Drag Racing 1/4 Mile times 0-60 Dyno Fast Cars Muscle Cars

Installing an eBay 20g

I'm reviewing an ebay 20g TD05 internally-gated turbocharger. You've seen me open it, assess it, and port it. Now I'm going to install it and see how it fits on my car. Its dimensions are close enough to a Mitsubishi turbo that it fits well, but it didn't play nice with my aftermarket stuff as the video illustrates. You'll see what I mean... The wastegate actuator nipple aims straight toward the compressor housing, and I don't like it. I fixed it with a pair of pliers and an allen wrench at 5:55 in a way that's far less likely to break it. The flanges and bolt centers lined up fine and without any issues, though others have claimed to have had them with this turbo. The compressor cover is an obvious giveaway regarding identifying this turbo. It does not wear the cast-in designation TD05H that the Mitsubishi turbos do, but for $228, what do you expect? If you chose to go this route, just manage your expectations. Be aware that it might not bolt up perfectly to your particular car, and be willing to fix what isn't perfect.


 


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First ebay 20g drag passes
I made 2 passes. On the first one, nearly everything that could go wrong did. But I'm a persistent bastard. I fixed it all, found everybody and then made this run. It wasn't until after I got home that I realized I had no in-car video footage of the first run when I broke despite having set it up... I kicked the alternator belt off no-lift-to-shifting into 4th gear around 800 feet and coasted to a 13.3 at 82mph against a 10 second Mustang. Overheating with no power steering I limped it back and put the belt back on, only burning myself 9 times, and then got back out and made this run. The guys in front of us broke, too. I guess it was contagious?

This run is on 93 octane pump gas.

I shouldn't have been in such a hurry. It left me a little unprepared. You learn things about other things while doing things--is the best I can explain it. It didn't knock at all, so clearly the new injectors are working fine... but I didn't take time to burp the coolant system, so it ran hot. My alternator belt was loose, and it bailed on me. I was focusing on explaining the video (I deleted that scene from frustration) rather than putting the car back together, and failed to plug in a very important sensor. I would have caught it, but didn't get a chance to look at the logs until I got home. I have to operate so many pieces of equipment in addition to actually driving that it's very distracting.

The guy in my second race had a beautiful 1967 Dodge Dart, and he was a very good sport! It was a great race where adrenaline is involved, and I was focused but wary of whether or not the alternator belt would stay on. I really appreciate the guys that keep old muscle alive. That car's almost 50 years old. That's making history right there... He cut a great 60 foot after they cleaned up the track, but I wish that car didn't break in his lane prior to his pass if it was a problem for his run.

I tried to leave nothing out and keep it short & sweet. I was lucky to have a track-side cameraman for the second race. Thanks Taylor! Having that sensor plugged in would have left me much more confident in the log data and offer a much better assessment of this turbo, but it is what it is. Here it is...





How to port and polish a turbo exhaust housing
I'll fill this in later. The "book" I typed in this field before didn't save. Come back later if you want to read more about the theories behind porting and polishing.





Garage Modification 3
For those of you that read video info... I made YouTube Partnership 2 weeks ago. It's taken almost 3 years an over 4000 hours of work, but I made it! Thank you for your support, time, comments, ratings and generosity! Thank you for helping me cross the half-million view mark and more than 1500 subscribers! The growth my channel has experienced is both flattering and unexpected. I'm just a random guy doing what I [usually] love to do and filming it. I'm grateful to everyone who favorites my videos and also helped your subscribers find me. Those who posted my videos in forums... Just... Thank you! Whether or not what I do helps you build a better car, you're helping me to build a better cars in many different ways, and there's no greater gift you could give to a guy like me. What this video is about? I've run out of space. I like efficiency. I'm saving energy and adding comfort to a room I spend a LOT of time in. The shelves I bought were nearly $100 each, and I figured I could buy enough material to finish an attic in my garage for less than half of that and end up with far more storage. That's what this is. I got a little sidetracked from just finishing the walls, I'll admit, but I'm really happy with the results! I vinyl-wrapped the attic insulation for an additional vapor barrier, to keep the attic insulation up (because it was starting to sag), and for added R-value. It made a HUGE difference! Especially the added ceiling. Now on an overcast day when it's over 90° F outside, I can get the garage down to 65°-66°F with just a window unit. Almost there. I'm using 19/32" OSB particle board for everything because sheet rock is just too delicate for the kind of mechanic I am. It costs the same but is far more durable than drywall. Yes, I eyeballed lots of stuff and nailed it because that's how I roll. I've knocked out the section in the corner behind the compressor, the corner behind the workbench, the back wall, and installed conduit for future upgrades. Where I'm at with the garage right now allows me to now put a car back inside. I've got one wall and a workbench left to finish, but that's going to wait a bit for now. It's going to be a big job that I need to gather things for, and I need to get some other videos up here first for the faithful. I made and posted this just because I want you to know that progress is being made for the sake of the channel, also to improve the scenery because 1080HD isn't kind, and to show why I've been "gone" for so long. This video spans over 40 hours of work because a lot of it happened off-camera gathering materials and doing math. It took eleven 85 minute HDV tapes, 2.7 TB of disk space total just to make a 817 MB flattened movie. RojoDelChocolate once again comes through with a dynamite audio track for the occasion. The disco ball is courtesy of my previous bachelor pad, and desperately needs to be connected to a garage door opener.





