Triumph Spitfire - 1965 Le Mans 24hrs (19th June 1965)

Spitfires at Le Mans (1965) June 19th 1965 From the Standard Triumph archives Commentary by Raymond Baxter This is a promotional film produced by the Standard Triumph Motor Company of Coventry, England. The film documents the 1965 24hr of Le Mans and the 4 Triumph Spitfire racing prototypes entered by the company.Triumph never identified their cars other than Spitfire racing prototypes with 1.1 litre inline 4 cylinder engines and aerodynamic hard tops.

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The Triumph Motor Company was a British car and motor manufacturing company. The Triumph marque (trade-name) is owned currently by BMW. The marque had its origins in 1885 when Siegfried Bettmann (1863--1951) of Nuremberg initiated S. Bettmann & Co and started importing bicycles from Europe and selling them with his own trade-name in London. The trade-name became "Triumph" the year next, and in 1887 Bettmann was joined by a partner, Moritz (Maurice) Schulte, also from Germany. Beginning in 1889 the businessmen started producing their own bicycles in Coventry, England. In November 1944 what was left of the Triumph Motor Company and the Triumph trade-name were bought by the Standard Motor Company and a subsidiary "Triumph Motor Company (1945) Limited" was formed with production transferred to Standard's factory at Canley, on the outskirts of Coventry. The pre-war Triumph models were not revived and in 1946 a new range of Triumphs was announced, starting with the Triumph Roadster. The Roadster had an aluminium body because steel was in short supply and surplus aluminium from aircraft production was plentiful. In the early 1950s it was decided to use the Triumph name for sporting cars and the Standard name for saloons and in 1953 the Triumph TR2 was initiated, the first of a series that would be produced until 1981.




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