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Jamie's Boosted Hyundai Elantra (Oct '11)

This is an old video that I've decided to post practically un-edited. A few parts were skipped regarding off-topic babble in order to keep it under 10 minutes. You've seen this car in another video. There really is no way to determine how many different cars contributed to this build. Every last part on it (except the one featured in this video) was previously used on another vehicle. Absolutely nothing came new in a box. The owner put enough 4g63's together in a lifetime to have extra gaskets and seals laying around to exclusively use junkyard parts to build a whole car. In the last video, you saw me contribute all the turbo parts to this build. Used 150,000 mile old stock DSM turbo parts including a worked 14b. I'm happy to show it to you all put together. Check the other video of this car if you want more details on the engine build. None of the internals have changed.


 


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Hyundai Assembly 5 - Fighting The Valve Clearance
In previous videos I showed the 2 factors that really need to be scrutinized. Valve clearance and how you degree your camshafts. Of course we got sidetracked with plenty of other tips and tricks but I wanted to upload this video to illustrate that the process really isn't as easy as the animations, demonstrations and explanations make it look. The reasoning is sound, but the work to execute it can be very tedious. Setting up the valvetrain on this engine was very tedious. I say "was" because following this video, we can put that whole topic to bed. This is what it took. Not many people have the patience to deal with this, and I wanted to showcase here for those who are at the peak of their frustration with their builds. This kind of stuff can happen to anyone. Let my pain and suffering help you not feel so all alone. My apologies for the lack of new groundbreaking technical info. It's not a complicated task to install ARP head studs, and that was my plot twist. There are a couple of hurdles you may encounter depending on the production year of your engine, but they're well illustrated in this video. I'm not sure if their installation warrants a video all unto itself, but if you feel it does, speak up because I have 3 more engines to build. I can still do it. I just wanted to demonstrate that progress is being made on this, and despite the long breaks between uploads, a LOT is going on behind the scenes. This was 20 hours of repetitive work and I hope it's at least mildly entertaining. For me, this was the most boring video I've ever edited here because I had to re-live the same steps so many times, over and over again. I could very easily have inserted an hour of it in the wrong place and nobody would ever have known because it all looks the same. The text overlays are there only so you can be aware of what's different. A voiceover would have been pointless because the techniques illustrated are discussed ad-nauseum in the Cylinder Head 205 and 206 videos. The valve cover gasket installation process was covered in "Valve Cover Modification and Polishing", and the discussion about compression ratios is explained in "Calculate Your Compression Ratio". If you like the job the parts washer did, check out my DIY parts washer video. ;) Cylinder Head 205 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbWWCKPuZG4 Cylinder Head 206 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4s2X3VUwADA Valve Cover Modification and Polishing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NiIi9EljLSk Calculate Your Compression Ratio https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWze92nt9OU





Jafro's Hyundai Elantra Surprise
There are some things you can't put a price on. I'm not just talking about the Hyundai. I'm talking about Jamie. I have the best friends in the world. Look what Jamie just did for all of your entertainment. He literally donated it to me to play with on this channel. This isn't just for me. Think about it. It's the only FWD DSM in my driveway, and the only one I'm likely to have. With this combination of parts, I could not have a greater challenge making this car stick. Because right now it doesn't at all. Torque steer ends at about 5700 RPMs in third gear. Boost is instantaneous. This car could never make good use of any larger of a turbo. I'm convinced with the right combo of tricks to gain timing and tweaks to make it stick, and that it will run deep into the 12's just like it is. This car is a kick in the pants to drive. A rolling burnout. Be careful with that downshift.





