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Installing an eBay 20g

I'm reviewing an ebay 20g TD05 internally-gated turbocharger. You've seen me open it, assess it, and port it. Now I'm going to install it and see how it fits on my car. Its dimensions are close enough to a Mitsubishi turbo that it fits well, but it didn't play nice with my aftermarket stuff as the video illustrates. You'll see what I mean... The wastegate actuator nipple aims straight toward the compressor housing, and I don't like it. I fixed it with a pair of pliers and an allen wrench at 5:55 in a way that's far less likely to break it. The flanges and bolt centers lined up fine and without any issues, though others have claimed to have had them with this turbo. The compressor cover is an obvious giveaway regarding identifying this turbo. It does not wear the cast-in designation TD05H that the Mitsubishi turbos do, but for $228, what do you expect? If you chose to go this route, just manage your expectations. Be aware that it might not bolt up perfectly to your particular car, and be willing to fix what isn't perfect.


 


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First ebay 20g drag passes
I made 2 passes. On the first one, nearly everything that could go wrong did. But I'm a persistent bastard. I fixed it all, found everybody and then made this run. It wasn't until after I got home that I realized I had no in-car video footage of the first run when I broke despite having set it up... I kicked the alternator belt off no-lift-to-shifting into 4th gear around 800 feet and coasted to a 13.3 at 82mph against a 10 second Mustang. Overheating with no power steering I limped it back and put the belt back on, only burning myself 9 times, and then got back out and made this run. The guys in front of us broke, too. I guess it was contagious?

This run is on 93 octane pump gas.

I shouldn't have been in such a hurry. It left me a little unprepared. You learn things about other things while doing things--is the best I can explain it. It didn't knock at all, so clearly the new injectors are working fine... but I didn't take time to burp the coolant system, so it ran hot. My alternator belt was loose, and it bailed on me. I was focusing on explaining the video (I deleted that scene from frustration) rather than putting the car back together, and failed to plug in a very important sensor. I would have caught it, but didn't get a chance to look at the logs until I got home. I have to operate so many pieces of equipment in addition to actually driving that it's very distracting.

The guy in my second race had a beautiful 1967 Dodge Dart, and he was a very good sport! It was a great race where adrenaline is involved, and I was focused but wary of whether or not the alternator belt would stay on. I really appreciate the guys that keep old muscle alive. That car's almost 50 years old. That's making history right there... He cut a great 60 foot after they cleaned up the track, but I wish that car didn't break in his lane prior to his pass if it was a problem for his run.

I tried to leave nothing out and keep it short & sweet. I was lucky to have a track-side cameraman for the second race. Thanks Taylor! Having that sensor plugged in would have left me much more confident in the log data and offer a much better assessment of this turbo, but it is what it is. Here it is...