2g GSX How-To: Attempting turbo swap with WTF ending
Okay. Now I've seen it all. There's an old adage that states "if you want something done right, you have to do it yourself". Well, this video both confirms and debunks that theory. A lot of that depends on each person's definition of "done right". You can't do things by-the-book with aftermarket hardware. Sheldon bought this car with a pretty full mod list and it ran great at the time, but by the time we got it to the track, we couldn't beat a 16-second pass. Despite the laundry list of troubleshooting we both attempted to do through tuning and testing, we couldn't determine why it was around 4 seconds slower than it should be running. I started having doubts that a "ported T-28" was what was on the car, and there's no easy way to tell them apart without removing it so we opted to install a 14b... since plenty of people easily run 13's with them. Stick around for the plot twist.





Trans & Clutch 4 - Installing The Clutch
What you wanted to know about clutches but were afraid to ask. I'm putting a ACT MB1-XTSS on the car in this video. Step height, clutch dowell pins, bolt part numbers, alignment and various clutch parts are described in this video. It's part of an all-inclusive drivetrain tech piece I'm working on that's broken up into sections to maintain focus on the individual processes involved.





Honda ebay review
This is a review about ebay and their products, I ran a little about how nobody wants to try anything but yet they want to knock it.. And for all the haters there is something special at the end for you ;)





Calculate Your Compression Ratio
This is everything you need to do to calculate your compression ratio. No foolin'. Every equation and process demonstrated. Find all your variables. Know your exact compression ratio in every cylinder. This is how you do it. Just because your service manual says your car is 7.8:1 or 8.5:1 compression doesn't mean that it is. Whenever there are casting irregularities, variations in piston height, parts that have been machined, non-OE parts, or changes to your head gasket selection, your compression ratio WILL change. It's highly probable that you're only CLOSE to spec if you've never touched your engine at all since it was "born", and that it doesn't MATCH spec. Even if it did, how would you know? This. 5 variables. V1 Swept Volume V2 Deck Volume V3 Piston-to-deck clearance V4 Piston dish cc's V5 Head combustion chamber cc's The ratio math: V1+V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at BDC V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at TDC The ratio is... (V1+V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) : (V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) or BDC ÷ TDC : TDC ÷ TDC First you fill in the variables, then you calculate volumes, then you add the volumes, then you reduce the ratio (fraction). It's that easy. Here are your magic numbers: 0.7854 = Pi quartered to the ten thousandth 16.387 = number of cc's in a cubic inch. If you divide any number in cc's by 16.387 it gives you inches. If you multiply any number in cubic inches by 16.387 it gives you cc's. Quartering pi lets you use the calculation: BORE x BORE x STROKE x .7854 = volume of a cylinder instead of... π x (BORE ÷ 2) x (BORE ÷ 2) x STROKE = volume of a cylinder Either way is right. You get the same result if you calculate pi to the ten thousandth. While I apologize for all the math, no I don't. I'm really not sorry. You actually clicked here for it whether you realize it or not. This is ALL the math, the tests, and the whole process to calculate your cylinder volumes and compression individually even if you don't know any of your variables yet. All of my numbers are present for those who want to calculate out the last 3 cylinders out of curiosity just to see how it affects cylinder volumes and compression ratios from one cylinder to the next. Why would I do that for you? Why would I deprive you of that practice? Just assume that all 4 of my combustion chambers are 41.75 ml if you do this. Clicking like share and subscribe helps a channel grow. It also motivates me. Don't sweat the camera. It's enough to know that so many of you care about what I'm doing here. From the bottom of my atmospheric dump, I thank you all! This gift horse's teeth are all over the place, but he sometimes poops gold nuggets. PS: Use ATF for your piston dish volume tests, not alcohol. Of course it's better just to use the spec sheet included with your pistons... but not everyone gets that luxury. Water is just fine for head combustion chamber tests. Dry and re-oil all parts that water touches.





