Drag Racing 1/4 Mile times 0-60 Dyno Fast Cars Muscle Cars

Installing an eBay 20g

I'm reviewing an ebay 20g TD05 internally-gated turbocharger. You've seen me open it, assess it, and port it. Now I'm going to install it and see how it fits on my car. Its dimensions are close enough to a Mitsubishi turbo that it fits well, but it didn't play nice with my aftermarket stuff as the video illustrates. You'll see what I mean... The wastegate actuator nipple aims straight toward the compressor housing, and I don't like it. I fixed it with a pair of pliers and an allen wrench at 5:55 in a way that's far less likely to break it. The flanges and bolt centers lined up fine and without any issues, though others have claimed to have had them with this turbo. The compressor cover is an obvious giveaway regarding identifying this turbo. It does not wear the cast-in designation TD05H that the Mitsubishi turbos do, but for $228, what do you expect? If you chose to go this route, just manage your expectations. Be aware that it might not bolt up perfectly to your particular car, and be willing to fix what isn't perfect.


 


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First ebay 20g drag passes
I made 2 passes. On the first one, nearly everything that could go wrong did. But I'm a persistent bastard. I fixed it all, found everybody and then made this run. It wasn't until after I got home that I realized I had no in-car video footage of the first run when I broke despite having set it up... I kicked the alternator belt off no-lift-to-shifting into 4th gear around 800 feet and coasted to a 13.3 at 82mph against a 10 second Mustang. Overheating with no power steering I limped it back and put the belt back on, only burning myself 9 times, and then got back out and made this run. The guys in front of us broke, too. I guess it was contagious?

This run is on 93 octane pump gas.

I shouldn't have been in such a hurry. It left me a little unprepared. You learn things about other things while doing things--is the best I can explain it. It didn't knock at all, so clearly the new injectors are working fine... but I didn't take time to burp the coolant system, so it ran hot. My alternator belt was loose, and it bailed on me. I was focusing on explaining the video (I deleted that scene from frustration) rather than putting the car back together, and failed to plug in a very important sensor. I would have caught it, but didn't get a chance to look at the logs until I got home. I have to operate so many pieces of equipment in addition to actually driving that it's very distracting.

The guy in my second race had a beautiful 1967 Dodge Dart, and he was a very good sport! It was a great race where adrenaline is involved, and I was focused but wary of whether or not the alternator belt would stay on. I really appreciate the guys that keep old muscle alive. That car's almost 50 years old. That's making history right there... He cut a great 60 foot after they cleaned up the track, but I wish that car didn't break in his lane prior to his pass if it was a problem for his run.

I tried to leave nothing out and keep it short & sweet. I was lucky to have a track-side cameraman for the second race. Thanks Taylor! Having that sensor plugged in would have left me much more confident in the log data and offer a much better assessment of this turbo, but it is what it is. Here it is...





Hyundai Elantra 4g63 Shortblock Assembly
HOLD ON TIGHT! HERE WE GO! We begin the blueprint and assembly on my 1992 Hyundai Elantra's bastardized 4g63. The parts used in this are from a mash of different brands and models outside of the typical 2.0L 4g63, but the specs and standards I am following for its assembly are for the 2.0L DOHC. If you want to follow along in your service manual to verify what I've done here in this video, the processes we cover here detail pages 11C-95 through 11C-105 of the 1g Overhaul manual. I would prefer you not rip them from the binding and throw them away, relying only on this video for instruction... but rather use this video as a motivational guide, and as a demonstration of the techniques involved in those sections. You gotta do the cooking by the book. I never had any intention of making instructional videos on this particular car, but after it blew up I slowly realized it's actually a better case study for how a 4g63 ticks than anything else in my driveway. There are several reasons for this. One being that it's a mix of parts that shouldn't be bolted together, and the other is that many of you watching my videos aren't trying to build a 600hp engine out of aftermarket parts. You're trying to put back together what used to be your daily driver. This car covers those bases. Don't think for a second I won't go through this same trouble and level of detail for the GSX. I will. When I do, having this information in this video will give you a better understanding on how and why I do things the way I do when I get there. This was the shortest I could condense this video. I've never uploaded a video this long, and I hope I never have to do it again. It took a month to create on cutting-edge equipment, 16 hours to export, and 9 hours for YouTube to process. My script for the voiceover is 6 times longer than the whole script for the movie Pootie Tang. 6 times. Longer. Than a Hollywood movie.