Cylinder Head 204 - Porting & Polishing
This is a first-generation 1992 1.6L Hyundai Elantra small-combustion-chamber head. Thats what it is. It's a J1 engine's cylinder head. In Cylinder Head 106 I talked about the mainstream porting theories as they are discussed. We looked at a cylinder head that I have thousands of dollars of professional work performed on, and a bone-stock second-generation head that I didn't port. In this video I just might do something you haven't seen done before. For some, that may be uncomfortable. The port and polish job I perform here is what I think will work best for my current build. This is not an extreme killer port job. What will be different here is where port textures are concerned, I will be following the advice of a reputable source that will remain un-named. You're free to port yours differently than I do in this video, and I give you that out, around the 20 minute marker. The Hyundai is far from being an ultimate-performance build. It's a $400 box of scraps with nothing but time invested. It's perfect for this video. My finished product WILL be an improvement over what I had. I don't yet have access to a flow bench. I still have an achievement to un-lock. As far as you should be concerned with the techniques I employ... without flow numbers there is no evidence of what this will do, but we will gather lots of info from dynp sessions and drag strip time slips. If I could test it on a flow bench, I would. There are MANY, and when I say many, I mean thousands of flame war mongering pirates floating around on rough seas with a hair trigger cannon finger itching to fire if you port a head any differently than what the herd mentality says to do while porting a cylinder head. I cover the herd mentality because it has merit. It's been tested. Tried and true. But I don't follow it to the letter of the law. I'm definitely not here to de-bunk it. I would port a cylinder head differently for each build based on how that engine was used. There's an extremely valid reason why relating to air speed. It's not the texture of a port that maximizes the effect of fuel atomization, but the velocity of the air running through an x or y sized valve. The driving factor in this is the piston speed. I'm not going to give you the technical information, but will refer you to information about the Lovell factor. There's a better description of this in the links below, and even a calculator to help you find your engine's sweet spot. Why the Lovell factor is important: https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/3346/the-effect-of-valve-size Lovell gas factor calculator: http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/lovellgascalc.html Only people who have flow testing equipment know for sure what really works and have the capability to produce a perfectly-matched port job for the ultimate performance build. Those guys know the definition of ultimate, and THEY are floating below the water Aegis-class submarines ready to blow your comment up if you don't know what you're talking about. They don't care if you're an armchair mechanic or a herd of pirates. I will say, they're zoomed in pretty close on me right now, and I'm expecting to take a few hits. My work will be tested based on Dyno and drag strip performance, and the results will be posted here. Fortunately, those kinds of videos are a WHOLE LOT EASIER TO MAKE!!!





Turbo Elantra Bearing Failure Diagnosis
I had time to look at this thing up close. Go through the oil system, and check out all the bearings. Looks like another good study for my oil system series because it's the opposite problem that my GSX experienced. High oil pressure can be remedied a number of ways, but left unchecked can actually take a toll on your bearings. The way your engine bearings work, the parts they suspend are supported only by an oil film layer, and flow needs to be right in order for it to work as an actual bearing. If the oil supply is insufficient, then it loses the ability to suspend the part causing it to crash into the bearing surface. If oil flow is too great, friction is increased, the flow becomes turbulent, and the oil film doesn't form properly. High oil pressure can float and spin rod bearings, and that's worst-case scenario. I had several un-favorable conditions going on inside this engine and that makes it a little bit difficult to link what my engine experienced to any one singular thing. I think it's easier to look at it like some sort of perfect storm. From sub-standard parts for how the engine components would be used, to oil pressure, to part fatigue, to part history to abuse... this thing's got a little bit of everything working against it and that's why it's such a hilarious car. It was given to me with one condition. "See what this thing will do, and see how long it goes before it breaks." My take on it is, the parts are still less than ideal, and they've still got life left in them. It's worth fixing. These parts are worthless as a race motor, and normally I'd have junked 'em, but it's the Hyundai.





Honda ebay review
This is a review about ebay and their products, I ran a little about how nobody wants to try anything but yet they want to knock it.. And for all the haters there is something special at the end for you ;)





How to Rebuild a Turbo - Part 1 of 2
Rebuilding a td05h 16g turbo. This process can be applied to many journal bearing turbochargers. :) It definitely comes in handy to know how to do this when you are in this type of hobby. 4/25/12: Small explanation on the balancing of the rotating assembly since I get so many comments regarding it. This particular turbocharger, td05h, has its rotating assembly components balanced separately. This means each individual part (compressor wheel, turbine wheel/shaft) gets balanced separately. This allows for easy interchangeability of parts in case they need replacing. This is why I am able to install a td05 20g wheel on this turbo without having to balance the entire rotating assembly. THIS IS NOT THE CASE FOR ALL turboS OUT THERE. You need to research whether your specific turbo (if it's not td05h) was balanced as an assembly or "component balanced" like I explained above. I hope this information helps. Good luck in your projects. Stay Boostin' keywords: turbocharger dsm eclipse talon awd gsx tsi fwd gst mitsubishi evo evolution lancer 14b 20g td06 td06h td05 install installation upgrade race vs Boost supra wrx sti toyota subaru Dyno laser rs rst 13g hx35 hx40 holset 18g 25g sbr t25 stock replace rebuilding big large nissan 240sx t28





