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Installing an eBay 20g

I'm reviewing an ebay 20g TD05 internally-gated turbocharger. You've seen me open it, assess it, and port it. Now I'm going to install it and see how it fits on my car. Its dimensions are close enough to a Mitsubishi turbo that it fits well, but it didn't play nice with my aftermarket stuff as the video illustrates. You'll see what I mean... The wastegate actuator nipple aims straight toward the compressor housing, and I don't like it. I fixed it with a pair of pliers and an allen wrench at 5:55 in a way that's far less likely to break it. The flanges and bolt centers lined up fine and without any issues, though others have claimed to have had them with this turbo. The compressor cover is an obvious giveaway regarding identifying this turbo. It does not wear the cast-in designation TD05H that the Mitsubishi turbos do, but for $228, what do you expect? If you chose to go this route, just manage your expectations. Be aware that it might not bolt up perfectly to your particular car, and be willing to fix what isn't perfect.


 


More Videos...


Hyundai Elantra 4g63 Shortblock Assembly
HOLD ON TIGHT! HERE WE GO! We begin the blueprint and assembly on my 1992 Hyundai Elantra's bastardized 4g63. The parts used in this are from a mash of different brands and models outside of the typical 2.0L 4g63, but the specs and standards I am following for its assembly are for the 2.0L DOHC. If you want to follow along in your service manual to verify what I've done here in this video, the processes we cover here detail pages 11C-95 through 11C-105 of the 1g Overhaul manual. I would prefer you not rip them from the binding and throw them away, relying only on this video for instruction... but rather use this video as a motivational guide, and as a demonstration of the techniques involved in those sections. You gotta do the cooking by the book. I never had any intention of making instructional videos on this particular car, but after it blew up I slowly realized it's actually a better case study for how a 4g63 ticks than anything else in my driveway. There are several reasons for this. One being that it's a mix of parts that shouldn't be bolted together, and the other is that many of you watching my videos aren't trying to build a 600hp engine out of aftermarket parts. You're trying to put back together what used to be your daily driver. This car covers those bases. Don't think for a second I won't go through this same trouble and level of detail for the GSX. I will. When I do, having this information in this video will give you a better understanding on how and why I do things the way I do when I get there. This was the shortest I could condense this video. I've never uploaded a video this long, and I hope I never have to do it again. It took a month to create on cutting-edge equipment, 16 hours to export, and 9 hours for YouTube to process. My script for the voiceover is 6 times longer than the whole script for the movie Pootie Tang. 6 times. Longer. Than a Hollywood movie.





4g63 Block Cleanup & Oil System Mods
With no data other than another person's testimony and from observing the condition of failed rod bearings I was able to determine this engine suffered problems from high oil pressure. There are 3 modifications that wanted to perform to its oil system, and 2 parts I chose to replace. All of the videos that go into greater detail about these modifications and parts are linked from this video. Though I've covered these topics, this is a video of the work being done to the Hyundai because it's part of its mod list. Also in the process I've stripped and removed all gaskets in preparation for parts washing. All of these tasks can be completed without an air compressor by taking your time with a razor blade or using electric grinding tools. If you're doing this kind of work, I strongly suggest for time's sake that you use an air compressor. If you have access to an air compressor and any of these [cheap] tools, then you can do these kinds of modifications for less than $20. NAPA sells everything but the spudger (below) individually so there's no need to buy these consumable supplies in bulk. 3m bristle discs: http://lmgtfy.com/?q=3m+roloc+bristle+disc I used this cleaning up the oil pan. It's a spudger. An electronics tool. http://lmgtfy.com/?q=spudger I also used 3m Scotch Brite wheels to clean the oil pan's gasket surface. http://lmgtfy.com/?q=roloc+3m+scotch+brite+wheel+mmm7486