Turbo Elantra Bearing Failure Diagnosis
I had time to look at this thing up close. Go through the oil system, and check out all the bearings. Looks like another good study for my oil system series because it's the opposite problem that my GSX experienced. High oil pressure can be remedied a number of ways, but left unchecked can actually take a toll on your bearings. The way your engine bearings work, the parts they suspend are supported only by an oil film layer, and flow needs to be right in order for it to work as an actual bearing. If the oil supply is insufficient, then it loses the ability to suspend the part causing it to crash into the bearing surface. If oil flow is too great, friction is increased, the flow becomes turbulent, and the oil film doesn't form properly. High oil pressure can float and spin rod bearings, and that's worst-case scenario. I had several un-favorable conditions going on inside this engine and that makes it a little bit difficult to link what my engine experienced to any one singular thing. I think it's easier to look at it like some sort of perfect storm. From sub-standard parts for how the engine components would be used, to oil pressure, to part fatigue, to part history to abuse... this thing's got a little bit of everything working against it and that's why it's such a hilarious car. It was given to me with one condition. "See what this thing will do, and see how long it goes before it breaks." My take on it is, the parts are still less than ideal, and they've still got life left in them. It's worth fixing. These parts are worthless as a race motor, and normally I'd have junked 'em, but it's the Hyundai.





Cylinder Head 204 - Porting & Polishing
This is a first-generation 1992 1.6L Hyundai Elantra small-combustion-chamber head. Thats what it is. It's a J1 Elantra cylinder head. Good luck finding another one like it. (read more)... In Cylinder Head 106 I talked about the mainstream porting theories as they are discussed. We looked at a cylinder head that I have thousands of dollars of professional work performed on, and a bone-stock second-generation head that I didn't port. In this video I just might do something you haven't seen done before. For some, that may be uncomfortable. The port and polish job I perform here is what I think will work best for my current build. This is not an extreme killer port job. What will be different here is where port textures are concerned, I will be following the advice of a reputable source that will remain un-named. You're free to port yours differently than I do in this video, and I give you that out, around the 20 minute marker. The Hyundai is far from being an ultimate-performance build. It's a $400 box of scraps with nothing but time invested. It's perfect for this video. My finished product WILL be an improvement over what I had. I don't yet have access to a flow bench. I still have an achievement to un-lock. As far as you should be concerned with the techniques I employ... without flow numbers there is no evidence of what this will do, but we will gather lots of info from dynp sessions and drag strip time slips. If I could test it on a flow bench, I would. There are MANY, and when I say many, I mean thousands of flame war mongering pirates floating around on rough seas with a hair trigger cannon finger itching to fire if you port a head any differently than what the herd mentality says to do while porting a cylinder head. I cover the herd mentality because it has merit. It's been tested. Tried and true. But I don't follow it to the letter of the law. I'm definitely not here to de-bunk it. I would port a cylinder head differently for each build based on how that engine was used. There's an extremely valid reason why relating to air speed. It's not the texture of a port that maximizes the effect of fuel atomization, but the velocity of the air running through an x or y sized valve. The driving factor in this is the piston speed. I'm not going to give you the technical information, but will refer you to information about the Lovell factor. There's a better description of this in the links below, and even a calculator to help you find your engine's sweet spot. Why the Lovell factor is important: https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/3346/the-effect-of-valve-size Lovell gas factor calculator: http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/lovellgascalc.html Only people who have flow testing equipment know for sure what really works and have the capability to produce a perfectly-matched port job for the ultimate performance build. Those guys know the definition of ultimate, and THEY are floating below the water Aegis-class submarines ready to blow your comment up if you don't know what you're talking about. They don't care if you're an armchair mechanic or a herd of pirates. I will say, they're zoomed in pretty close on me right now, and I'm expecting to take a few hits. My work will be tested based on Dyno and drag strip performance, and the results will be posted here. Fortunately, those kinds of videos are a WHOLE LOT EASIER TO MAKE!!!