Cylinder Head 205 - Degree DOHC Camshafts
This video is all about establishing your valve timing baseline, and adjusting your camshafts to the manufacturer's spec. It's only ONE of several steps that should be performed when you're assembling your engine on an engine stand. Establishing these conditions with accuracy while your engine installed in the car is a near-impossibility, and the reason why... is demonstrated in this video. There are several challenges to overcome when performing these procedures on a 4gxx series Mitsubishi engine, and they're all defeated here. The cylinder head used in this video is a J1 spec '92 Hyundai Elantra small-combustion chamber head which has had several valve jobs and has been resurfaced multiple times by budget engine remanufacturers who didn't care about quality control, as well as performance shops who do. It has had no less than .040" removed from the head gasket surface, the valves are recessed because of all the valve jobs performed, and at some point when it was cut, it wasn't level. Removing material from the deck surface will change the installed camshaft centerline, and that will change your engine's valve timing events even if all other parts remain the same. I would claim this is a multi-part video except that I've got the videos broken up by topic already, and this one is all about setting your cams to the manufacturer's specification. It is not the end of testing that will be performed with these tools. The basics concerning the process and tool fabrication are covered here. Further discussion on this topic concerning the effects of advancing or retarding camshafts from spec, and for checking your valve clearance will be in the videos that follow. I had to end this video after the manufacturer's spec was achieved to make it easier to digest, and because it would have created a video greater than one hour in length despite the break-neck speeds that things happen here on Jafromobile. Where your cams are set determine how the swept volume of the combustion chamber gets used. The information on the manufacturer's spec sheet is their recommendation for baseline settings that will help you get the most out of those camshafts. Whether or not your engine can operate with those specifications without additional hardware or without causing a catastrophic failure will be expanded upon in Cylinder Head 206. The next video should be used as a companion to this video because establishing the manufacturer's baseline is not the end of the assembly or testing process. It's only half the battle. Should you be lucky enough to find your combination of parts allow your camshafts to fit and requires no additional adjustment after assembly, the steps in this video and in Cylinder Head 206 should still be performed if you are doing the assembly yourself. Failure to inspect these variables may lead to a tuning nightmare once the engine is back in the car, hard starts, or worse... bent valves and damaged wrist pins. Making these tools and performing these steps will give you the peace of mind to know with certainty that your engine is operating safely at its peak performance.





Boost Leak Testing 202: Hair Spray 1080HD
Why do I know about this? I'm tired of being the one knowing all the weird crap. If everyone knows it, it won't be weird anymore. It will be commonplace. By the time I'm done sealing up all of my own Boost leaks, all of you will also be experts as well. I'm sure most of you would teach me something, too... but you subscribed, so here it comes... something I learned in my travels... Also, thanks Ilya M. I've only heard about it twice in my life. It worked great for the one time I've ever needed it, and I'm a huge fan.





The ebay turbo is finally worn out.. 11k miles of abuse!
For whatever reason, Precision built a 62mm instead of the requested 67. So now we wait for them to build the right one and ship it out. Should have it this coming week though.