More ebay 20g drag passes
Trolled by mother nature. I thought plugging in my o2 sensor might make a difference. Scarily that's not how things worked out. My fuel trims are all jacked up with or without it. Airflow counts are down. I have more to do to this thing, but in an effort to keep things real, I'm uploading what happened and what I found in the logs. The PRIMARY reason for racing is development of both self and your equipment. If your goal is to have an awesome street car, you can't fully-achieve that goal without rigorous testing where numbers and facts are clearly evident. You JUST CAN'T do that on the STREET. There are no numbers on the street, no measurement of a baseline nor any improvements you might make. There's no measurement of a drivers' skill outside of, "did you win or didn't you?" I didn't come to the track with the expectation of MY driving needing to be improved. I was simply getting numbers, so I wasn't a tree-nazi like I was in the Friday Night No-Lift-To-Shift video. There was more incentive for me to just not red-light and see what she'll do. This evening I didn't feel like the track crew were on their A-game. Sometimes they held staged cars for an inordinately long period of time... which once I'm staged, I'm on the rev limiter, and once they left me there awaiting the tree for over 20 seconds, heating my car up and leaving me disadvantaged out of the hole. Other times they treated the starting lanes, dried off my opponent's side but not mine, not giving instruction to hold or wait. In fact, one guy was signaling me forward while another crew member was standing in front of my car spraying the lane. What do you expect for only $15? I'm grateful for them, but the communication could stand improvement over what I saw tonight. Perhaps I'm just a bit miffed with my setup and looking for someone else to blame? The track officials certainly don't deserve any for how it ran this night.





CRANKWALKED? 7-bolt teardown 1080HD
Now this is a story all about how My bearings got flipped-turned upside down And I'd like to take a minute just sit right there And tell you how I used to mix and burn my gas and my air. In RVA suburbs born and raised On the dragstrip is where I spent most of my days Chillin out, maxin, relaxing all cool, 'n all shooting some BS outside with my tools When a couple of guys who were up to no good Started running races in my neighborhood I heard one little knock and my rods got scared And said "You put it in the garage until you figure out where..." I Begged and pleaded that it not be that way, But it didn't want to start and run another day. I kissed it goodbye, because the motor punched its ticket I got out my camera, said "I might as well kick it." Crankwalk yo this is bad Drinking metal shavings from an oil pan. Is this what the rumor of crankwalk is like? Hmm this won't be alright But wait I heard knocking, grinding and all that Is this the type of failure that should happen to this cool cat? I don't think so, I'll see when I get there I hope they're prepared for this video I share. Well I pulled all the bolts and when I came out There were chunks in my fluids in the pan and they drained out I aint all depressed cause I seen this before. I got my books and my wrench and we'll do it once more. I sprang into action like lightning disassembled I whistled while I worked and my hands never trembled If anything you could say that this bling is rare, and when I saw what broke I stained my underwear. I turned off the air compressor 'bout 7 or 8 And I yelled to crankcase "Yo holmes, smell ya later" I looked at my internals they were finally there To sit on my workbench and stink up the air. Audio track by RojoDelChocolate. Here's the 48,000 mile-old 7-bolt I blew up summer 2011 after over 150 drag passes, a half dozen Dyno sessions, 4 transmissions, 3 clutches and 10 years of hard all-weather use.





How to port and polish a turbo exhaust housing
I'll fill this in later. The "book" I typed in this field before didn't save. Come back later if you want to read more about the theories behind porting and polishing.





"Fix" J-pipe for ebay 20g
HI KIDS!!!!! Here's what I did to make the 20g work with all my aftermarket stuff. All I had to modify was the J-pipe. No aftermarket pipes would work because they wouldn't point towards my lower Intercooler pipe. This car is equipped with a short-route pipe kit with an unusual set of custom pipes. You'll see how to mark a piece to be welded, and you'll need to be resourceful if you don't have a welder that works on what your pipes are made out of. This thing fits perfectly now. This leaves me unable to really blame the turbo for the fit because this J-pipe's always been a bastard. I need a TIG welder BAD! Thanks Ronnie! This was 50¢ holding up a dollar, and I appreciate the skill. ...and THANKS AGAIN RojoDelChocolate!





Boost Leak Testing 202: Hair Spray 1080HD
Why do I know about this? I'm tired of being the one knowing all the weird crap. If everyone knows it, it won't be weird anymore. It will be commonplace. By the time I'm done sealing up all of my own Boost leaks, all of you will also be experts as well. I'm sure most of you would teach me something, too... but you subscribed, so here it comes... something I learned in my travels... Also, thanks Ilya M. I've only heard about it twice in my life. It worked great for the one time I've ever needed it, and I'm a huge fan.





