Mercedes-Benz Experimental Safety Vehicle 2009 History

Mercedes-Benz Experimental Safety Vehicle 2009 History

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Mercedes-Benz TecDay, Real Life Safety - Trailer
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Mercedes-Benz ESF Concept
The ESF 2009, based on the Mercedes S 400 HYBRID, is the first Experimental Safety Vehicle to be built by Mercedes-Benz since 1974. Among the highlights of the ESV was the Mercedes-Benz unveiling of the ESF 2009 an experimental safety vehicle with trailblazing innovations including: inflatable metallic sections to afford more stability to structural components within fractions of a second, and a Braking Bag housed within the vehicle floor and more.





Mercedes-Benz World History Timeline promotional video
Mercedes-Benz World at Brooklands, UK History Timeline promotional video.





Mercedes W124 Kombi T-Modell TE History
The Mercedes-Benz E-Class is a range of executive cars manufactured by Mercedes-Benz in various engine and body configurations produced since 1993. Prior to 1993, Mercedes-Benz offered the same category of car under a non-unified naming structure. The E initially stood for Einspritzmotor (German for fuel injection engine); a new feature in volume production vehicles at the time that the E-Class first appeared, with the E as a suffix to the engine nomenclature (e.g. 230E) in the 1960s. It was not until the launch of the facelifted W124 in 1993 that the E was used as a prefix (i.e., E 200) and the model referred to officially as the E-Class (or E-Klasse). At this time all Mercedes cars used fuel injection and the company felt it was no longer necessary to add this as a distinguishing feature. Due to the E-Class's size and durability, the cars also frequently serve as taxis in European and Asian countries. Mercedes-Benz also offers special-purpose vehicles (e.g., police or ambulance modifications) from the factory. W120 (1953–1962) The first modern midsize Mercedes was the W120 'Ponton' 180 of 1953. Sharing its engineering with the R121 190 SL of 1955, the Ponton was a stylish sedan with an four-cylinder engine. A larger-engined W121 190 appeared in 1958. W110 (1961–1968) Mercedes added tailfins to both the big S-Class and the new W110 'Fintail' 190 of 1962. In the 1965 230 model a Straight-6 engine appeared for the first time, and the four cylinder engine grew in displacement. W114, W115 (1968–1976) The midsize Mercedes was redesigned in 1968 as the W114/W115 'Stroke-8'. This time, the 6-cylinder models (The W114s) were most prevalent, with the W115 line making up the bottom of the company's offerings with four – and five-cylinder power. Diesel engines joined the line-up, as did a coupé body. W123 (1976–1986) The popular W123 quickly became a best-seller on its launch in 1976. Especially in diesel powered 200D and 240D (later also the five-cylinder 300D) guises, the cars enhanced the company's reputation for product quality. Over 2.6 million were produced until the end of production in 1986. Saloon/Sedan, Coupé and Estate body configurations were offered. W124 (1984–1993) The W124 was released in 1984 and introduces several new standards for a mid-size Mercedes, as well as the third car to inherit the company's new design theme since the late 1970s; the first two being the flagship W126 and the compact W201. When the series received a facelift in 1993, the naming structure was rationalised with new letter-first nomenclature (as with other models), and officially adapted the nameplate "E-Class". Similar to its predecessors, the W124 also offered a coupé and estate body styles. A new convertible (internally A124), were also available, making it the first mid-size Mercedes convertible. First generation (W124; 1993–1995) The "E-Class" name first appeared in with the face-lifted W124 in 1993 for the model year 1994 (the W124 was introduced in 1984 but continued with the older naming convention until 1993, when all Mercedes-Benz models switched to a new system, e.g. E 320 instead of 300 E). The diesel versions continued to be the fuel economy option over the four and six-cylinder gasoline engines, and the gasoline V8 engines (available after 1992) increased gasoline power outputs further. Four-cylinder gasoline models were not marketed in the United States. The V8 powered sedans/saloons were named 400 E/500 E from 1992–1993, and E 420/E 500 after 1993. For the diesel models the name change was less elegant, with the 250 D becoming the E 250 Diesel for example. Sedan (W124), Coupé (C124) Convertible (A124) and Estate (S124) body configurations were offered. From 1991 to early 1995 Mercedes offered a limited production sport version of the W124 sedan, created and assembled with help from Porsche. This was called the 500 E (E 500 after 1993). Second generation (W210; 1995–2002) Third generation (W211; 2002–2009) Fourth generation (W212; 2009–present) Music: http://www.bensound.com




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