Drag Racing 1/4 Mile times 0-60 Dyno Fast Cars Muscle Cars

Installing an eBay 20g

I'm reviewing an ebay 20g TD05 internally-gated turbocharger. You've seen me open it, assess it, and port it. Now I'm going to install it and see how it fits on my car. Its dimensions are close enough to a Mitsubishi turbo that it fits well, but it didn't play nice with my aftermarket stuff as the video illustrates. You'll see what I mean... The wastegate actuator nipple aims straight toward the compressor housing, and I don't like it. I fixed it with a pair of pliers and an allen wrench at 5:55 in a way that's far less likely to break it. The flanges and bolt centers lined up fine and without any issues, though others have claimed to have had them with this turbo. The compressor cover is an obvious giveaway regarding identifying this turbo. It does not wear the cast-in designation TD05H that the Mitsubishi turbos do, but for $228, what do you expect? If you chose to go this route, just manage your expectations. Be aware that it might not bolt up perfectly to your particular car, and be willing to fix what isn't perfect.


 


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More ebay 20g drag passes
Trolled by mother nature. I thought plugging in my o2 sensor might make a difference. Scarily that's not how things worked out. My fuel trims are all jacked up with or without it. Airflow counts are down. I have more to do to this thing, but in an effort to keep things real, I'm uploading what happened and what I found in the logs. The PRIMARY reason for racing is development of both self and your equipment. If your goal is to have an awesome street car, you can't fully-achieve that goal without rigorous testing where numbers and facts are clearly evident. You JUST CAN'T do that on the STREET. There are no numbers on the street, no measurement of a baseline nor any improvements you might make. There's no measurement of a drivers' skill outside of, "did you win or didn't you?" I didn't come to the track with the expectation of MY driving needing to be improved. I was simply getting numbers, so I wasn't a tree-nazi like I was in the Friday Night No-Lift-To-Shift video. There was more incentive for me to just not red-light and see what she'll do. This evening I didn't feel like the track crew were on their A-game. Sometimes they held staged cars for an inordinately long period of time... which once I'm staged, I'm on the rev limiter, and once they left me there awaiting the tree for over 20 seconds, heating my car up and leaving me disadvantaged out of the hole. Other times they treated the starting lanes, dried off my opponent's side but not mine, not giving instruction to hold or wait. In fact, one guy was signaling me forward while another crew member was standing in front of my car spraying the lane. What do you expect for only $15? I'm grateful for them, but the communication could stand improvement over what I saw tonight. Perhaps I'm just a bit miffed with my setup and looking for someone else to blame? The track officials certainly don't deserve any for how it ran this night.





Ebay parts review (honda)
This is a review about ebay and their products, I ran a little about how nobody wants to try anything but yet they want to knock it.. And for all the haters there is something special at the end for y





First ebay 20g drag passes
I made 2 passes. On the first one, nearly everything that could go wrong did. But I'm a persistent bastard. I fixed it all, found everybody and then made this run. It wasn't until after I got home that I realized I had no in-car video footage of the first run when I broke despite having set it up... I kicked the alternator belt off no-lift-to-shifting into 4th gear around 800 feet and coasted to a 13.3 at 82mph against a 10 second Mustang. Overheating with no power steering I limped it back and put the belt back on, only burning myself 9 times, and then got back out and made this run. The guys in front of us broke, too. I guess it was contagious?

This run is on 93 octane pump gas.

I shouldn't have been in such a hurry. It left me a little unprepared. You learn things about other things while doing things--is the best I can explain it. It didn't knock at all, so clearly the new injectors are working fine... but I didn't take time to burp the coolant system, so it ran hot. My alternator belt was loose, and it bailed on me. I was focusing on explaining the video (I deleted that scene from frustration) rather than putting the car back together, and failed to plug in a very important sensor. I would have caught it, but didn't get a chance to look at the logs until I got home. I have to operate so many pieces of equipment in addition to actually driving that it's very distracting.