Porting an eBay 20g turbocharger
The price of this turbo will make it a popular purchase, so I figured I'd air out some tech about ways to improve it. This thing is not for everybody. I wouldn't feel comfortable bolting it on my car the way it comes out of the box. I could complain about its flaws except that so far absolutely none of them have been a deal-breaker for me. To me it's like an empty canvas. I promise to eat those words if it happens, and share my poop. Usually I can easily correct these flaws myself and so can you. BUT! If this thing turns out to perform well with what I do to it... It could easily be a cheap, quick ticket to an 11-second car. Something you could do with a free running 1g, a hacksaw, and about $500 worth of fuel upgrades. Yeah, that would be ridiculous, and I'm bolting it onto a well-modified car... But that being possible speaks volumes for what a DSM can really do. This is no big deal to me. I'd rather guinea pig my car for you in HD so you guys can decide whether or not you'd spend your money on this. Really it's an experiment because this isn't my daily-driver, and it contributes to building a better Colt. Tools I used involve: Scratch awl Milwaukee model ???? 1/4" straight-shaft electric DIY grinder Cone and ball-shaped double-cut burs 180 grit high-speed flap wheel Dremel with a flex-shaft and a tiny 320-grit flap wheel a zip tie 10mm combination wrench tiny flat-blade screwdriver (00) for the e-clip on the wastegate compressed air





More ebay 20g drag passes
Trolled by mother nature. I thought plugging in my o2 sensor might make a difference. Scarily that's not how things worked out. My fuel trims are all jacked up with or without it. Airflow counts are down. I have more to do to this thing, but in an effort to keep things real, I'm uploading what happened and what I found in the logs. The PRIMARY reason for racing is development of both self and your equipment. If your goal is to have an awesome street car, you can't fully-achieve that goal without rigorous testing where numbers and facts are clearly evident. You JUST CAN'T do that on the STREET. There are no numbers on the street, no measurement of a baseline nor any improvements you might make. There's no measurement of a drivers' skill outside of, "did you win or didn't you?" I didn't come to the track with the expectation of MY driving needing to be improved. I was simply getting numbers, so I wasn't a tree-nazi like I was in the Friday Night No-Lift-To-Shift video. There was more incentive for me to just not red-light and see what she'll do. This evening I didn't feel like the track crew were on their A-game. Sometimes they held staged cars for an inordinately long period of time... which once I'm staged, I'm on the rev limiter, and once they left me there awaiting the tree for over 20 seconds, heating my car up and leaving me disadvantaged out of the hole. Other times they treated the starting lanes, dried off my opponent's side but not mine, not giving instruction to hold or wait. In fact, one guy was signaling me forward while another crew member was standing in front of my car spraying the lane. What do you expect for only $15? I'm grateful for them, but the communication could stand improvement over what I saw tonight. Perhaps I'm just a bit miffed with my setup and looking for someone else to blame? The track officials certainly don't deserve any for how it ran this night.





Honda ebay review
This is a review about ebay and their products, I ran a little about how nobody wants to try anything but yet they want to knock it.. And for all the haters there is something special at the end for you ;)





CRANKWALKED? 7-bolt teardown 1080HD
Now this is a story all about how My bearings got flipped-turned upside down And I'd like to take a minute just sit right there And tell you how I used to mix and burn my gas and my air. In RVA suburbs born and raised On the dragstrip is where I spent most of my days Chillin out, maxin, relaxing all cool, 'n all shooting some BS outside with my tools When a couple of guys who were up to no good Started running races in my neighborhood I heard one little knock and my rods got scared And said "You put it in the garage until you figure out where..." I Begged and pleaded that it not be that way, But it didn't want to start and run another day. I kissed it goodbye, because the motor punched its ticket I got out my camera, said "I might as well kick it." Crankwalk yo this is bad Drinking metal shavings from an oil pan. Is this what the rumor of crankwalk is like? Hmm this won't be alright But wait I heard knocking, grinding and all that Is this the type of failure that should happen to this cool cat? I don't think so, I'll see when I get there I hope they're prepared for this video I share. Well I pulled all the bolts and when I came out There were chunks in my fluids in the pan and they drained out I aint all depressed cause I seen this before. I got my books and my wrench and we'll do it once more. I sprang into action like lightning disassembled I whistled while I worked and my hands never trembled If anything you could say that this bling is rare, and when I saw what broke I stained my underwear. I turned off the air compressor 'bout 7 or 8 And I yelled to crankcase "Yo holmes, smell ya later" I looked at my internals they were finally there To sit on my workbench and stink up the air. Audio track by RojoDelChocolate. Here's the 48,000 mile-old 7-bolt I blew up summer 2011 after over 150 drag passes, a half dozen Dyno sessions, 4 transmissions, 3 clutches and 10 years of hard all-weather use.