Garage Modification 3
For those of you that read video info... I made YouTube Partnership 2 weeks ago. It's taken almost 3 years an over 4000 hours of work, but I made it! Thank you for your support, time, comments, ratings and generosity! Thank you for helping me cross the half-million view mark and more than 1500 subscribers! The growth my channel has experienced is both flattering and unexpected. I'm just a random guy doing what I [usually] love to do and filming it. I'm grateful to everyone who favorites my videos and also helped your subscribers find me. Those who posted my videos in forums... Just... Thank you! Whether or not what I do helps you build a better car, you're helping me to build a better cars in many different ways, and there's no greater gift you could give to a guy like me. What this video is about? I've run out of space. I like efficiency. I'm saving energy and adding comfort to a room I spend a LOT of time in. The shelves I bought were nearly $100 each, and I figured I could buy enough material to finish an attic in my garage for less than half of that and end up with far more storage. That's what this is. I got a little sidetracked from just finishing the walls, I'll admit, but I'm really happy with the results! I vinyl-wrapped the attic insulation for an additional vapor barrier, to keep the attic insulation up (because it was starting to sag), and for added R-value. It made a HUGE difference! Especially the added ceiling. Now on an overcast day when it's over 90° F outside, I can get the garage down to 65°-66°F with just a window unit. Almost there. I'm using 19/32" OSB particle board for everything because sheet rock is just too delicate for the kind of mechanic I am. It costs the same but is far more durable than drywall. Yes, I eyeballed lots of stuff and nailed it because that's how I roll. I've knocked out the section in the corner behind the compressor, the corner behind the workbench, the back wall, and installed conduit for future upgrades. Where I'm at with the garage right now allows me to now put a car back inside. I've got one wall and a workbench left to finish, but that's going to wait a bit for now. It's going to be a big job that I need to gather things for, and I need to get some other videos up here first for the faithful. I made and posted this just because I want you to know that progress is being made for the sake of the channel, also to improve the scenery because 1080HD isn't kind, and to show why I've been "gone" for so long. This video spans over 40 hours of work because a lot of it happened off-camera gathering materials and doing math. It took eleven 85 minute HDV tapes, 2.7 TB of disk space total just to make a 817 MB flattened movie. RojoDelChocolate once again comes through with a dynamite audio track for the occasion. The disco ball is courtesy of my previous bachelor pad, and desperately needs to be connected to a garage door opener.





Cylinder Head 205 - Degree DOHC Camshafts
This video is all about establishing your valve timing baseline, and adjusting your camshafts to the manufacturer's spec. It's only ONE of several steps that should be performed when you're assembling your engine on an engine stand. Establishing these conditions with accuracy while your engine installed in the car is a near-impossibility, and the reason why... is demonstrated in this video. There are several challenges to overcome when performing these procedures on a 4gxx series Mitsubishi engine, and they're all defeated here. The cylinder head used in this video is a J1 spec '92 Hyundai Elantra small-combustion chamber head which has had several valve jobs and has been resurfaced multiple times by budget engine remanufacturers who didn't care about quality control, as well as performance shops who do. It has had no less than .040" removed from the head gasket surface, the valves are recessed because of all the valve jobs performed, and at some point when it was cut, it wasn't level. Removing material from the deck surface will change the installed camshaft centerline, and that will change your engine's valve timing events even if all other parts remain the same. I would claim this is a multi-part video except that I've got the videos broken up by topic already, and this one is all about setting your cams to the manufacturer's specification. It is not the end of testing that will be performed with these tools. The basics concerning the process and tool fabrication are covered here. Further discussion on this topic concerning the effects of advancing or retarding camshafts from spec, and for checking your valve clearance will be in the videos that follow. I had to end this video after the manufacturer's spec was achieved to make it easier to digest, and because it would have created a video greater than one hour in length despite the break-neck speeds that things happen here on Jafromobile. Where your cams are set determine how the swept volume of the combustion chamber gets used. The information on the manufacturer's spec sheet is their recommendation for baseline settings that will help you get the most out of those camshafts. Whether or not your engine can operate with those specifications without additional hardware or without causing a catastrophic failure will be expanded upon in Cylinder Head 206. The next video should be used as a companion to this video because establishing the manufacturer's baseline is not the end of the assembly or testing process. It's only half the battle. Should you be lucky enough to find your combination of parts allow your camshafts to fit and requires no additional adjustment after assembly, the steps in this video and in Cylinder Head 206 should still be performed if you are doing the assembly yourself. Failure to inspect these variables may lead to a tuning nightmare once the engine is back in the car, hard starts, or worse... bent valves and damaged wrist pins. Making these tools and performing these steps will give you the peace of mind to know with certainty that your engine is operating safely at its peak performance.