DIY Parts Washer
IF you have access to compressed air, you can clean, degrease and restore the finish on automotive parts (and anything else really, not just DSMs) using the simple, inexpensive tools and supplies I demonstrate in this video. AUDIO TRACK BY: ROJODELCHOCOLATE* Some things don't fit in a parts washer. Sometimes you can't remove them from a vehicle. Sometimes you need to bring your parts washer to your project instead of the other way around. This INEXPENSIVE method for parts cleaning solves all of those problems. Caked-on grease, grime, carbon and oil are no match against this simple solution. For between $6 and $30 you can purchase a siphon-feed blow gun... spray gun... whatever you want to call it. NAPA sells an American made unit that's more expensive (like I used here) that occasionally suffer from quality control issues, and Harbor Freight sells one for $6 that I have no experience with. The tool is so simple that I can't see why it would work any differently. Mineral spirits (coal oil) is a highly-refined petroleum-based, low-odor, low-volatility solvent that can be used for many purposes from thinning paint to serving as thread cutting oil. Automotive professionals found that it actually lifts oil out of metal. This makes it an ideal choice for engine parts cleaning. Because most fluids in your car are petroleum-based, it's the ideal thinner to cut through the grease and wash away the funk. It has a much higher flash point than other solvents that are effective at cleaning up grease and oil. It's very similar to Kerosene. No special breathing aparatus is required. Gloves and googles are recommended. Because of its rapid evaporation, only minor preparations need to be made to your workspace to deal with the run-off. Vaporized mineral spirits evaporate completely just a few feet away from the blow gun, and drippings evaporate leaving only what washed off of your parts behind. If cleaning requires the use of brushes to break up soiled areas, use brushes that are appropriate for the materials you're cleaning. All in all, this solution costs about $10 for tools, and about $15 a gallon for mineral spirits. NO auto parts store solution like degreasers, or stinky, hazardous, toxic chemicals like brake cleaner will deliver these results. If you do this once, you'll be spoiled rotten. You will keep coming back to this mobile parts washer again and again whenever you need to degrease something. It's that good. Machine shops will clean your parts for you. You can do this without leaving your garage. Bring your own air compressor, and the bigger the better because of recovery time... but the siphon action isn't physically complicated, and anything from a pancake air compressor on-up will work. Oh... one more thing... Oil the &$^% out of cast iron parts when you're done. When stripped of oil, they will rust nearly instantly on contact with water or acids from your skin. Oil them. Soak them in clean oil afterwards. Tools you'll need... Siphon-feed blow gun: http://www.sears.com/shc/s/t_10153_12605?tName=air-siphon-gun.html http://www.thefind.com/hardware/info-blow-gun-siphon-sprayer ***** In the UK, Mineral Spirits are called White Spirits. ***** In China, White Spirits is pronounced "bok WHY?" with emphasis on why. Literally translated, that's "white ghost". It also means "egg" but I believe it's said a little differently. ba kwai is a derogatory slang term that Chinese use to describe white people. I'm not kidding. Either way, being called an egg might possibly bother a white person somewhere? Perhaps this is why I forgot to mention it in the video? It's too funny of a fact to leave out of the description. So, go make breakfast and have fun with your cheap, racist parts washer... no matter what color skin you're wrapped in. Mineral Spirits can be bought at your local hardware store. Mineral Spirits MSDS sheet (for the stuff I used in the video): http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=brands&id =16025013 Paint trays, wire brushes, and empty paint cans are also available at your local hardware store. I found that a 1 quart can with the lid cut off is the perfect size for cleaning pistons. Yes, you did see me bust out the Farberware can opener in my garage. A garage is simply a man's kitchen, so I see nothing wrong with this. Of course, it can be a woman's kitchen too... it just needs appliances that are appropriate for use near flammable liquids IF I'm going to be preparing any food while she fixes my car. I would never change my car's oil in a kitchen, though. I also wouldn't use cookware to catch automotive fluids. Just sayin'. * The man made me an 18 minute song in a day. Maybe some of you write music? Words can't describe how grateful I am to receive a quarter of an album from somebody on such short notice, or to explain my gratitude for his contribution.