Hyundai Assembly 5 - Fighting The Valve Clearance
In previous videos I showed the 2 factors that really need to be scrutinized. Valve clearance and how you degree your camshafts. Of course we got sidetracked with plenty of other tips and tricks but I wanted to upload this video to illustrate that the process really isn't as easy as the animations, demonstrations and explanations make it look. The reasoning is sound, but the work to execute it can be very tedious. Setting up the valvetrain on this engine was very tedious. I say "was" because following this video, we can put that whole topic to bed. This is what it took. Not many people have the patience to deal with this, and I wanted to showcase here for those who are at the peak of their frustration with their builds. This kind of stuff can happen to anyone. Let my pain and suffering help you not feel so all alone. My apologies for the lack of new groundbreaking technical info. It's not a complicated task to install ARP head studs, and that was my plot twist. There are a couple of hurdles you may encounter depending on the production year of your engine, but they're well illustrated in this video. I'm not sure if their installation warrants a video all unto itself, but if you feel it does, speak up because I have 3 more engines to build. I can still do it. I just wanted to demonstrate that progress is being made on this, and despite the long breaks between uploads, a LOT is going on behind the scenes. This was 20 hours of repetitive work and I hope it's at least mildly entertaining. For me, this was the most boring video I've ever edited here because I had to re-live the same steps so many times, over and over again. I could very easily have inserted an hour of it in the wrong place and nobody would ever have known because it all looks the same. The text overlays are there only so you can be aware of what's different. A voiceover would have been pointless because the techniques illustrated are discussed ad-nauseum in the Cylinder Head 205 and 206 videos. The valve cover gasket installation process was covered in "Valve Cover Modification and Polishing", and the discussion about compression ratios is explained in "Calculate Your Compression Ratio". If you like the job the parts washer did, check out my DIY parts washer video. ;) Cylinder Head 205 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbWWCKPuZG4 Cylinder Head 206 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4s2X3VUwADA Valve Cover Modification and Polishing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NiIi9EljLSk Calculate Your Compression Ratio https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWze92nt9OU





Basic AN Hose Tech - making AN hoses
I wasn't going to upload this for multiple reasons, but someone out there will find it useful. It's better to use real AN wrenches rather than the stuff I'm using in this video because they're less likely to scratch or mark up the anodized finish on your fittings. Some of the footage is out of focus or frame and I'm not to happy about that, but you can still tell what's going on and it's repetitive. But lastly, I wanted to try the brick-splitter method & I'm doing it wrong. Still, I hate that method. I linked to the proper way to use that method... to someone else's video at the end. I don't like that method because the edges don't "just straighten right out". The rubber lining on the inside usually gets cracked and it seems to stay football-shaped. Plus, making hoses is snooze material. It's monkey work. You do it once and you never forget how. The fittings that these things connect to, or the process of installing them on your car where you want to use these hoses is much more challenging, and interesting. Usually requires hunting down bastardized 3/4" BSP-to-AN and Metric-to-AN fittings or having to weld things. That's the fun part. Become familiar with Pegasus Auto Racing Supplies for some of that stuff, and the community of DSM tuners developing specialized adapters for others. www.ongreenperformance.com sells metric-to-8 AN fittings for the '90 oil filter housing. Pegasus Auto Racing Supplies sells some BSP fittings, but those things are hard to hunt down. The factory ones are tapered, but nobody sells tapered adapter fitting, they'll be straight-thread BSP, but they'll fit. They have a lot of other handy stuff like metric-to-? AN banjo bolts that fit turbine housings. Summit is where I got all my Russell hose ends, o-rings, cushion clamps, NPT tees, fuel filter, etc... I'm sure I have more than $500 worth of fittings throughout my car. Much more if you count shipping...





