New 2012 Audi RS4 Avant

The first pictures of the Audi RS4 Avant have been leaked, ahead of its debut at the Geneva Motor Show. Looking tastefully restrained, the wagon has a new front fascia with a honeycomb grille and larger air intakes. Out back, there's a tailgate-mounted spoiler, a redesigned rear bumper and two massive Exhaust tips. We can also see LED-infused headlights, high-performance brakes, matte aluminum accents and 19-inch alloy wheels. Inside, the cabin features sport seats, a flat-bottomed steering wheel, carbon fiber trim and alloy pedals. Power will reportedly be provided by a 4.2-liter V8 engine with 450 PS (331 kW / 444 hp) and 430 Nm (317 lb-ft) of torque. It will be connected to an S tronic transmission which is backed up by a quattro all-wheel drive system. This could enable the model to rocket from 0-100 km/h in 4.7 seconds, before hitting a top speed of up to 280 km/h (174 mph).

More Videos...


Audi RS 4 rollover at Willow Springs Raceway
Turn 9 at Big Willow claims another car. So, before the internet tells me how much I did wrong - let me tell you that I know I messed up. I've been tracking for eight years, have been to this track numerous times in a number of cars and know T9 is a very late apex, decreasing radius turn. Here's my take. In this case, I turned in too early and too sharply. It was early in the day and early in the session, so I wasn't up to full speed and felt I had enough track to recover. The car tracked out and I maintained the steering angle I normally would for track out, pointing me down the track toward the right side to set up for T1. Though, in this case, the angle was too steep and the grip too low, so the car tracked out a foot too wide. I know the protocol is to just go straight off with two feet in, and in hindsight I should have done that. However, in the moment, it wasn't apparent the car was going to go wide until the very last instant, leaving me no chance. While I don't think I over-corrected, the steering wheel was definitely turned to the right some degree to get the nose pointed back down the straight. Once the left side dropped, the car shot back across the track and I tried to get the car to go off straight, but it was too late and there was no grip for steering or braking inputs to have any effect. I had a chance to save it mid-corner, too. I had lifted mid-corner to get the car tucked back in toward the apex, but I got on the throttle too quickly and too aggressively, also forcing the car to push wider on exit. Had I laid off the throttle longer, or even tapped the brakes to help with front-end grip, and got the car pointing down the track before getting on throttle, I could have saved the corner -- and the car -- that way too. Yes, I made an error. It's not my first and it won't be my last. In the grand scheme, dropping two off isn't an egregious mistake, but here at Willow Springs in turn 9, it's one with grave consequences. Thanks for watching. Be careful out there! Hope you can learn from this mistake as I have. For those curious, captured with a GoPro HERO4 Silver, mounted on the outside of the front windshield. Camera survived unscathed and still attached, though it stopped recording when the car landed on the roof, probably hitting the shutter button.





Top 10 Audi Advertisement
Top 10 Audi Advertisement Audi latest advertisement Audi Best Advertisement Audi latest commercial Top 10 Audi commercial Audi advertisement Audi new advertisement Audi AG[1] (pronounced [ˈʔaʊ̯diː ʔaːˈgeː] ( listen)) is a German automobile manufacturer that designs, engineers, produces, markets and distributes luxury automobiles. Audi oversees worldwide operations from its headquarters in Ingolstadt, Bavaria, Germany. Audi-branded vehicles are produced in nine production facilities worldwide. Audi has been a majority owned (99.55%) subsidiary of Volkswagen Group since 1966, following a phased purchase of Audi AG's predecessor, Auto Union, from Daimler-Benz.[11] Volkswagen relaunched the Audi brand with the 1965 introduction of the Audi F103 series. The company name is based on the Latin translation of the surname of the founder, August Horch. "Horch", meaning "listen" in German, becomes "audi" in Latin. The four rings of the Audi logo each represent one of four car companies that banded together to create Audi's predecessor company, Auto Union. Audi's slogan is Vorsprung durch Technik, meaning "Advancement through Technology". However, since 2007 Audi USA has used the slogan "Truth in Engineering".[12] Audi is a member of the "German Big 3" luxury automakers, along with BMW and Mercedes-Benz, which are the three best-selling luxury automakers in the world.[13][14]





