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Testing Governor Pressure

How to test Governor Pressure on an Automatic Transmission. I'm using a Chrysler 42RE in a 1997 Dodge Dakota. What I do can be applied to any automatic transmission with an Electronic Governor.


 


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CVT Transmission Pressure Tests
CVT Transmission Pressure Tests Get the book here: https://www.createspace.com/4283730 https://www.createspace.com/371853 The procedures presented here are specific to the Jatco Nissan Sentra CVT transmission. However, these procedures can be effected on any CVT, with the difference being the pressure ports change. Any service manual, will show you the proper ports for the CVT you're working on. Your first tool of choice, is a high pressure gauge, or high pressure electronic transducer. You can also use an oscilloscope, or even better, a graphing multi meter to record the pressure waveforms. Finally, we'll also present a little known device, but with great usefulness. It is called, a duty cycle controller circuit. These duty cycle circuits are now sold at many electronic houses, and can be used to control any electrical solenoid. Most, but not all of them, have variable voltage settings. In our case, we'll use 12 volts. Assuming you'll be using a pressure gauge, use the diagrams seen here, to connect the gauge. Start the engine, and raise the vehicle up in the air, using a shop lift. If not using a lift, do not go under the car with the engine on. Remember that each time we change to a different pressure port, we have to turn the engine off, since the ports are ... Get the whole story right here in this video... Enjoy... *************************************************************************** *********** Amazon Printed-Books & Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&fiel d-keywords=mandy+concepcion Google Play Android APPs: https://play.google.com/store/search?q=mandy+concepcion&c=apps Amazon Video DVDs: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Dmovies-tv&field -keywords=mandy+concepcion





How to Measure Transmission Line Pressure
In this video I demonstrate how to measure the line pressure inside of an automatic transmission





1955 Buick Dynaflow TransmissionTesting
Pressure testing a 1955 Buick Dynaflow transmission after a complete rebuild (prior to installation)





ATI Racing Torque Converter Cut Open Machine





200-R4 Governor and accumulator spring
The project continues to refine so to speak the overdrive 200-R4 transmission retrofitted to a 1972 Oldsmobile Vista Cruiser. Cleanliness and patience, and being flexible too when working in cramped conditions helps with these sort of projects. The softer shift (will still be more firm then stock, as there is a shift kit in this transmission) will not be detrimental to the 2nd band as it is a Kevlar one, and there is a large oil cooler fitted to the transmission lines as well. The dust cover for the torque converter will finally be fitted too when all is said and done.





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Have no forward gears, testing line pressure.





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Transmission line pressure testing with Pico's WPS500 Pressure Transducer
Transmission line pressure testing made easy with the PicoScope and the WPS500 pressure transducer. Brought to you by Autonerdz





The Governor
At Monster Transmission we build more than transmissions, we build relationships. Part of that relationship is educating clients about transmissions. We are not here to lecture and point fingers at mistakes, but to inform how to improve your transmission's longevity and quality. In this tech tip Josh will show us how to remove the governor to check it for damage. He removes an old rusty governor and compares it to a good one. You can find more Tech Videos at : http://www.monstertransmission.com/Tech-Info_ep_42.html Or give us a call at 800-708-0087 https://www.facebook.com/eatmyshift https://plus.google.com/109895300680452893001 https://www.youtube.com/MonsterTrasmission https://www.Instagram.com/MonsterTrans https://www.monstertransmission.com/blog.asp https://www.linkedin.com/company/monster-transmission-&-performance





How to adjust bands and change automatic transmission fluid
This is a demonstration of how I tightened the bands of my automatic transmission and changed the transmission fluid and filter. The vehicle is a 1998 Dodge Ram 1500 4X4 with a 46RE transmission. This repair was done after a transfer case repair which required removal of the propeller shafts. With the front shaft out of the way, access to the front band adjustment screw was better than normal. It is possible to do this with the shaft in place, but access for demonstration is not as good. For details of how the propeller shaft is removed, see my other videos on repairing a Dodge transfer case oil leak. Note that the details of how this is done, especially the torque settings and the number of rotations backward after ideal torque, are very specific to the 46RE transmission. Be sure the locknut is backed off enough that it doesn't bottom out when the adjustment screw is tightened. Before ever doing this type of procedure yourself, you should consult the dealers repair manual and verify the specific procedure in your car. This is an amateur demonstration done for entertainment purposes only. The information offered here is given in good faith but with no guarantees of accuracy or safety. Any misadventure you encounter if you decide to do maintenance on your own vehicle is your responsibility. Short clip of music midway through is royalty free music "The Messenger", from Youtube creation tools, author unknown. Thunderclap sound used under Creative Commons 3.0 license, done by RHumphries at http://freesound.org/people/RHumphries/





518, 47Re, 48Re, 46Rr, Chrysler/Dodge Transmission Rebuild
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Dodge Durango Transmission overdrive problem
This is a 1998 Dodge Durango that the transmission was acting up when ever you would go 60 mph and above. The symptoms were; transmission would not stay in overdrive which caused a jerking motion on the vehicle because it was going in and out of gear when the vehicle would reach the speed of 60 mph and above. Had terrible jerking motions at speeds of 70 mph and above and tachometer would constantly be jumping due to overdrive dropping to third and back to overdrive. The vehicle was road tested by a former Dodge repair technician who has his own repair center now , he scanned the vehicle while the symptoms were happening, nothing was showing on the scanner that there was any problems, he said it was a transmission problem and suggested I take to a transmission repair center. The transmission repair center technician ran his scanner while the problem was occurring, all it showed was the Durango computer telling the transmission to drop down to third and back to overdrive. There was no indication why the computer was telling the transmission to do this, no codes in the computer at all and no indications of problems on the scanner. Transmission needed to be serviced so while at the transmission repair shop they recommended replacing the governor pressure solenoid and transducers sensor and said that this could cause the problem but was not 100% sure. So they serviced the transmission and replaced those parts and it still had the same symptoms. So I did a Google search on this problem and found out that there is several things that could cause the symptom or similar symptoms. One thing that came up on Google most of the time that repaired the problem was the throttle position sensor, I replace this part and symptoms continued. Second in line that would fix this problem for others that were having similar symptoms was replacing the output speed sensor which is on the outside of the transmission, I replace this part and it fixed my problem. I would suggest if you are having this same problem to start by replacing the output speed sensor or throttle position sensor before replacing the governor pressure solenoid and the transducers sensor. I am not a professional mechanic but I do repair my own vehicles most of the time and have been doing it since 1977 so I do have knowledge repairing without having to go do a Google search. I hope this will help anyone else that is having the symptom.





Monster Transmission Testing Process - The Monster Way
Monster Transmission tests every transmission for your piece of mind. We run several test vehicles to test our transmissions. Under actual life driving conditions we are able to accurately monitor line pressure, temperature, shift points and shift firmness. We use various gauges to really get a good look and idea to see whats going on inside of the transmission. For our higher performance applications Monster Transmission is the only transmission company in the world that tests their cars on a chassis Dyno. This allows us to test our transmissions at speeds that we would not be able to run on the streets. As you can see we have a very thorough and lengthy process for building a Monster Transmission. A transmission is a vital part of your drivetrain so we have many checks and balances in place to make sure we live up to our High Quality claim. We want to help protect your investment and provide you with a transmission that shifts better, and lasts longer! We know it isn't the easiest way, but it's the Monster way! Looking for a Transmission? Check us out a http://MonsterTransmission.com Or Give us a Call: 800-708-0087





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