Calculate Your Compression Ratio
This is everything you need to do to calculate your compression ratio. No foolin'. Every equation and process demonstrated. Find all your variables. Know your exact compression ratio in every cylinder. This is how you do it. Just because your service manual says your car is 7.8:1 or 8.5:1 compression doesn't mean that it is. Whenever there are casting irregularities, variations in piston height, parts that have been machined, non-OE parts, or changes to your head gasket selection, your compression ratio WILL change. It's highly probable that you're only CLOSE to spec if you've never touched your engine at all since it was "born", and that it doesn't MATCH spec. Even if it did, how would you know? This. 5 variables. V1 Swept Volume V2 Deck Volume V3 Piston-to-deck clearance V4 Piston dish cc's V5 Head combustion chamber cc's The ratio math: V1+V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at BDC V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at TDC The ratio is... (V1+V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) : (V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) or BDC ÷ TDC : TDC ÷ TDC First you fill in the variables, then you calculate volumes, then you add the volumes, then you reduce the ratio (fraction). It's that easy. Here are your magic numbers: 0.7854 = Pi quartered to the ten thousandth 16.387 = number of cc's in a cubic inch. If you divide any number in cc's by 16.387 it gives you inches. If you multiply any number in cubic inches by 16.387 it gives you cc's. Quartering pi lets you use the calculation: BORE x BORE x STROKE x .7854 = volume of a cylinder instead of... π x (BORE ÷ 2) x (BORE ÷ 2) x STROKE = volume of a cylinder Either way is right. You get the same result if you calculate pi to the ten thousandth. While I apologize for all the math, no I don't. I'm really not sorry. You actually clicked here for it whether you realize it or not. This is ALL the math, the tests, and the whole process to calculate your cylinder volumes and compression individually even if you don't know any of your variables yet. All of my numbers are present for those who want to calculate out the last 3 cylinders out of curiosity just to see how it affects cylinder volumes and compression ratios from one cylinder to the next. Why would I do that for you? Why would I deprive you of that practice? Just assume that all 4 of my combustion chambers are 41.75 ml if you do this. Clicking like share and subscribe helps a channel grow. It also motivates me. Don't sweat the camera. It's enough to know that so many of you care about what I'm doing here. From the bottom of my atmospheric dump, I thank you all! This gift horse's teeth are all over the place, but he sometimes poops gold nuggets. PS: Use ATF for your piston dish volume tests, not alcohol. Of course it's better just to use the spec sheet included with your pistons... but not everyone gets that luxury. Water is just fine for head combustion chamber tests. Dry and re-oil all parts that water touches.





Hyundai Assembly 4 - Balancing Rods
I edited this video to its finished state, and RojoDelChocolate handed me a track with no collaboration that was the right length and rhythm. I literally did nothing to the video once the audio track was dropped in, and that's just how it went. I can't believe it. It's like when you're pumping gas into a Ford F150 full-blast and release the pump handle to stop right on $80.00 even. He's got more musical talent in his pinky fingernail than I have mechanical ability in my spleen, appendix and tonsils combined. Thank you RojoDelChocolate. Here I'm cleaning up the fly cuts, balancing the piston and rod assemblies and preparing to double-check my valve clearance. I had to start by cleaning up and re-lubricating every part that was removed to prevent contamination of the assembly. This is the tedious part of doing the job right. We learned that this whole engine assembly was pretty far-gone in previous videos, way past its service limits, so making it fit and work again takes extensive testing, machining, and re-testing to ensure all of the parts fit. This is likely the most challenging build I will perform on any car in my driveway. It has been so far. But because I have not demonstrated the basics of engine balancing beyond what a machine shop has to do to zero balance a flat-plane crankshaft, I thought I'd give it its own video right here with one of the test assemblies. When you balance rods by themselves, you balance the big-end and the pin-bore separately. You get weights of both ends of the rod using a jig and a process that I don't demonstrate in this video. The reason you do this is because the position of the weight behaves differently relative to its distance from the crankshaft pin. Weight on the big end has less of an effect than if there's extra weight on the pin bore. The best balanced engines have every part of the piston and rod assemblies balanced separately within .1 grams using the method I just described, and not the method shown in this video. The method shown here involves weighing ALL of the piston and rod assembly components together, and then taking out the difference just on the casting lines of the connecting rod. They were already off-balance and had never been balanced before. This is an improvement, not perfection. It's still something this engine needed to have done. I'm not using the big-end/small-end method here because these pistons are pressed-on and if I try to remove them from the rod, it will shatter the piston skirts. No thank you. I'm not replacing these pistons. The reason I grind down the casting lines is because it's weight is in a neutral territory, extending from the big end to the small end. It's easier to take an even amount off when you grind across the entire length of the rods. This method leaves a lot up to assumption as there's no way to determine which end of the rod is heavier, or if the weight is in a wrist pin or piston. All this does is ensure the crankshaft is spinning an even amount of weight on all 4 of its rod journals. Grams of weight turn into pounds of force at idle speeds. My goal is to remove that vibration at any and all rotations per minute if I can. So I make them all the same within 1.0 grams of their combined weight. If you're assembling and balancing all NEW parts, not parts that have worn together and need to go back in the same holes... you will have to balance the individual parts and pieces. This is the poor man's method. Even with the new parts you still do the poor man's method once you're done balancing the individual parts and assemble them, but sometimes when you're lucky with the new parts, you can just swap around the rods, pins and fasteners to balance the weights on each assembly and not have to grind anything at all. That's awfully nice when that happens. You know the Hyundai won't let me get away with that. Removing stress risers might help strengthen the rods, but it's not what I'm after here or else I would have removed the whole casting line from all of them. These rods should be fine for my goals. My goal is to remove just enough from all of the fatter rods (weight wise) to match the lightest one. Balancing an inline 4 engine with a flat-plane crank is easy if you have already balanced the crankshaft. This crank was already balanced for the GSX motor on a previous occasion. It's zero'd out. In order to balance the rotating assembly, all you do is make the piston and rod assemblies weigh identically to its neighbors. Just 3 grams of weight can produce over a hundred pounds of lateral forces at red-line so this is an aspect of engine building that you should not overlook. All you need to do is get all of them within 1 gram. The scale I'm using measures whole grams, so that's all I can do anyway. This method is acceptable for balancing a rotating assembly as long as you're smart about how to remove the weight.





