cafe racer yamaha


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1982 YAMAHA xj550 CAFE RACER
Me and my dad built this 82 Yamaha Maxim xj550 that we bought. We did a bunch of custom work here in our two car garage. The list of things done to the bike is quite long so I'm not gonna get in too much detail but if you have a question about the bike let me know and I'll try to get to you and answer it. Enjoy and thank you much for watching Jorge jr Music by: mi6 Song: Stupid Little Things





Yamaha Xj 650 1982 cafe racer
A serie of pictures and video from my building process. The colores is an rip off from one i found on the internet.. ;)





Cafe racer xj650
Restored xj650





1982 Yamaha XJ550 Cafe Racer
1982 Yamaha XJ550 Cafe Racer Engine sound so strong and good design. made in Vietnam Café Racers old yamaha finish testing sound , light etc What is a cafe racer style motorcycle? The café racer is a light and lightly powered motorcycle that has been modified for speed and handling rather than comfort. The bodywork and control layout of a café racer typically mimicked the style of a contemporary Grand Prix roadracer, featuring an elongated fuel tank, often with dents to allow the rider's knees to grip the tank, low slung racing handlebars, and a single-person, elongated, humped seat. One signature trait were low, narrow handlebars that allowed the rider to "tuck in" — a posture with reduced wind resistance and better control. These handlebars, known as "clip-ons" (two-piece bars that bolt directly to each fork tube), "clubmans" or "ace bars" (one piece bars that attach to the standard mounting location but drop down and forward). The ergonomics resulting from low bars and the rearward seat often required "rearsets", or rear-set footrests and foot controls, again typical of racing motorcycles of the era. Distinctive half or full race-style fairings were sometimes mounted to the forks or frame Café racer styling evolved throughout the time of their popularity. By the mid-1970s, Japanese bikes had overtaken British bikes in the marketplace, and the look of real Grand Prix racing bikes had changed. The hand-made, frequently unpainted aluminium racing fuel tanks of the 1960s had evolved into square, narrow, fibreglass tanks. Increasingly, three-cylinder Kawasakis and four-cylinder Hondas were the basis for café racer conversions. By 1977, a number of manufacturers had taken notice of the café racer boom and were producing factory café racers, most notably the Harley-Davidson XLCR Classic café racer style has made a comeback recently, thanks largely to the increased interest in vintage motorcycles in general. Baby boomers were responsible for a surge in motorcycle sales in the late 1960s and 1970s. Modern cafe racer conversions generally focus on the aesthetic aspect of the motorcycle rather than pure performance. They are generally based on small capacity air-cooled single or twin cylinder Japanese bikes, with the Yamaha SR400 being the most popular model due to it's classic styling reminiscent of 1970s motorcycles




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