63 Studebaker Lark at the drags

Racing at the street legal drags with my daughter.

More Videos...


1962 Studebaker Lark Daytona "289 OHV 4 speed Manual Hardtop"
1962 Studebaker Lark Daytona. Early 60's Hardtop gasser with the original studebaker 289 OHV motor and T10 4 speed manual on the floor. This Stud also features dual 2 chamber flowmasters with Exhaust knockouts located up near the front fenders. This is a VERY rare car, and i've yet to see another one like it.... Enjoy!





Studebaker Lark MPH Record Run
Run number 2 on turbo upgrade on 300 cube Studebaker 289 motor. Lark ran : 1.944 5.074 7.641 @ 95.79 9.870 11.773 @ 117.52 on 10 lbs pressure Boost.





Take a 200MPH Ride -- Studebaker Powered Avanti
A group of Studenuts put together a Record Breaking Avanti with a 30 year old Stude engine, besting Andy Granatelli's world-famous ride by several MPH.





1962 Studebaker Lark V8 (original) - in detail
At the time the Lark was conceived, Studebaker-Packard Corporation was under a management contract with Curtiss-Wright Aircraft Company. Studebaker-Packard had been losing money for years when company president Harold Churchill came up with the idea of abandoning the full-size car market in favor of building a new compact car that he hoped would save the company. The Lark was ingeniously designed around the core bodyshell of the full-sized 1953-1958 Studebakers. By reducing the front and rear overhangs and shortening the wheelbase, the car could still seat six people comfortably and hold a surprising amount of luggage. It was hoped that the vehicle would save America's oldest vehicle manufacturer when it was launched in the fall of 1958 as a 1959 model, much like the 1939 Studebaker Champion had saved the company in the years prior to World War II. In fact, it was the Champion which Churchill specifically took as his inspiration for the Lark. With its simple grille, minimal and tasteful use of chrome and clean lines, the Lark "flew" in the face of most of the established "longer, lower and wider" styling norms fostered by Detroit's "Big Three" automakers (General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler). Studebaker's 1957-58 Scotsman had proved the existence of a demand for a less-flashy automobile, and while the Lark was not nearly so undecorated as the Scotsman, it was unmistakably purer of line than anything Detroit would offer for 1959.




Follow