How to Turbo - Part 1
After buying a Euro car last episode, Marty discovers he has not yet found his perfect vehicle... In this extended episode, we reveal what he got, and show how to make it faster. Wanna show the world that you fix your own shizzle? MCM stickers, ti shirts and other mad shizuoika available here: http://www.mightycarmods.com/collections/all Official Site: http://www.mightycarmods.com Forum: http://forums.mightycarmods.com Music from the episode is available here: http://www.mightycarmods.com/collections/music (Forced Induction by MOOG was featured in this episode) Also something to note around Mighty Car Mods: we are normal guys and are not trained mechanics. We like to make interesting car mods and show you how we've gone about it, but we can't promise that anything we show you will work for your particular car, or that you won't harm yourself, someone else, your car or your warranty doing it. Please be safe, be responsible and unless you know what you're doing, do not fool around with very serious machinery just because you've seen us make it look so easy. Talk to a qualified mechanic if you are in any doubt.





Cylinder Head 206 - Valve Clearance (& LSA)
This video is the companion and continuation video for Cylinder Head 205. In Cylinder Head 205 we covered the tools and technique for setting valve timing versus the factory-recommended specifications. It didn't work, thus; this video. How do I know it didn't work? Watch this video. The reason this is a companion video is because anyone changing their valve timing must also CHECK their valve clearance or risk bending valves. If I can install aftermarket cams, then I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I move cam gears on an engine that was previously running, then I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I have milled my head or block, I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I have installed larger valves, I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. Mitsubishi doesn't build a whole lot of wiggle room into their valvetrains. They keep the valves pretty tight to maximize performance and a 4g63 IS an interference engine. Note that if you follow the recommendations in this video and damage your valvetrain that I am not responsible. Here I demonstrate all of the techniques to ensure that damage never occurs because these tests are performed PRIOR to the engine ever starting, and prove that clearance is adequate for THE PARTS I SHOW HERE ON CAMERA. There can be components installed in other rotating assemblies that require additional clearance to be built into your valve clearance such as aluminum rods, or other alloys employed in the casting and forging of rotating assembly parts and valves. I strongly urge you to check with those manufacturers for their recommendations regarding thermal expansion, stretch, bounce rocker gap or float prior to making any adjustments, and use this video only as a documentation of my experience. In other words, it's my opinion. What works in your engine will likely be very different from mine, but the tests and the math shown here will work the same with your build. To find your intake valve clearance... Add your intake valve opening degrees (btdc) to your intake valve closing degrees (abdc) to 180°. IO + IC + 180 = DURATION DURATION ÷ 2 = LOBE CENTERLINE LOBE CENTERLINE - IO = INSTALLED INTAKE CENTERLINE To find your Exhaust valve clearance... Add your Exhaust valve opening degrees (bbdc) to your intake valve closing degrees (atdc) to 180°. EO + EC + 180 = DURATION DURATION ÷ 2 = LOBE CENTERLINE LOBE CENTERLINE - EC = INSTALLED Exhaust CENTERLINE To get your Lobe Separation Angle, ADD your INSTALLED INTAKE CENTERLINE to your INSTALLED Exhaust CENTERLINE and divide that result by 2. Intake Centerline + Exhaust Centerline ÷ 2 = LSA Tight Lobe Separation Angles * MOVE TORQUE LOWER IN THE POWER BAND * INCREASE MAXIMUM TORQUE OUTPUT * INCREASE CYLINDER PRESSURE * INCREASE CRANKING