The guy in my second race had a beautiful 1967 Dodge Dart, and he was a very good sport! It was a great race where adrenaline is involved, and I was focused but wary of whether or not the alternator belt would stay on. I really appreciate the guys that keep old muscle alive. That car's almost 50 years old. That's making history right there... He cut a great 60 foot after they cleaned up the track, but I wish that car didn't break in his lane prior to his pass if it was a problem for his run.

I tried to leave nothing out and keep it short & sweet. I was lucky to have a track-side cameraman for the second race. Thanks Taylor! Having that sensor plugged in would have left me much more confident in the log data and offer a much better assessment of this turbo, but it is what it is. Here it is...





2g GSX How-To: Attempting turbo swap with WTF ending
Okay. Now I've seen it all. There's an old adage that states "if you want something done right, you have to do it yourself". Well, this video both confirms and debunks that theory. A lot of that depends on each person's definition of "done right". You can't do things by-the-book with aftermarket hardware. Sheldon bought this car with a pretty full mod list and it ran great at the time, but by the time we got it to the track, we couldn't beat a 16-second pass. Despite the laundry list of troubleshooting we both attempted to do through tuning and testing, we couldn't determine why it was around 4 seconds slower than it should be running. I started having doubts that a "ported T-28" was what was on the car, and there's no easy way to tell them apart without removing it so we opted to install a 14b... since plenty of people easily run 13's with them. Stick around for the plot twist.





DIY Parts Washer
IF you have access to compressed air, you can clean, degrease and restore the finish on automotive parts (and anything else really, not just DSMs) using the simple, inexpensive tools and supplies I demonstrate in this video. AUDIO TRACK BY: ROJODELCHOCOLATE* Some things don't fit in a parts washer. Sometimes you can't remove them from a vehicle. Sometimes you need to bring your parts washer to your project instead of the other way around. This INEXPENSIVE method for parts cleaning solves all of those problems. Caked-on grease, grime, carbon and oil are no match against this simple solution. For between $6 and $30 you can purchase a siphon-feed blow gun... spray gun... whatever you want to call it. NAPA sells an American made unit that's more expensive (like I used here) that occasionally suffer from quality control issues, and Harbor Freight sells one for $6 that I have no experience with. The tool is so simple that I can't see why it would work any differently. Mineral spirits (coal oil) is a highly-refined petroleum-based, low-odor, low-volatility solvent that can be used for many purposes from thinning paint to serving as thread cutting oil. Automotive professionals found that it actually lifts oil out of metal. This makes it an ideal choice for engine parts cleaning. Because most fluids in your car are petroleum-based, it's the ideal thinner to cut through the grease and wash away the funk. It has a much higher flash point than other solvents that are effective at cleaning up grease and oil. It's very similar to Kerosene. No special breathing aparatus is required. Gloves and googles are recommended. Because of its rapid evaporation, only minor preparations need to be made to your workspace to deal with the run-off. Vaporized mineral spirits evaporate completely just a few feet away from the blow gun, and drippings evaporate leaving only what washed off of your parts behind. If cleaning requires the use of brushes to break up soiled areas, use brushes that are appropriate for the materials you're cleaning. All in all, this solution costs about $10 for tools, and about $15 a gallon for mineral spirits. NO auto parts store solution like degreasers, or stinky, hazardous, toxic chemicals like brake cleaner will deliver these results. If you do this once, you'll be spoiled rotten. You will keep coming back to this mobile parts washer again and again whenever you need to degrease something. It's that good. Machine shops will clean your parts for you. You can do this without leaving your garage. Bring your own air compressor, and the bigger the better because of recovery time... but the siphon action isn't physically complicated, and anything from a pancake air compressor on-up will work. Oh... one more thing... Oil the &$^% out of cast iron parts when you're done. When stripped of oil, they will rust nearly instantly on contact with water or acids from your skin. Oil them. Soak them in clean oil afterwards. Tools you'll need... Siphon-feed blow gun: http://www.sears.com/shc/s/t_10153_12605?tName=air-siphon-gun.html http://www.thefind.com/hardware/info-blow-gun-siphon-sprayer ***** In the UK, Mineral Spirits are called White Spirits. ***** In China, White Spirits is pronounced "bok WHY?" with emphasis on why. Literally translated, that's "white ghost". It also means "egg" but I believe it's said a little differently. ba kwai is a derogatory slang term that Chinese use to describe white people. I'm not kidding. Either way, being called an egg might possibly bother a white person somewhere? Perhaps this is why I forgot to mention it in the video? It's too funny of a fact to leave out of the description. So, go make breakfast and have fun with your cheap, racist parts washer... no matter what color skin you're wrapped in. Mineral Spirits can be bought at your local hardware store. Mineral Spirits MSDS sheet (for the stuff I used in the video): http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=brands&id =16025013 Paint trays, wire brushes, and empty paint cans are also available at your local hardware store. I found that a 1 quart can with the lid cut off is the perfect size for cleaning pistons. Yes, you did see me bust out the Farberware can opener in my garage. A garage is simply a man's kitchen, so I see nothing wrong with this. Of course, it can be a woman's kitchen too... it just needs appliances that are appropriate for use near flammable liquids IF I'm going to be preparing any food while she fixes my car. I would never change my car's oil in a kitchen, though. I also wouldn't use cookware to catch automotive fluids. Just sayin'. * The man made me an 18 minute song in a day. Maybe some of you write music? Words can't describe how grateful I am to receive a quarter of an album from somebody on such short notice, or to explain my gratitude for his contribution.