Valve Cover Modification and Polishing
Crankcase ventilation in a nutshell: High cylinder pressures are achieved both on the compression and combustion strokes. As gasses are compressed and exploded, the rings do the best they can with extremely close tolerances (and oil) to hold all that pressure in... but some still makes it past the rings. That's called blow-by. Blow-by is why all combustion engines are inefficient by design, and why they have crankcase breather systems. Blow-by contains air, water (humidity), fuel, carbon and nitrogen. You don't really want all that stuff in your oil, as they all contribute to oil viscosity breakdown. A breather system works to extract those gasses from the crankcase so they don't condensate into the oil. It does this by connecting the car's air intake system to the crankcase so that blow-by can be re-burnt and transformed into oxides that the catalytic converter can easily break down. As an engine gets worn, the physical capability of the rings to hold that pressure in is reduced. This results in more blow-by and higher crankcase pressure. High crankcase pressure is bad because it prevents the rings from sealing properly, and can also blow oil seals like valve cover gaskets, front case and rear main seals, etc... as that air tries to escape. This is a fire hazard. Oil burns and it's hard to put out. One of the most common tell-tale signs of high crankcase pressure on a DSM is having to zip-tie your dipstick down. If it's getting blown out, then there's excess pressure pushing it out because it has nowhere to go. Also, on an engine that's holding higher crankcase pressure, that pressure works against your oil pressure, and reduces oil flow to all points in the oil system. The factory DSM crankcase has 2 ventilation systems. Two. One is a PCV system (Positive Crankcase Ventilation), and the other one is just a simple breather. The PCV system is connected to the intake manifold, and the breather is connected to the air intake in front of the turbo (or anywhere on the intake in front of the throttle plate on non-turbo cars). The PCV valve is designed to CLOSE OFF the port between the crankcase and the intake manifold when the engine is under load (Boost). When higher pressure is in the intake than the crankcase, a valve snaps shut preventing you from Boosting your crankcase. When you are at idle/cruise (vacuum), it pops open letting those gasses get vacuumed out of the crankcase. Vacuum. The breather always vents back into the intake pre-turbo or pre-throttle plate. That airway is always open. Neither port on either the PCV or the breather are bigger than 1/4", so as much air as you can fit through a single 1/4" hole when you're under Boost... that's all the blow-by it can extract from the crankcase. That might be fine for an 11 PSI factory car, but when some tweaker wants to flow 30, 40, 50+ pounds of Boost, this is a system which is frequently overlooked and in desperate need of attention. You might as well look at your Boost controller as a blow-by increaser if that makes any sense. You gotta get those gasses out of the crankcase. Crankcase pressure is bad. I'm not going to cover vacuum pumps, venturis or other methods of creating vacuum pressure in the crank case because these advanced techniques are for racing applications with dry-sump oil systems which DSMs do not have from the factory, and few people need. Aside from the rings, only worn valve seals can contribute to high crankcase pressure, and that usually causes increased oil consumption that's visible (oil smoke) on cold starts and as the car rolls into high Boost after long periods of vacuum. Some people have tools that can allow them to change the valve seals without removing the cylinder head (if the rings are known to be good), but that's far more time consuming and less complete of a fix than removing and rebuilding the cylinder head. If the rings and cylinder bores are in bad shape, then it's a waste of money. Someone who's performed compression and leak-down tests has determined which parts are bad already. As far as the rest goes, I bypassed my PCV system entirely. There is no vacuum scavenging of gasses from the crankcase on my car. It eliminates the chance of a PCV valve failing and Boosting my crankcase, and since I have a catch can, excessive blow-by is still being captured through condensation. I installed two 3/8" breather ports which flows more than 8 times the air that the original ones could flow. That should prevent pressure from ever building up. The -8AN fittings are compression fittings that don't require gaskets and are extremely easy to work with. They create an airtight seal to my Greddy catch can which I had modified to accept 2 extra fittings. One is plugged. The other has a 5/8" line to the turbine intake to extract gasses back to the engine like it was originally designed to do.





fix GOT BOOST o2 dump housing
It's a pipe! It's a cheap upgrade. It's going to be awesome but it's not perfect. There, I fixed it. In this video I install a GOT Boost external dump o2 housing onto a turbo I'm fiddling with. The product is sold as "ported" and it is indeed in comparison to the factory part... but there are a variety of Exhaust housings this could be port-matched to, so I'm glad it didn't arrive with this done for some other turbo. It can benefit from a little tweaking. The technique I'm using here is gasket matching. Using the gasket as a guide, cut the ports so that both flange surfaces match. Radius your steps or remove them if there's enough material to play with. Polish off the rough spots. Mine wasn't flat and I'm glad. Because I got to show you how to fix it at 600x and save you hours of footage of me filing it flat. Stroke hand files in ONLY ONE DIRECTION. They're not made to use like hacksaws. It destroys them. At the speed the video plays, you can't really pick that out of it but I was very careful to preserve my file. I've had it for 15 years.