COMPRESSION * INCREASE EFFECTIVE COMPRESSION * INCREASE COMBUSTION CHAMBER SCAVENGING EFFECT * SHORTEN YOUR POWER BAND * REDUCE IDLE VACUUM! * REDUCE IDLE STABILITY * INCREASE LIKELIHOOD OF KNOCK! * INCREASE OVERLAP * DECREASE PISTON TO VALVE CLEARANCE! Wide Lobe Separation Angles * MOVE TORQUE HIGHER IN THE POWER BAND * DECREASE MAXIMUM TORQUE OUTPUT * LENGTHEN YOUR POWER BAND * DECREASE CYLINDER PRESSURE * DECREASE LIKELIHOOD OF KNOCK * DECREASE CRANKING COMPRESSION * DECREASE EFFECTIVE COMPRESSION * INCREASE IDLE VACUUM * IMPROVE IDLE STABILITY * DECREASE OVERLAP * DECREASE COMBUSTION CHAMBER SCAVENGING EFFECT * INCREASE PISTON TO VALVE CLEARANCE There's more that I want to say about Lobe Separation Angle (LSA). If you're tuning a DOHC engine with cam gears, you're very lucky to go through all this trouble. The pushrod and SOHC crowd can't change their lobe separation angles without replacing their camshaft, and on many engines that means removing the cylinder heads. On a 4g63 with adjustable gears, you loosen the lock bolts, turn, lock it back down and you've adjusted your LSA. This is a luxury which if you've never had to build a SOHC or a pushrod engine and install camshafts that you take for granted. DOHC tuning permits the ability to alter the opening and closing events of the valves independently of one another and perfect the valve timing during tuning without having to completely remove and replace the valvetrain. What this also means is that the pushrod crowd needs to know and understand a lot more about their camshaft profiles prior to making their purchase as we [the DOHC crowd] do. They have to be on their A-game when they drop the coin on a new cam or else things get expensive really quick. Lobe separation angle says more about how camshafts behave than duration and lift, but all 3 should be carefully scrutinized when you're making that determination. Yes, I did actually animate my engine's valve timing exactly the way HKS said to set it up. Yes those are all actual photos of my parts. Yes that was the biggest Photoshop file I've ever created.





GSX RC 750cc Fuel Injector upgrade
I bought a set of RC PL4-750 injectors. I needed 'em. I had RC 550cc's in this thing and managed to crank out 357awhp pretty consistently. But I've restarted my tuning from scratch in preparation for something interesting coming soon. I know the tune on the car right now is balled. I started over. No point in re-tuning for the same hardware. If you want to read more about the theory behind these preliminary stages, I've included it below. I'll make a video about it later. Right now the status is... my MAF is calibrated... I have yet to check for Boost leaks... and as for how the injectors turned out?.... You'll have to watch what's next. Tuning poop: All of my tuning adjustments have been made to the airflow tables by calibrating the BoostEstimate value in DSMlink against actual logged Boost from an AEM 3.5bar MAP sensor. A stock MAF sensor has a temperature sensor in it. A GM MAF sensor does not. Using a GM MAF clamps the intake temperature at 80° no matter what they really are, this makes air mass calculations a little more difficult. Without the intake air temperature sensor, the GM part is never calibrated correctly for use on a DSM. GM cars have a separate IAT sensor so they don't have this kind of issue. Their ECU will correct for the sensor's behavior based on air temperature. My configure relies alternatively on an air pressure value. By calibrating airflow tables (maf correction) to bring BoostEst (an ECU estimated value) and actual logged Boost pressures dead-on... The air mass is being accurately metered, and as a result, it brings all the STFT and LTFT fuel trims to within 1% or less. That's the short explanation. It was tuned after achieving zero Boost leaks and a steady idle. I will be doing this again with the 750cc injectors after a healthy round of Boost leak testing, but some other things need to change first.





Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?




Similar 1/4 mile timeslips to browse:

1990 Audi Quattro Coupe Quattro: 9.342 @ 153.710
Aaron C, Engine: 20v 2.0L Integrated Engineering stroker 4cyl, Turbos: Borg Warner S400sx 67mm Billet divided T4 1.25 A/R Tires: 4 X M&H Racemaster 8.5/24.5-15 Drag Slicks


1990 Audi Quattro Coupe: 9.552 @ 150.900
Aaron C, Engine: 20v 2.0L Integrated Engineering stroker 4cyl, Turbos: Borg Warner S400sx 67mm Billet divided T4 1.25 A/R Tires: 4 X M&H Racemaster 8.5/24.5-15 Drag Slicks


1986 Audi Quattro SportQuattro: 9.630 @ 147.940
slobodan Kostic, Engine: 2.2l 20v 5cyl, Turbos: 1 Tires: 225 45 hoosier drag radial


1990 Audi Quattro CQ: 10.054 @ 138.690
Aaron, Engine: 1.8T 20v 06A INA Engineering shortblock, Turbos: Bullseye S366XL Divided inlet T4 1.00 A/R Tires: M&H Racemaster 24.5 x 8.5 / 15 Drag Slicks all fou


2012 Mercedes-Benz E550 Coupe: 12.428 @ 115.130
Keith, Tires: 255/30 Front, 285/25 Rear


2012 Mercedes-Benz E550 Coupe: 12.631 @ 111.130
Keith, Tires: Bridgestone Potenza S04 Pole Position


2013 Mercedes-Benz E550 4 Matic: 12.864 @ 109.800
John Nouri Broadway Performance,


1990 Pontiac Sunbird le: 12.940 @ 114.000
frank strutzke, Engine: 3.8 buick 111 block, Turbos: holset hx35 Tires: 215 60 14 bf goodrich radial ta


2007 Mercedes-Benz E550 4-Matic: 13.170 @ 110.090
Mike, Engine: 5.5L,


2010 Mercedes-Benz E550 Coupe: 13.310 @ 108.020
NA, Engine: V8: 382HP,


2007 Mercedes-Benz E550 Sport: 13.365 @ 105.250
Steve Bland, Engine: 5.5L,


2007 Mercedes-Benz E550 : 13.410 @ 106.020
NA, Tires: Contenintal ContiProContact


2008 Mercedes-Benz E550 : 13.410 @ 105.360
NA, Engine: V8, Tires: Continental ContiProContact


2007 Mercedes-Benz E550 4 matic: 13.790 @ 101.630
Peter,


1994 Pontiac Sunbird LE 2 door: 15.225 @ 86.715
Cecil, Engine: 3.1L MPFI V6, Tires: 205-60R15 BFGoodrich


1990 Audi Quattro 20V: 15.550 @ 89.300
Tsivas Kourtsounis, Engine: 2.3L 20V, Tires: 205/55 Yokohama AVS Sports


1993 Pontiac Sunbird LE 2 dr: 18.300 @ 74.000
Chris, Engine: 2.0 MPI F1, Supercharger: no Turbos: no Tires: Horizon 195 60 r14


1993 Pontiac Sunbird LE: 19.100 @ 63.000
Adam, Engine: 2.0, Tires: 19/65/15's


 


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