CRANKWALKED? 7-bolt teardown 1080HD
Now this is a story all about how My bearings got flipped-turned upside down And I'd like to take a minute just sit right there And tell you how I used to mix and burn my gas and my air. In RVA suburbs born and raised On the dragstrip is where I spent most of my days Chillin out, maxin, relaxing all cool, 'n all shooting some BS outside with my tools When a couple of guys who were up to no good Started running races in my neighborhood I heard one little knock and my rods got scared And said "You put it in the garage until you figure out where..." I Begged and pleaded that it not be that way, But it didn't want to start and run another day. I kissed it goodbye, because the motor punched its ticket I got out my camera, said "I might as well kick it." Crankwalk yo this is bad Drinking metal shavings from an oil pan. Is this what the rumor of crankwalk is like? Hmm this won't be alright But wait I heard knocking, grinding and all that Is this the type of failure that should happen to this cool cat? I don't think so, I'll see when I get there I hope they're prepared for this video I share. Well I pulled all the bolts and when I came out There were chunks in my fluids in the pan and they drained out I aint all depressed cause I seen this before. I got my books and my wrench and we'll do it once more. I sprang into action like lightning disassembled I whistled while I worked and my hands never trembled If anything you could say that this bling is rare, and when I saw what broke I stained my underwear. I turned off the air compressor 'bout 7 or 8 And I yelled to crankcase "Yo holmes, smell ya later" I looked at my internals they were finally there To sit on my workbench and stink up the air. Audio track by RojoDelChocolate. Here's the 48,000 mile-old 7-bolt I blew up summer 2011 after over 150 drag passes, a half dozen Dyno sessions, 4 transmissions, 3 clutches and 10 years of hard all-weather use.





