Mini Cooper vs Porsche Carrera S 997

When production of the classic Mini ceased in 2000, BMW (the new owner of the brand) announced the successor to the Mini—which is variously called the "BMW MINI" or the "New MINI". The brand name for the new car is MINI (written in capital letters) In 2004 the 911 was heavily revised[17] and the 996's replacement, the 997, was unveiled in July. The 997 keeps the basic profile of the 996, bringing the drag coefficient down to 0.28, but draws on the 993 for detailing. In addition, the new front fascia is reminiscent of the older generation, with the traditional "bug eye" headlamps. Its interior is also similarly revised, with strong links to the earlier 911 interiors while at the same time looking fresh and modern. The 997 shares less than a third of its parts with the outgoing 996, but is still technically very similar to it. Initially, two versions of the 997 were introduced— the rear wheel drive Carrera and Carrera S. While the base 997 Carrera produced 325 PS (239 kW) from its 3.6 L Flat 6, a more powerful 3.8 L 355 PS (261 kW) Flat 6 powers the Carrera S. Besides a more powerful engine, the Carrera S also comes standard with 19 inch (48 cm) "Lobster Fork" style wheels, more powerful and larger brakes (with red calipers), a more sporty suspension, complete with PASM (Porsche Active Suspension Management) which allows for electronic adjustability of suspension settings, Xenon Headlamps, and Sport Steering wheel.

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japanese electric car vs Porsche 911 turbo
The Eliica (or the Electric Lithium-Ion Car) is a battery electric vehicle prototype or concept car first shown in 2004 and designed by a team at Keio University in Tokyo, led by Professor Hiroshi Shimizu. The 5.1 m (17 ft) car runs on a lithium-ion battery and can accelerate from 0100 km/h (62 mph) in four seconds (faster than the Porsche 911 turbo at the time).[1] In 2004, the Eliica reached a speed of 370 km/h (230 mph) on Italy's Nardò High Speed Track. The team's goal is to exceed 400 km/h (250 mph), breaking the record set by today's street-legal gasoline-powered vehicles. Pundits criticized the 996's styling a great deal, largely because it shared its headlamps— indeed much of its front end, mechanically— with the less expensive Boxster. The 996 had been on the drawing board first and was a more advanced car in some respects, but the cost-cutting seemed inappropriate for an expensive car. Otherwise, the Pinky Lai-penned shape followed the original Butzi Porsche design very closely; the Carrera model had a 0.30 Coefficient of drag. The interior was further criticized for its plainness and its lack of relationship to prior 911 interiors, although this came largely from owners of older 911s.





Porsche Carrera GT vs Mercedes Mclaren SLR
The Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren is an Anglo-German supercar jointly developed by Mercedes-Benz and McLaren Automotive, built in Portsmouth and the McLaren Technology Centre in Woking, Surrey, England. At the time Mercedes-Benz owned 40 percent of the McLaren Group. Due to the presence of the automatic gear box, front mid-engined arrangement, and its driving characteristics, some commentators classify the SLR McLaren as a GT whose rivals would be vehicles like the Aston Martin DBS V12 and Ferrari 599 GTB Fiorano. SLR stands for "Sport, Leicht, Rennsport" (sport, light, racing). Mercedes-Benz stated that they would build 3,500 SLRs over a span of seven years, with an annual production of 500 cars.[1] The car's base price is GB£300,000 (approx. US$495,000 or €346,000, c. 2009).[2] The development of Carrera GT can be traced back to its predecessors, the 911 GT1 and LMP1-98 racing cars. Due in part to the FIA and ACO rule changes in 1998, both designs had ended. Porsche at the time had planned on a new Le Mans prototype for 1999. The car was initially intended to use a turbocharged flat-6, but was later redesigned to use a new V10 engine, pushing the project back to planned completion in 2000. The V10 was a unit secretly built by Porsche for the Footwork Formula One team in 1992, but later shelved. The engine was resurrected for the Le Mans prototype and increased in size to 5.7 litres. Unfortunately the project was canceled after two days of testing for the first car, in mid-1999, mostly due to Porsche's wish to build the Cayenne SUV with involvement from Volkswagen and Audi, thus requiring engineering expertise to be pulled from the motorsports division. It was also speculated that VW-Audi chairman Ferdinand Piëch wanted Audi's new Le Mans Prototype, the Audi R8 not to face competition from Porsche in 2004.





Bolt-on 150 Horsepower with VF Engineering and a Porsche 997 Carrera
Vivid Racing is no stranger to Porsche cars and making them go fast. Having been working with PCars since 2005, we have built some of the best 996 and 997 platforms around. This new customer wanted to really Boost his performance of his 997 Carrera S 3.8L. So he added a VF Engineering Supercharger System. Giving the iconic sports car enough power to equal that of a stock 997 turbo, almost 150hp was gained. Completely stock, this car went from boring to erotic. VF Engineering Supercharger kits have been seen many other VR customer cars including our very own E90 BMW M3. ***Check out all of the VF kits at http://www.vividracing.com/vf Make sure to LIKE and SHARE!





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