Full Electric Car Home Conversion - 1988 Pontiac Fiero Part 1

The process of converting my Pontiac Fiero to 144 volt electric car. Full video documentation of the process along with a few test drives. It runs on 12, 12 volt Trojan deep cycle lead acid batteries. Powered by a 9.1 in. dia. Advanced DC motor with a 500 amp Curtis controller. Part 2 and 3 will be coming soon. GO ELECTRIC!

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EV Capri ep4 - Kearon's electric car conversion
Yessir - the car now has a real, bona-fide, 100% genuine electric motor in it! We also talk about the intricacies of some of the less-sexy parts of an Electric Vehicle - the brake vacuum pump, the ceramic heater, the battery pack cutoff switch and the motor adaptor plate.





Chevy S10 Electric motor running on 12V
Advanced DC 9" motor in Chevy S10, running test on one 12V battery. Insurance company says they'll insure the truck as any other car would be! The final price of the trucks conversion required a line of credit on the house mortgage, went with $9000 worth of lithium batteries. Way better than the lead acid ones at a third of the weight, and last alot longer, four years so far (as of Apr 2013)





Full Electric Car Home Conversion - 1988 Pontiac Fiero Part 3
The process of converting my Pontiac Fiero to 144 volt electric car. Full video documentation of the process along with a few test drives. It runs on 12, 12 volt Trojan deep cycle lead acid batteries. Powered by a 9.1 in. dia. Advanced DC motor with a 500 amp Curtis controller. About $6,000 for EV components not including: car, tools, steel brackets for battery box, 12V wiring supplies, new break pads. Tested top speed: 70 mph. Though this was limited by the road. Preliminary range test: 30 miles without fully conditioned batteries. GO ELECTRIC!





Electric Starion EV - Electric Car Conversion - Part 3
Welcome to the third installment. It's taken a bit of preparation time, which is essential rather than diving in to find something we've done is not quite right - both Nathan and I have been guilty in the past of making stuff only to discover a better way of doing it. But parts availability has been the biggest issue; delivery time has been long delayed for many reasons too complicated to discuss here. In this video we re-assess engine bay mounting; most of the battery racks are welded up now and the battery management has arrived (except the master unit, d'oh!). We discuss battery management, the most efficient use of space in the engine bay, as well as the AC motor we received that will drive the air-con/power steering. (btw, the AC motor and BMS come from www.bev.com.au where they are custom-made). Also an older previously unused segment stripped in about removing weight, as this is crucial in gaining mileage. Oh, and a mention of power cabling which we will try to get through some of the sub-frame rather than running under the vehicle or lumping under the carpet (as the power cable sits inside a plastic flex conduit roughly an inch diameter), so long as it's legal which we'll check with someone who knows (guessing it's something like 600mm distance between u-clamp affixing). The Zivan will sit in trunk/hatch area to the left near the charging 'fuel' port; not sure about tire placement yet, but it looks like we'll keep our back seat which is good thing (and did you know that there is an under-seat sub-frame area roughly two inches high? Hmmm... possibilities....). As for the battery tank at rear, we're looking at ducting hot air from it using PC fans and 'Exhaust' steel piping. It'd be nice to get them through the side vent follies on the pillars, but this would mean a lot of work (they'd probably be part-exposed in the interior, angled down rather like roll-cage bars). Overall I would have loved to have progressed a bit more than we have but there have been circumstances beyond our control and parts supplies have been an issue all the way along - which in a sense is a good thing so we don't rush too-obvious solutions that would otherwise cost in time/energy to undo (in a circumlocutory sort-of way ;-) ). I'd like to thank Christina for her camera work during the making of these videos, shot on a two-year old Nokia N93 still going strong, as well as Linda for filming the air-con motor, without them I'd be stuffed for making videos about this car.




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