Cylinder Head 204 - Porting & Polishing
This is a first-generation 1992 1.6L Hyundai Elantra small-combustion-chamber head. Thats what it is. It's a J1 Elantra cylinder head. Good luck finding another one like it. (read more)... In Cylinder Head 106 I talked about the mainstream porting theories as they are discussed. We looked at a cylinder head that I have thousands of dollars of professional work performed on, and a bone-stock second-generation head that I didn't port. In this video I just might do something you haven't seen done before. For some, that may be uncomfortable. The port and polish job I perform here is what I think will work best for my current build. This is not an extreme killer port job. What will be different here is where port textures are concerned, I will be following the advice of a reputable source that will remain un-named. You're free to port yours differently than I do in this video, and I give you that out, around the 20 minute marker. The Hyundai is far from being an ultimate-performance build. It's a $400 box of scraps with nothing but time invested. It's perfect for this video. My finished product WILL be an improvement over what I had. I don't yet have access to a flow bench. I still have an achievement to un-lock. As far as you should be concerned with the techniques I employ... without flow numbers there is no evidence of what this will do, but we will gather lots of info from dynp sessions and drag strip time slips. If I could test it on a flow bench, I would. There are MANY, and when I say many, I mean thousands of flame war mongering pirates floating around on rough seas with a hair trigger cannon finger itching to fire if you port a head any differently than what the herd mentality says to do while porting a cylinder head. I cover the herd mentality because it has merit. It's been tested. Tried and true. But I don't follow it to the letter of the law. I'm definitely not here to de-bunk it. I would port a cylinder head differently for each build based on how that engine was used. There's an extremely valid reason why relating to air speed. It's not the texture of a port that maximizes the effect of fuel atomization, but the velocity of the air running through an x or y sized valve. The driving factor in this is the piston speed. I'm not going to give you the technical information, but will refer you to information about the Lovell factor. There's a better description of this in the links below, and even a calculator to help you find your engine's sweet spot. Why the Lovell factor is important: https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/3346/the-effect-of-valve-size Lovell gas factor calculator: http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/lovellgascalc.html Only people who have flow testing equipment know for sure what really works and have the capability to produce a perfectly-matched port job for the ultimate performance build. Those guys know the definition of ultimate, and THEY are floating below the water Aegis-class submarines ready to blow your comment up if you don't know what you're talking about. They don't care if you're an armchair mechanic or a herd of pirates. I will say, they're zoomed in pretty close on me right now, and I'm expecting to take a few hits. My work will be tested based on Dyno and drag strip performance, and the results will be posted here. Fortunately, those kinds of videos are a WHOLE LOT EASIER TO MAKE!!!





fix GOT BOOST o2 dump housing
It's a pipe! It's a cheap upgrade. It's going to be awesome but it's not perfect. There, I fixed it. In this video I install a GOT Boost external dump o2 housing onto a turbo I'm fiddling with. The product is sold as "ported" and it is indeed in comparison to the factory part... but there are a variety of Exhaust housings this could be port-matched to, so I'm glad it didn't arrive with this done for some other turbo. It can benefit from a little tweaking. The technique I'm using here is gasket matching. Using the gasket as a guide, cut the ports so that both flange surfaces match. Radius your steps or remove them if there's enough material to play with. Polish off the rough spots. Mine wasn't flat and I'm glad. Because I got to show you how to fix it at 600x and save you hours of footage of me filing it flat. Stroke hand files in ONLY ONE DIRECTION. They're not made to use like hacksaws. It destroys them. At the speed the video plays, you can't really pick that out of it but I was very careful to preserve my file. I've had it for 15 years.





How to port and polish a turbo exhaust housing
I'll fill this in later. The "book" I typed in this field before didn't save. Come back later if you want to read more about the theories behind porting and polishing.





Turbo Elantra Bearing Failure Diagnosis
I had time to look at this thing up close. Go through the oil system, and check out all the bearings. Looks like another good study for my oil system series because it's the opposite problem that my GSX experienced. High oil pressure can be remedied a number of ways, but left unchecked can actually take a toll on your bearings. The way your engine bearings work, the parts they suspend are supported only by an oil film layer, and flow needs to be right in order for it to work as an actual bearing. If the oil supply is insufficient, then it loses the ability to suspend the part causing it to crash into the bearing surface. If oil flow is too great, friction is increased, the flow becomes turbulent, and the oil film doesn't form properly. High oil pressure can float and spin rod bearings, and that's worst-case scenario. I had several un-favorable conditions going on inside this engine and that makes it a little bit difficult to link what my engine experienced to any one singular thing. I think it's easier to look at it like some sort of perfect storm. From sub-standard parts for how the engine components would be used, to oil pressure, to part fatigue, to part history to abuse... this thing's got a little bit of everything working against it and that's why it's such a hilarious car. It was given to me with one condition. "See what this thing will do, and see how long it goes before it breaks." My take on it is, the parts are still less than ideal, and they've still got life left in them. It's worth fixing. These parts are worthless as a race motor, and normally I'd have junked 'em, but it's the Hyundai.