Hyundai Assembly 6 - Manifolds & Turbo
I love music videos. They're so much easier to narrate. I don't want to upset anyone by not providing commentary about what I'm doing or where this build is going... and this is the video where all that stuff comes together. Quite frankly, I missed you. I really enjoy these little talks we share. In this video is a little fabrication, maintenance, comparison and assembly. Un-boxings, cleanup, break-fix... Variety! You know... The stuff that keeps happening as you wrap up any build. It's not a longblock until it has manifolds, and a turbo build has a few more things than just that in order to make it complete. My attention has now turned towards preparing the chassis and accessories for installation and I promise there will be more involved videos following this one for the hardcore auto techs. Whether you're watching or wrenching on this one, all this stage does is create anxiety for wanting to hurry up and finish the install, but don't rush. Do it right! These are the non-reusable parts for the turbo install. ALL of the other part numbers in the video were shown: MF241255 x2 Oil Drain Bolts (upper) MF101229 x2 Oil Drain Bolts (lower) MF660031 x2 Oil Drain Gasket (washer) MR258477 x2 Oil Drain Gasket (flange) MF660064 x2 Oil Feed Crush Washer (turbo) MF660063 x2 Oil Feed Crush Washer (head) MF660065 x4 Coolant Crush Washer (turbo) MD132656 x4 turbo Bolt (M10 x 80 x 1.25mm) MD132933 x8 turbo Spring Washers Thank you all for keeping up with this build. Thanks especially for the kind comments and interest in this project! You guys are the best!





Blueprint 108 - inspect the deck
There's a reason why there are no subtitled specifications in this video for the block. It's because they don't exist in either service manual, 1g or 2g. You're not supposed to remove material from a block on the deck surface because it has ill effects on parts of the combustion chamber geometry, and alters your compression ratio. It can be done intentionally in some cases for a desired side-affect, but if you have to deck a 4g63 head, it would be advised to use a thicker head gasket. The Mitsubishi Multi-Layered-Steel or MLS gasket is slightly thicker than the OEM composite gasket. Also, HKS, Power Enterprise, Cometic, and other performance brands all make MLS gaskets that are .065 and thicker. THERE IS ONE ERROR IN THE VIDEO. I said a block with .002" warpage is junk. I was completely and totally wrong. While I don't wish to spread misinformation, I don't think it's a big enough error to warrant re-editing this video. I just wasn't paying attention. .002" warpage on a cylinder head is the service limit before it needs machining. I meant to say .02"... or two HUNDREDTHS (not thousandths) of an inch. ...and here's my justification... A warped block to me is junk either way even if its minimal because your MLS gasket will never seal unless both the head and the block are perfectly flat. Trust your machine shop to get the values for how much is taken off, and buy the correct thickness gasket for your machine work. A factory head gasket (composite) is .051" The MLS Mitsubishi gasket is available in the stock .051 and a .062" Cometic makes gaskets up to .072" There are some brands that go as high as .127", but I'd have thrown both the block and head away long before then.





Out with the old, in with the new.
I bet you were expecting a different car. Sorry. I didn't want to, nor did I ask to troll you with this video. It's just what it is. I set out to burn some rubber, drop some bass, and have some fun in the Hyundai... and this is what happened. Testing in this video... aside from the opening scene, I shot this video at 1080p30 using an head-mounted Sony HDR-AS30V Action Cam. The camera was contained in the incuded waterproof case because I needed to test the audio with it. It sounds great with out it. It sounds only good with it. This is a test to see how I can adjust my shooting style to add 1st-person perspective to my videos for everyone's benefit. The follow-up video will be shot entirely with the "big camera" (Canon XH-A1s)





Turbo Tom's Hyundai Elantra Greddy Type-S BOV
Untuned and incomplete, low Boost, but BOV doesn't care :)





Major Huge Announcement
This video is a quick update on the projects here on Jafromobile right now, as well as a tour and history lesson on my latest addition. I'm always hard at work to bring you all new material based on Mitsubishi production and partnerships from 1987-1999. Also covered are what's necessary to resurrect a car that's been sitting for many years. If it's got a 4g63, to me... it's always worth saving. My channel now has 4 Mitsubishi-powered projects in the works which should be capable of delivering tons of new material. I'd like to welcome all of you from the forums. My history with Mitsubishi began in 1997, and hasn't taken a day off since. Owning one of these has been long overdue for me, and you guys have been a wealth of knowledge that helped me along my travels. An asset to the DSM community, even though this isn't a DSM.