Cylinder Head 206 - Valve Clearance (& LSA)
This video is the companion and continuation video for Cylinder Head 205. In Cylinder Head 205 we covered the tools and technique for setting valve timing versus the factory-recommended specifications. It didn't work, thus; this video. How do I know it didn't work? Watch this video. The reason this is a companion video is because anyone changing their valve timing must also CHECK their valve clearance or risk bending valves. If I can install aftermarket cams, then I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I move cam gears on an engine that was previously running, then I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I have milled my head or block, I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I have installed larger valves, I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. Mitsubishi doesn't build a whole lot of wiggle room into their valvetrains. They keep the valves pretty tight to maximize performance and a 4g63 IS an interference engine. Note that if you follow the recommendations in this video and damage your valvetrain that I am not responsible. Here I demonstrate all of the techniques to ensure that damage never occurs because these tests are performed PRIOR to the engine ever starting, and prove that clearance is adequate for THE PARTS I SHOW HERE ON CAMERA. There can be components installed in other rotating assemblies that require additional clearance to be built into your valve clearance such as aluminum rods, or other alloys employed in the casting and forging of rotating assembly parts and valves. I strongly urge you to check with those manufacturers for their recommendations regarding thermal expansion, stretch, bounce rocker gap or float prior to making any adjustments, and use this video only as a documentation of my experience. In other words, it's my opinion. What works in your engine will likely be very different from mine, but the tests and the math shown here will work the same with your build. To find your intake valve clearance... Add your intake valve opening degrees (btdc) to your intake valve closing degrees (abdc) to 180°. IO + IC + 180 = DURATION DURATION ÷ 2 = LOBE CENTERLINE LOBE CENTERLINE - IO = INSTALLED INTAKE CENTERLINE To find your Exhaust valve clearance... Add your Exhaust valve opening degrees (bbdc) to your intake valve closing degrees (atdc) to 180°. EO + EC + 180 = DURATION DURATION ÷ 2 = LOBE CENTERLINE LOBE CENTERLINE - EC = INSTALLED Exhaust CENTERLINE To get your Lobe Separation Angle, ADD your INSTALLED INTAKE CENTERLINE to your INSTALLED Exhaust CENTERLINE and divide that result by 2. Intake Centerline + Exhaust Centerline ÷ 2 = LSA Tight Lobe Separation Angles * MOVE TORQUE LOWER IN THE POWER BAND * INCREASE MAXIMUM TORQUE OUTPUT * INCREASE CYLINDER PRESSURE * INCREASE CRANKING COMPRESSION * INCREASE EFFECTIVE COMPRESSION * INCREASE COMBUSTION CHAMBER SCAVENGING EFFECT * SHORTEN YOUR POWER BAND * REDUCE IDLE VACUUM! * REDUCE IDLE STABILITY * INCREASE LIKELIHOOD OF KNOCK! * INCREASE OVERLAP * DECREASE PISTON TO VALVE CLEARANCE! Wide Lobe Separation Angles * MOVE TORQUE HIGHER IN THE POWER BAND * DECREASE MAXIMUM TORQUE OUTPUT * LENGTHEN YOUR POWER BAND * DECREASE CYLINDER PRESSURE * DECREASE LIKELIHOOD OF KNOCK * DECREASE CRANKING COMPRESSION * DECREASE EFFECTIVE COMPRESSION * INCREASE IDLE VACUUM * IMPROVE IDLE STABILITY * DECREASE OVERLAP * DECREASE COMBUSTION CHAMBER SCAVENGING EFFECT * INCREASE PISTON TO VALVE CLEARANCE There's more that I want to say about Lobe Separation Angle (LSA). If you're tuning a DOHC engine with cam gears, you're very lucky to go through all this trouble. The pushrod and SOHC crowd can't change their lobe separation angles without replacing their camshaft, and on many engines that means removing the cylinder heads. On a 4g63 with adjustable gears, you loosen the lock bolts, turn, lock it back down and you've adjusted your LSA. This is a luxury which if you've never had to build a SOHC or a pushrod engine and install camshafts that you take for granted. DOHC tuning permits the ability to alter the opening and closing events of the valves independently of one another and perfect the valve timing during tuning without having to completely remove and replace the valvetrain. What this also means is that the pushrod crowd needs to know and understand a lot more about their camshaft profiles prior to making their purchase as we [the DOHC crowd] do. They have to be on their A-game when they drop the coin on a new cam or else things get expensive really quick. Lobe separation angle says more about how camshafts behave than duration and lift, but all 3 should be carefully scrutinized when you're making that determination. Yes, I did actually animate my engine's valve timing exactly the way HKS said to set it up. Yes those are all actual photos of my parts. Yes that was the biggest Photoshop file I've ever created.