Hyundai Assembly 5 - Fighting The Valve Clearance
In previous videos I showed the 2 factors that really need to be scrutinized. Valve clearance and how you degree your camshafts. Of course we got sidetracked with plenty of other tips and tricks but I wanted to upload this video to illustrate that the process really isn't as easy as the animations, demonstrations and explanations make it look. The reasoning is sound, but the work to execute it can be very tedious. Setting up the valvetrain on this engine was very tedious. I say "was" because following this video, we can put that whole topic to bed. This is what it took. Not many people have the patience to deal with this, and I wanted to showcase here for those who are at the peak of their frustration with their builds. This kind of stuff can happen to anyone. Let my pain and suffering help you not feel so all alone. My apologies for the lack of new groundbreaking technical info. It's not a complicated task to install ARP head studs, and that was my plot twist. There are a couple of hurdles you may encounter depending on the production year of your engine, but they're well illustrated in this video. I'm not sure if their installation warrants a video all unto itself, but if you feel it does, speak up because I have 3 more engines to build. I can still do it. I just wanted to demonstrate that progress is being made on this, and despite the long breaks between uploads, a LOT is going on behind the scenes. This was 20 hours of repetitive work and I hope it's at least mildly entertaining. For me, this was the most boring video I've ever edited here because I had to re-live the same steps so many times, over and over again. I could very easily have inserted an hour of it in the wrong place and nobody would ever have known because it all looks the same. The text overlays are there only so you can be aware of what's different. A voiceover would have been pointless because the techniques illustrated are discussed ad-nauseum in the Cylinder Head 205 and 206 videos. The valve cover gasket installation process was covered in "Valve Cover Modification and Polishing", and the discussion about compression ratios is explained in "Calculate Your Compression Ratio". If you like the job the parts washer did, check out my DIY parts washer video. ;) Cylinder Head 205 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbWWCKPuZG4 Cylinder Head 206 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4s2X3VUwADA Valve Cover Modification and Polishing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NiIi9EljLSk Calculate Your Compression Ratio https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWze92nt9OU





Honda ebay review
This is a review about ebay and their products, I ran a little about how nobody wants to try anything but yet they want to knock it.. And for all the haters there is something special at the end for you ;)





DIY Fuel Injector Cleaning & Repair
This is the end result of a few hours of work and $60 because I didn't have a 1/4" NPT tap in any of my kits. I could have done this for less-than $40. The BG products were donated to the cause. Tech info: The REASON you want to use 20 PSI is precisely because of how peak-hold type injectors work. The injector signal sends a 4v spike to open a peak-hold type injector quickly, then maintains its open condition with only 1 volt. Really, it's a current thing and there's a longer explanation, but that's it in a nutshell. When you put the injector in its operating pressure, it takes more than a AA battery to open it, but you don't want to sustain that much current with a momentary switch and your expensive injectors. This isn't in the video because this warning wouldn't be as clear. Unless you can simulate the injector pulse precisely, don't try it. 1.5v is enough to open it below its operating pressure. If you open it and THEN apply pressure, you can flow as much pressure as you can throw at it. I don't discourage anyone from getting their injectors professionally cleaned and balanced, but in my case, I didn't feel that was necessary. In my first video, I thanked the seller for these injectors and happy to know I got a great deal on high quality parts. My gratitude is even greater because I had problems with them. It gave me an opportunity to help others troubleshoot these kinds of problems when purchasing used parts. A different idiot might have blamed the seller for peddling crap, demanding their money back... but that would only be because they didn't even know what they were looking at. This particular idiot knows what high quality parts RC injectors are and how to clean 'em. $250 + $60 still means I saved about $150 on a brand new set. We all benefit because I bought these and I'm grateful! Let the good times roll.





Boost Leak Testing 201: Using the tool.
This is the second part of the Boost leak testing series. In this video, several examples of possible leaks you might find are exhibited, as well as suggested fixes. Hopefully this video helps turbo cars around the world to be healthier and more powerful.





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