Hyundai 4g63 Assembly Part 2
Continued progress on the Hyundai build. I've covered most of this before in detail, so I'll save you the fancy narrative. The torque settings are in both the info below, and the video shown on the wrench. You will see this process again here, and each time new aspects of assembly tools and materials will be used. SPECIAL THANKS TO ROJODELCHOCOLATE for the audio track. Oil Pan Bolts 18 7 M6 x12 5'lbs MD012109 2 7 M6 x8 5'lbs MD167134 (some cars use 10mm shorties but 8mm will work) 1g Front Case Bolts qty/GR/DIA/length/torque/part# 4 7 M8 x20 17'lbs MF140225 1 7 M8 x25 17'lbs MF140227 1 7 M8 x40 17'lbs MF140233 1 4 M10 x30 22'lbs MF140062 (6-bolt) 1 7 M8 x40 17'lbs MF140233 (7-bolt) 1g oil pump housing bolts 5 4 M8 x20 12'lbs MF140025 (4qty for 7-bolt and add 1 MD141302 screw) 1 10 M8 x16 27'lbs MD040758 (Balance/Stub shaft bolt) Oil Pump Sprocket Nut 1 11 M10 x 40'lbs MD095237 *use Loctite 1g oil filter housing bolts (that I used w/6-bolt water-cooled OFH) 2 7 M8 x40 14'lbs MF241261 1 7 M8 x20 14'lbs MF140225 1 7 M8 x55 14'lbs MF241264 1 7 M8 x65 14'lbs MF241266 1g Rear Main Seal Housing Bolts 5 7 M6 x16 10'lbs MF140205 (6-bolt) 5 7 M6 x14 10'lbs MF140204 (7-bolt) 1g Timing Tesnsioner Bolts 2 7 M8 x51 17'lbs MD129350 (6-bolt) 2 7 M8 x55 17'lbs MD190987 (7-bolt) 1g Timing Tensioner Arm Bolt 1 8 M8 x16 16'lbs MF241251 Bolt 1 x x x x MD129421 Washer Flywheel bolts 6 11 M12 x22.5 98'lbs MD040557* (ALL Manual transmission 6-bolt cars) 7 11 M12 x21.5 98'lbs MD302074 (ALL Manual transmission 7-bolt turbos) * Part substitution # 2795A956 Crank Sprocket Bolt & Washer 1 11 M14 x40 87'LBS MD074255 CRANKSHAFT CENTER BOLT 1 x M14 x14.5 MD012455 CRANKSHAFT WASHER For gasket, seal and service parts information, please refer to my 6-bolt 4g63 shortblock rebuild parts video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ofWnFXkix3w For timing belt service parts information and tools, please refer to my 4g63 Timing Belt Parts video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BN7TOVrkUNQ In 29 and 3/4 minutes I offer a detailed explanation of how to do a 6-bolt AND 7-Bolt 4g63 Front Case & Oil Pump Rebuild: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPhyazI1fYc For 33 minutes I cover every oil filter housing including servicing information, rebuilding, modifying the oil filter housing, and the unabridged description of how oil pressure works in my 4g63 Oil Filter Housings video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X88tw1UFs_M