Basic AN Hose Tech - making AN hoses
I wasn't going to upload this for multiple reasons, but someone out there will find it useful. It's better to use real AN wrenches rather than the stuff I'm using in this video because they're less likely to scratch or mark up the anodized finish on your fittings. Some of the footage is out of focus or frame and I'm not to happy about that, but you can still tell what's going on and it's repetitive. But lastly, I wanted to try the brick-splitter method & I'm doing it wrong. Still, I hate that method. I linked to the proper way to use that method... to someone else's video at the end. I don't like that method because the edges don't "just straighten right out". The rubber lining on the inside usually gets cracked and it seems to stay football-shaped. Plus, making hoses is snooze material. It's monkey work. You do it once and you never forget how. The fittings that these things connect to, or the process of installing them on your car where you want to use these hoses is much more challenging, and interesting. Usually requires hunting down bastardized 3/4" BSP-to-AN and Metric-to-AN fittings or having to weld things. That's the fun part. Become familiar with Pegasus Auto Racing Supplies for some of that stuff, and the community of DSM tuners developing specialized adapters for others. www.ongreenperformance.com sells metric-to-8 AN fittings for the '90 oil filter housing. Pegasus Auto Racing Supplies sells some BSP fittings, but those things are hard to hunt down. The factory ones are tapered, but nobody sells tapered adapter fitting, they'll be straight-thread BSP, but they'll fit. They have a lot of other handy stuff like metric-to-? AN banjo bolts that fit turbine housings. Summit is where I got all my Russell hose ends, o-rings, cushion clamps, NPT tees, fuel filter, etc... I'm sure I have more than $500 worth of fittings throughout my car. Much more if you count shipping...