GENEVA 2012 - Audi RS4 - Auto Express
This is the new Audi RS4 Avant, which stars on Audi's stand this week at the Geneva show. It will be sold only as an Avant estate, with the saloon's place in the range now filled by the RS5 Coupe. Read more: http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/motorshows/geneva-motor-show/278788/audi_rs4_a vant_revealed.html#ixzz1oQMxxcFF Subscribe to Auto Express magazine and get 6 issues for £1 plus a free gift: http://subscribe.autoexpress.co.uk/yt





2016 Audi Smart Factory - Future of Audi Production
2016 Audi Smart Factory P-Tech Day. Audi is making its production fit for the future with the smart factory. In this factory of the future, big data – the creation and intelligent connection of large volumes of data – will facilitate data‑driven and thus highly flexible and highly efficient manufacturing. A method of production in which Audi might no longer build its cars on an assembly line but according to a radically new, disruptive concept is modular assembly. In addition to this major project, Audi is pursuing many other exciting projects for the production of the future – from the application of virtual‑reality glasses to metal 3D printing. Modular assembly. The complexity of automobile production is increasing. New market needs, customer expectations and the legislative framework are increasingly requiring innovative technologies and differing vehicle versions. This means that the fixed timing of the assembly line is becoming less efficient. The more the number of derivatives and variants grows, the more difficult it becomes to master high complexity and integrate new routines into the rigid, sequential process. Audi intends to meet this challenge and to develop a completely new principle for it: modular assembly. With this method, small, separate workstations allow highly flexible working routines – in terms of both time and space. Between those workstations, driverless transport systems take over the transport of the car bodies as well as the parts required for production. A central computer precisely controls the driverless transport systems – it recognizes the needs of each individual station, thus ensuring a smooth workflow. Audi assumes that modular assembly will result in 20 percent better productivity than the assembly lines of today. It is now being applied for test purposes at the engine plant in Győr, Hungary, and application is planned in two further projects. At present, the key principles of this innovative production system are being worked out and tested by “arculus” – a startup company established a few months ago. The Technical Center for Production Assistance Systems. The new driverless transport systems required for modular assembly are being created in Audi’s “Technology Development Production Assistance Systems” department. This small department has developed two types of driverless vehicle: One of them moves under control by a computer, the other moves autonomously on a defined route. Three onboard laser scanners allow the driverless transport systems to orient themselves and to recognize and avoid potentially critical situations. Audi developed the navigation software itself. It is based on automotive software and automotive‑software development processes. The main task of the Technical Center for Production Assistance Systems is to work on new production technologies in early stages of their development. In addition to driverless transport systems, it is also working on four other projects. They comprise safe cooperation between humans and machines when working in the same space, assembly tables with assistance functions and two innovative robots: a flexible gripper arm and a special lightweight robot. The Audi Production Lab. The Audi Production Lab, abbreviated as P‑Lab, develops and supports innovative projects for the production process – often starting with the very first idea. The department currently has five permanent employees andhas already helped to bring innovations such as metal 3D printing, human‑robot cooperation, driverless transport systems and the use of augmented reality at Audi towards series application. The projects currently running in the P‑Lab include two big‑data projects. One of them focuses on the early recognition of mistakes in the placement of screws and bolts; the other examines the flow of components in the area of international logistics for the CKD plants (completely knocked down). Another major subject for the Audi Production Lab is data glasses. They can provide effective support for employees in production, for the planners and engineers in the factory of the future – with assisted reality, augmented reality and virtual reality. Toolmaking. Several future-oriented projects are running in Audi’s Toolmaking division. The structure of the new generation of press tools follows nature, with many parts made of aluminum and plastics. This reduces the weight of those tools, which until now has been up to 45 tons, by up to 20 percent and the energy required decreases by about ten percent. The result is enhanced precision in the forming of sheet‑metal parts. The press shop, where the tools are applied, uses the latest measuring technology. The goal is to develop a complete data chain for each sheet‑metal part. The data chain already begins with the suppliers of steel and aluminum. This is another way in which Audi is enhancing its precision.




Follow