GT35 Turbo Ebay
This is just a quick video to see if anyone out there has any info on this turbo.... visit KustomHobbies.com





How to Turbo - Part 1
After buying a Euro car last episode, Marty discovers he has not yet found his perfect vehicle... In this extended episode, we reveal what he got, and show how to make it faster. Wanna show the world that you fix your own shizzle? MCM stickers, ti shirts and other mad shizuoika available here: http://www.mightycarmods.com/collections/all Official Site: http://www.mightycarmods.com Forum: http://forums.mightycarmods.com Music from the episode is available here: http://www.mightycarmods.com/collections/music (Forced Induction by MOOG was featured in this episode) Also something to note around Mighty Car Mods: we are normal guys and are not trained mechanics. We like to make interesting car mods and show you how we've gone about it, but we can't promise that anything we show you will work for your particular car, or that you won't harm yourself, someone else, your car or your warranty doing it. Please be safe, be responsible and unless you know what you're doing, do not fool around with very serious machinery just because you've seen us make it look so easy. Talk to a qualified mechanic if you are in any doubt.





Ebay turbo 1,000 mile update
EMUSA turbo 1,000 miles .064" restrictor with -3AN feed line





4g63 Block Cleanup & Oil System Mods
With no data other than another person's testimony and from observing the condition of failed rod bearings I was able to determine this engine suffered problems from high oil pressure. There are 3 modifications that wanted to perform to its oil system, and 2 parts I chose to replace. All of the videos that go into greater detail about these modifications and parts are linked from this video. Though I've covered these topics, this is a video of the work being done to the Hyundai because it's part of its mod list. Also in the process I've stripped and removed all gaskets in preparation for parts washing. All of these tasks can be completed without an air compressor by taking your time with a razor blade or using electric grinding tools. If you're doing this kind of work, I strongly suggest for time's sake that you use an air compressor. If you have access to an air compressor and any of these [cheap] tools, then you can do these kinds of modifications for less than $20. NAPA sells everything but the spudger (below) individually so there's no need to buy these consumable supplies in bulk. 3m bristle discs: http://lmgtfy.com/?q=3m+roloc+bristle+disc I used this cleaning up the oil pan. It's a spudger. An electronics tool. http://lmgtfy.com/?q=spudger I also used 3m Scotch Brite wheels to clean the oil pan's gasket surface. http://lmgtfy.com/?q=roloc+3m+scotch+brite+wheel+mmm7486





How to Rebuild a Turbo - Part 1 of 2
Rebuilding a td05h 16g turbo. This process can be applied to many journal bearing turbochargers. :) It definitely comes in handy to know how to do this when you are in this type of hobby. 4/25/12: Small explanation on the balancing of the rotating assembly since I get so many comments regarding it. This particular turbocharger, td05h, has its rotating assembly components balanced separately. This means each individual part (compressor wheel, turbine wheel/shaft) gets balanced separately. This allows for easy interchangeability of parts in case they need replacing. This is why I am able to install a td05 20g wheel on this turbo without having to balance the entire rotating assembly. THIS IS NOT THE CASE FOR ALL turboS OUT THERE. You need to research whether your specific turbo (if it's not td05h) was balanced as an assembly or "component balanced" like I explained above. I hope this information helps. Good luck in your projects. Stay Boostin' keywords: turbocharger dsm eclipse talon awd gsx tsi fwd gst mitsubishi evo evolution lancer 14b 20g td06 td06h td05 install installation upgrade race vs Boost supra wrx sti toyota subaru Dyno laser rs rst 13g hx35 hx40 holset 18g 25g sbr t25 stock replace rebuilding big large nissan 240sx t28





Boost Leak Testing 202: Hair Spray 1080HD
Why do I know about this? I'm tired of being the one knowing all the weird crap. If everyone knows it, it won't be weird anymore. It will be commonplace. By the time I'm done sealing up all of my own Boost leaks, all of you will also be experts as well. I'm sure most of you would teach me something, too... but you subscribed, so here it comes... something I learned in my travels... Also, thanks Ilya M. I've only heard about it twice in my life. It worked great for the one time I've ever needed it, and I'm a huge fan.





"Fix" J-pipe for ebay 20g
HI KIDS!!!!! Here's what I did to make the 20g work with all my aftermarket stuff. All I had to modify was the J-pipe. No aftermarket pipes would work because they wouldn't point towards my lower Intercooler pipe. This car is equipped with a short-route pipe kit with an unusual set of custom pipes. You'll see how to mark a piece to be welded, and you'll need to be resourceful if you don't have a welder that works on what your pipes are made out of. This thing fits perfectly now. This leaves me unable to really blame the turbo for the fit because this J-pipe's always been a bastard. I need a TIG welder BAD! Thanks Ronnie! This was 50¢ holding up a dollar, and I appreciate the skill. ...and THANKS AGAIN RojoDelChocolate!





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