Hyundai 4g63 Assembly Part 3
I have bad news. The big camera's playback heads bit the dust from extensive prolonged use. I wore out the tape drive. No manner of cleaning tapes can fix what it's been through. I've talked many times about how much footage goes into one of my 15 to 30 minute videos, and for every hour of video footage I've shot, the camera does double-duty because after shooting, it has to be played back in real time during capture. I've done more than 130 videos this way, probably over 2000 hours of use in the harshest of environments, and it just couldn't handle it any longer. I shot several more tapes beyond what's in this video that I can't even import because the play heads failed. I don't know if any of that video even stuck to the tapes? The lost footage from the last video was an early and un-recognized sign of what was soon to come. I know I joked about it, but in reality it's really not very funny at all. I can't afford a backup for a piece of equipment like this, so it's something I don't have. As bad as this news might feel to you, I feel it 21,000 times over and I mean that. This couldn't come at a worse time and expense for me, and at a point where my production was really starting to wrap up on this project to move on to bigger and better things. It's the only camera I have that can do what I do here on this channel, so I'm forced to stop production for now. Even though my camera is huge, 7 year old HDV technology, these things still sell for several thousand dollars used because they record un-compressed video unlike every other flash storage based solution available at twice the price. 3CCD 1080/60i HD cameras that shoot to tape have advantages that you can't affordably achieve with solid-state media. I have to use un-compressed footage to do what I do here or else there's nothing left of the video quality after 7 exports and a final mpeg compression. The Sony Action Cam can't do it, we learned that in a previous test video. Even if it could, it can't do close-ups and everything's fisheyed. Buying a low-end 4K camera is impractical because I can't efficiently or effectively edit that video without a $9,000 computer. Jafromobile is just not that big of a channel, and I do this completely un-sponsored and at my own expense with the help of a handful of friends who volunteer their talent, time and information. It's the epitome of low-budget and what it earns still doesn't come close covering the channel's equipment and expenses as they occur. People have urged that I do a kickstarter, but I can't bring myself to ask for that from the community. I don't sell a product or offer services so there is no profit margin. I can't accept money for something that happens only at the speed of my available resources. To me, this channel is my proverbial gift horse to all of you. http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/don't_look_a_gift_horse_in_the_mouth I know what you're thinking and I realize this is a grim conclusion to this video. It sounds like I'm down for the count, but don't rush to the down vote button just yet. As of the upload date of this video, I'm paying out of pocket to fix a ridiculously expensive 3CCD 1080HD broadcast quality video camera so that these projects can resume, and so that I can bring the final assembly steps to you in the same quality you've grown used to seeing here on Jafromobile. If I wear out a camera every 3 years, then so be it. This is love, and no expense is too great. The big camera is being fixed by its manufacturer, and I'm expecting the repair to cost as much as replacing it. I sincerely hope that's not the case. Hopefully my production only has to take a short break. Once production resumes and I can import these tapes, I've got some really awesome stuff coming up and I hope every last one of you is here to see it. I may have a few other backlogged nuggets I can upload, and as always I'm happy to discuss this in the comments and provide updates on the repair as I get them. Update: Awaiting quote due by 5/16 according to the repair agreement. 5/9/2014 9:17:00 AM DELIVERED NEWPORT NEWS, VA US 5/9/2014 5:36:00 AM DESTINATION SCAN NEWPORT NEWS, VA US 5/9/2014 12:04:00 AM ARRIVAL SCAN NEWPORT NEWS, VA US 5/12/2014 - Repair paid in full $440. Far less than I was expecting. I'm glad they still make parts for 7 year old professional equipment. Thank You Canon, USA! Repair should be complete within 7 business days from receipt of payment. The quote only took them 24 hours and they quoted a week just for the estimate, so at this rate I should be back up and running once again very soon. Thank ALL of you for your kind words, HUGE generosity, and all of the moral support. I swear I have the best subscribers on YouTube!





"Fix" J-pipe for ebay 20g
HI KIDS!!!!! Here's what I did to make the 20g work with all my aftermarket stuff. All I had to modify was the J-pipe. No aftermarket pipes would work because they wouldn't point towards my lower Intercooler pipe. This car is equipped with a short-route pipe kit with an unusual set of custom pipes. You'll see how to mark a piece to be welded, and you'll need to be resourceful if you don't have a welder that works on what your pipes are made out of. This thing fits perfectly now. This leaves me unable to really blame the turbo for the fit because this J-pipe's always been a bastard. I need a TIG welder BAD! Thanks Ronnie! This was 50¢ holding up a dollar, and I appreciate the skill. ...and THANKS AGAIN RojoDelChocolate!