Basic AN Hose Tech - making AN hoses
I wasn't going to upload this for multiple reasons, but someone out there will find it useful. It's better to use real AN wrenches rather than the stuff I'm using in this video because they're less likely to scratch or mark up the anodized finish on your fittings. Some of the footage is out of focus or frame and I'm not to happy about that, but you can still tell what's going on and it's repetitive. But lastly, I wanted to try the brick-splitter method & I'm doing it wrong. Still, I hate that method. I linked to the proper way to use that method... to someone else's video at the end. I don't like that method because the edges don't "just straighten right out". The rubber lining on the inside usually gets cracked and it seems to stay football-shaped. Plus, making hoses is snooze material. It's monkey work. You do it once and you never forget how. The fittings that these things connect to, or the process of installing them on your car where you want to use these hoses is much more challenging, and interesting. Usually requires hunting down bastardized 3/4" BSP-to-AN and Metric-to-AN fittings or having to weld things. That's the fun part. Become familiar with Pegasus Auto Racing Supplies for some of that stuff, and the community of DSM tuners developing specialized adapters for others. www.ongreenperformance.com sells metric-to-8 AN fittings for the '90 oil filter housing. Pegasus Auto Racing Supplies sells some BSP fittings, but those things are hard to hunt down. The factory ones are tapered, but nobody sells tapered adapter fitting, they'll be straight-thread BSP, but they'll fit. They have a lot of other handy stuff like metric-to-? AN banjo bolts that fit turbine housings. Summit is where I got all my Russell hose ends, o-rings, cushion clamps, NPT tees, fuel filter, etc... I'm sure I have more than $500 worth of fittings throughout my car. Much more if you count shipping...





Boost Leak Testing 201: Using the tool.
This is the second part of the Boost leak testing series. In this video, several examples of possible leaks you might find are exhibited, as well as suggested fixes. Hopefully this video helps turbo cars around the world to be healthier and more powerful.





How to Rebuild a Turbo - Part 1 of 2
Rebuilding a td05h 16g turbo. This process can be applied to many journal bearing turbochargers. :) It definitely comes in handy to know how to do this when you are in this type of hobby. 4/25/12: Small explanation on the balancing of the rotating assembly since I get so many comments regarding it. This particular turbocharger, td05h, has its rotating assembly components balanced separately. This means each individual part (compressor wheel, turbine wheel/shaft) gets balanced separately. This allows for easy interchangeability of parts in case they need replacing. This is why I am able to install a td05 20g wheel on this turbo without having to balance the entire rotating assembly. THIS IS NOT THE CASE FOR ALL turboS OUT THERE. You need to research whether your specific turbo (if it's not td05h) was balanced as an assembly or "component balanced" like I explained above. I hope this information helps. Good luck in your projects. Stay Boostin' keywords: turbocharger dsm eclipse talon awd gsx tsi fwd gst mitsubishi evo evolution lancer 14b 20g td06 td06h td05 install installation upgrade race vs Boost supra wrx sti toyota subaru Dyno laser rs rst 13g hx35 hx40 holset 18g 25g sbr t25 stock replace rebuilding big large nissan 240sx t28





Ebay turbo 1,000 mile update
EMUSA turbo 1,000 miles .064" restrictor with -3AN feed line





Boost Leak Testing 202: Hair Spray 1080HD
Why do I know about this? I'm tired of being the one knowing all the weird crap. If everyone knows it, it won't be weird anymore. It will be commonplace. By the time I'm done sealing up all of my own Boost leaks, all of you will also be experts as well. I'm sure most of you would teach me something, too... but you subscribed, so here it comes... something I learned in my travels... Also, thanks Ilya M. I've only heard about it twice in my life. It worked great for the one time I've ever needed it, and I'm a huge fan.





Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?




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