holdings, including the appointment of Italo Balbo as Governor-General and the joining of Italian Cyrenaica and Italian Tripolitania into a single colony, Libya, the event gained even more spectacle. The participants were treated like royalty, staying in luxury at the Hotel Uaddan with its casino and dinner theater and being entertained by Balbo at his palace. All this led Dick Seaman to describe Mellaha Lake as the "ascot of motor racing circuits"[2], and coupled with its substantial total prize, it is easy to see why the Tripoli Grand Prix became such a popular date on the calendar. From 1933 to 1938, the Grand Prix was run to the Formula Libre standard, meaning that no weight or engine restrictions were enforced on what was then the fastest track in the world. By 1939, the Italians had tired of Germany's dominance and they turned it into a Voiturette race for smaller, 1500cc cars, but they were foiled when a specially-built Mercedes driven by Hermann Lang won[3]. In 1940, with only the factory Alfa Romeo and Maserati teams plus independents in attendance, Giuseppe Farina took his only major pre-war victory[4]. It was a phyrric and irrelevant result, and the Tripoli Grand Prix was never held again. UAE /Algeria / Yemen / Bahrain / / Palestine/ Iraq/ Kuwait/ Libya/ Lebanon/ Morocco/ Egypt/ Mauritania/ Qatar/ Syria/ Sudan/ Oman/ Tunisia /Saudi Arabia/ / Jordan/UK/England/USA/Germany/France/Spa in الإمارات /البحرين / اليمن/ الجزائر / فلسطين/ الكويت/ /العراق /ليبيا / لبنان /المغرب / مصر / موريتانيا / الأردن/ تونس / السعودية / السودان/ عمان/ قطر / سورية تمتيع تفحيط تسطريب ليبيا طرابلس





Grand Prix´s 1936
Rennaufnahmen von 1936





Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?




Similar 1/4 mile timeslips to browse:

2006 Suzuki GSX-R mirock outlaw pro street spec 1000: 7.217 @ 193.460
ralph medrano jr, Engine: gs1100 based 1570 cc 4 valve, Supercharger: none Turbos: none Tires: mickey thompson et drag


2004 Suzuki GSX-R : 8.343 @ 156.720
Doug Schumann, Engine: 1428 cc, Tires: M/T 3053M (26x15x10)


1992 Suzuki GSX-R 1216cc: 8.403 @ 168.470
Marty Pedler, Engine: 1216 cc, Supercharger: none Turbos: none Tires: Mickey MC2 rear


2006 Suzuki GSX-R Turbo: 8.411 @ 155.330
Jarett Tanaka, Engine: 1000cc, Turbos: Velocity Racing Stage 1


1982 Suzuki GSX-R Dragbike: 8.450 @ 168.900
Duane,


1986 Suzuki GSX-R : 8.670 @ 154.900
glen learmnth,


2006 Suzuki GSX-R Turbo: 8.783 @ 147.100
Jarett Tanaka, Engine: 1000cc, Turbos: Velocity Racing


2005 Suzuki GSX-R 1000 nitrous street bike: 8.840 @ 161.000
perry, Engine: 998cc, Tires: shinko u-soft


1992 Suzuki GSX-R 1216: 8.901 @ 161.950
Franklyn Borg, Engine: Suzuki GSX-R 1216cc, Supercharger: N/A Turbos: N/A Tires: M/T


2006 Suzuki GSX-R 1000: 8.910 @ 154.000
cody shelton,


2005 Suzuki GSX-R 1000 Turbo: 8.951 @ 146.000
Jarett Tanaka, Turbos: Velocity Racing


2003 Suzuki GSX-R 1070: 9.000 @ 154.000
Piotr Czekanski, Engine: 1070cc, Tires: Shinko


2004 Suzuki GSX-R 1000 Nitrous: 9.250 @ 153.000
Jon,


2010 Suzuki GSX-R 750 L0: 9.255 @ 150.000
Kasper Hansen, Tires: Michelin power Cup


2006 Suzuki GSX-R 1000: 9.256 @ 148.350
Steve Rosengreen , Engine: 1000, Tires: Shinko U-soft


2007 Suzuki GSX-R : 9.280 @ 151.500
Ragnar Einarsson, Engine: stock,


2005 Suzuki GSX-R 750: 9.351 @ 140.500
Chris Gunther, Engine: 05 750, Tires: Pilot Power Race


2004 Suzuki GSX-R 750: 9.400 @ 140.000
cody shelton, Tires: rear shinko slick, front 110 mich


2001 Suzuki GSX-R 1000: 9.430 @ 146.000
c webb, Engine: mild cylider head porting,


2007 Suzuki GSX-R : 9.430 @ 153.600
Ragnar, Engine: stock, Tires: shinko hookup


 


©2015 DragTimes - Disclaimer - Contact Us