Cylinder Head 205 - Degree DOHC Camshafts
This video is all about establishing your valve timing baseline, and adjusting your camshafts to the manufacturer's spec. It's only ONE of several steps that should be performed when you're assembling your engine on an engine stand. Establishing these conditions with accuracy while your engine installed in the car is a near-impossibility, and the reason why... is demonstrated in this video. There are several challenges to overcome when performing these procedures on a 4gxx series Mitsubishi engine, and they're all defeated here. The cylinder head used in this video is a J1 spec '92 Hyundai Elantra small-combustion chamber head which has had several valve jobs and has been resurfaced multiple times by budget engine remanufacturers who didn't care about quality control, as well as performance shops who do. It has had no less than .040" removed from the head gasket surface, the valves are recessed because of all the valve jobs performed, and at some point when it was cut, it wasn't level. Removing material from the deck surface will change the installed camshaft centerline, and that will change your engine's valve timing events even if all other parts remain the same. I would claim this is a multi-part video except that I've got the videos broken up by topic already, and this one is all about setting your cams to the manufacturer's specification. It is not the end of testing that will be performed with these tools. The basics concerning the process and tool fabrication are covered here. Further discussion on this topic concerning the effects of advancing or retarding camshafts from spec, and for checking your valve clearance will be in the videos that follow. I had to end this video after the manufacturer's spec was achieved to make it easier to digest, and because it would have created a video greater than one hour in length despite the break-neck speeds that things happen here on Jafromobile. Where your cams are set determine how the swept volume of the combustion chamber gets used. The information on the manufacturer's spec sheet is their recommendation for baseline settings that will help you get the most out of those camshafts. Whether or not your engine can operate with those specifications without additional hardware or without causing a catastrophic failure will be expanded upon in Cylinder Head 206. The next video should be used as a companion to this video because establishing the manufacturer's baseline is not the end of the assembly or testing process. It's only half the battle. Should you be lucky enough to find your combination of parts allow your camshafts to fit and requires no additional adjustment after assembly, the steps in this video and in Cylinder Head 206 should still be performed if you are doing the assembly yourself. Failure to inspect these variables may lead to a tuning nightmare once the engine is back in the car, hard starts, or worse... bent valves and damaged wrist pins. Making these tools and performing these steps will give you the peace of mind to know with certainty that your engine is operating safely at its peak performance.





Hyundai Assembly 4 - Balancing Rods
I edited this video to its finished state, and RojoDelChocolate handed me a track with no collaboration that was the right length and rhythm. I literally did nothing to the video once the audio track was dropped in, and that's just how it went. I can't believe it. It's like when you're pumping gas into a Ford F150 full-blast and release the pump handle to stop right on $80.00 even. He's got more musical talent in his pinky fingernail than I have mechanical ability in my spleen, appendix and tonsils combined. Thank you RojoDelChocolate. Here I'm cleaning up the fly cuts, balancing the piston and rod assemblies and preparing to double-check my valve clearance. I had to start by cleaning up and re-lubricating every part that was removed to prevent contamination of the assembly. This is the tedious part of doing the job right. We learned that this whole engine assembly was pretty far-gone in previous videos, way past its service limits, so making it fit and work again takes extensive testing, machining, and re-testing to ensure all of the parts fit. This is likely the most challenging build I will perform on any car in my driveway. It has been so far. But because I have not demonstrated the basics of engine balancing beyond what a machine shop has to do to zero balance a flat-plane crankshaft, I thought I'd give it its own video right here with one of the test assemblies. When you balance rods by themselves, you balance the big-end and the pin-bore separately. You get weights of both ends of the rod using a jig and a process that I don't demonstrate in this video. The reason you do this is because the position of the weight behaves differently relative to its distance from the crankshaft pin. Weight on the big end has less of an effect than if there's extra weight on the pin bore. The best balanced engines have every part of the piston and rod assemblies balanced separately within .1 grams using the method I just described, and not the method shown in this video. The method shown here involves weighing ALL of the piston and rod assembly components together, and then taking out the difference just on the casting lines of the connecting rod. They were already off-balance and had never been balanced before. This is an improvement, not perfection. It's still something this engine needed to have done. I'm not using the big-end/small-end method here because these pistons are pressed-on and if I try to remove them from the rod, it will shatter the piston skirts. No thank you. I'm not replacing these pistons. The reason I grind down the casting lines is because it's weight is in a neutral territory, extending from the big end to the small end. It's easier to take an even amount off when you grind across the entire length of the rods. This method leaves a lot up to assumption as there's no way to determine which end of the rod is heavier, or if the weight is in a wrist pin or piston. All this does is ensure the crankshaft is spinning an even amount of weight on all 4 of its rod journals. Grams of weight turn into pounds of force at idle speeds. My goal is to remove that vibration at any and all rotations per minute if I can. So I make them all the same within 1.0 grams of their combined weight. If you're assembling and balancing all NEW parts, not parts that have worn together and need to go back in the same holes... you will have to balance the individual parts and pieces. This is the poor man's method. Even with the new parts you still do the poor man's method once you're done balancing the individual parts and assemble them, but sometimes when you're lucky with the new parts, you can just swap around the rods, pins and fasteners to balance the weights on each assembly and not have to grind anything at all. That's awfully nice when that happens. You know the Hyundai won't let me get away with that. Removing stress risers might help strengthen the rods, but it's not what I'm after here or else I would have removed the whole casting line from all of them. These rods should be fine for my goals. My goal is to remove just enough from all of the fatter rods (weight wise) to match the lightest one. Balancing an inline 4 engine with a flat-plane crank is easy if you have already balanced the crankshaft. This crank was already balanced for the GSX motor on a previous occasion. It's zero'd out. In order to balance the rotating assembly, all you do is make the piston and rod assemblies weigh identically to its neighbors. Just 3 grams of weight can produce over a hundred pounds of lateral forces at red-line so this is an aspect of engine building that you should not overlook. All you need to do is get all of them within 1 gram. The scale I'm using measures whole grams, so that's all I can do anyway. This method is acceptable for balancing a rotating assembly as long as you're smart about how to remove the weight.





Turbo Exhaust Manifold Swap #2
I'm at it again... I finally got it right. There's been a lot of foreshadowing concerning this video. The other manifold swapping video was named Number 1. That's probably the most obvious one. Other blatant hints are the instances of a Forced Performance box on my workbench in the background of a few scenes from months ago and me saying I'd open it later. Well, it was un-coated. I finally got it ceramic coated because I thought I could hear an Exhaust leak and figured that would be a great way to fix it... I was wrong. Er... no, I still have an Exhaust leak, but at least I know it's not the manifold. Probably the downpipe. I'll figure it out. I did the audio track in this video. You can tell.





2g 7-bolt 4g63 Engine Removal & Disassembly
Tearing down the GSX to see what broke, and what I need to buy. Sitting for a year and letting the battery drain took a toll on the polished finish... and it looks like a piece of 4th gear wanted to take a look at the outside world. Holy transmission case, and it's off to TRE to see what's salvageable. Looks like the clutch could stand to be replaced, too. Timing belt has taken some abuse from the higher rev limit and I was expecting that. EGT probe is fried and I don't even care. Since I'm running DSMlink and can log Boost, I'm removing all my gauges anyway. Front case seal (freeze plug) is leaking a tad, and the crank seal shows signs of excessive crankcase pressure. I'm going to make some changes... I've got a lot of other tricks up my sleeve, so stay tuned.




Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?





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mike robinson, Engine: 300, Turbos: to4b Tires: mt drag radial


1970 Ford Maverick : 11.006 @ 118.000
Steve Huff, Engine: 302, Tires: MT 28.5 X 15 rear


2007 Triumph Speed triple 1050: 11.218 @ 123.930
Jaren Willey,


2006 Triumph Speed Triple: 11.340 @ 122.810
Craig,


1995 Buell S2 : 11.370 @ 120.930
B. Morvant,


2003 Triumph Speed Triple: 11.390 @ 119.400
Chris,


1999 Triumph Speed Triple: 11.409 @ 116.740
Sam Collier, Engine: 3 cyl 955,


2006 Triumph Speed Triple: 11.464 @ 120.280
Will,


1970 Ford Maverick : 11.670 @ 116.450
Justin Minzenmayer, Engine: 302, Tires: 28x12.50 MT


1991 Nissan Sentra s er: 11.720 @ 117.000
david, Engine: sr20det, Turbos: t3/t4


1970 Ford Maverick : 11.750 @ 113.000
Dustin Thacker, Engine: 347, Supercharger: no Turbos: no Tires: E/T Drag 28x9x15


2002 Nissan Sentra spec-v: 12.091 @ 120.000
alex, Engine: qr25det, Supercharger: - Turbos: borgwarner bullseye power Tires: MT24.5x8x15 drag slicks


1972 Ford Maverick : 12.310 @ 108.000
Tyler Shallenburger, Engine: 302, Supercharger: n/a Turbos: n/a Tires: sportsman fronts et street rear


1970 Ford Maverick Grabber: 12.650 @ 108.000
Lance Theaderman, Engine: 5.0L, Tires: M/T Drag Radials


 


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