Cylinder Head 205 - Degree DOHC Camshafts
This video is all about establishing your valve timing baseline, and adjusting your camshafts to the manufacturer's spec. It's only ONE of several steps that should be performed when you're assembling your engine on an engine stand. Establishing these conditions with accuracy while your engine installed in the car is a near-impossibility, and the reason why... is demonstrated in this video. There are several challenges to overcome when performing these procedures on a 4gxx series Mitsubishi engine, and they're all defeated here. The cylinder head used in this video is a J1 spec '92 Hyundai Elantra small-combustion chamber head which has had several valve jobs and has been resurfaced multiple times by budget engine remanufacturers who didn't care about quality control, as well as performance shops who do. It has had no less than .040" removed from the head gasket surface, the valves are recessed because of all the valve jobs performed, and at some point when it was cut, it wasn't level. Removing material from the deck surface will change the installed camshaft centerline, and that will change your engine's valve timing events even if all other parts remain the same. I would claim this is a multi-part video except that I've got the videos broken up by topic already, and this one is all about setting your cams to the manufacturer's specification. It is not the end of testing that will be performed with these tools. The basics concerning the process and tool fabrication are covered here. Further discussion on this topic concerning the effects of advancing or retarding camshafts from spec, and for checking your valve clearance will be in the videos that follow. I had to end this video after the manufacturer's spec was achieved to make it easier to digest, and because it would have created a video greater than one hour in length despite the break-neck speeds that things happen here on Jafromobile. Where your cams are set determine how the swept volume of the combustion chamber gets used. The information on the manufacturer's spec sheet is their recommendation for baseline settings that will help you get the most out of those camshafts. Whether or not your engine can operate with those specifications without additional hardware or without causing a catastrophic failure will be expanded upon in Cylinder Head 206. The next video should be used as a companion to this video because establishing the manufacturer's baseline is not the end of the assembly or testing process. It's only half the battle. Should you be lucky enough to find your combination of parts allow your camshafts to fit and requires no additional adjustment after assembly, the steps in this video and in Cylinder Head 206 should still be performed if you are doing the assembly yourself. Failure to inspect these variables may lead to a tuning nightmare once the engine is back in the car, hard starts, or worse... bent valves and damaged wrist pins. Making these tools and performing these steps will give you the peace of mind to know with certainty that your engine is operating safely at its peak performance.





Friday Night "Street" challenge.
Racing trailer queens at Richmond Dragway's so-called "street" event again. Making a few passes with the Hyundai Elantra to illustrate a point. Someone asked about timeslips recently and I wanted to show one of the types of information you can gain from examining what's on it. Information about yourself, and your car. How well you're driving it, and how well your equipment is working for you. I built it up with the current video explaining the 60' time measurement while installing compound tires. I figured that timing was appropriate since tires have everything to do with traction and acceleration. The 60' is all about maximizing acceleration over the 1st 60 feet of the track. The results of running different 60' times show up differently at the end of the track. A FWD, RWD and AWD car will exhibit different characteristics based on contact patches, weight distribution and rotating mass associated with each setup. But FWD is by far the most challenging to deal with getting up out of the hole. Mastering the launch with your car means more at the track than making all the horsepower in the world at once. Getting it down takes practice. Here's a quick guide for how to set your expectations. So if drag racing is your thing... always be convinced you could do it better, and never stop trying to get there.





Hyundai Assembly 4 - Balancing Rods
I edited this video to its finished state, and RojoDelChocolate handed me a track with no collaboration that was the right length and rhythm. I literally did nothing to the video once the audio track was dropped in, and that's just how it went. I can't believe it. It's like when you're pumping gas into a Ford F150 full-blast and release the pump handle to stop right on $80.00 even. He's got more musical talent in his pinky fingernail than I have mechanical ability in my spleen, appendix and tonsils combined. Thank you RojoDelChocolate. Here I'm cleaning up the fly cuts, balancing the piston and rod assemblies and preparing to double-check my valve clearance. I had to start by cleaning up and re-lubricating every part that was removed to prevent contamination of the assembly. This is the tedious part of doing the job right. We learned that this whole engine assembly was pretty far-gone in previous videos, way past its service limits, so making it fit and work again takes extensive testing, machining, and re-testing to ensure all of the parts fit. This is likely the most challenging build I will perform on any car in my driveway. It has been so far. But because I have not demonstrated the basics of engine balancing beyond what a machine shop has to do to zero balance a flat-plane crankshaft, I thought I'd give it its own video right here with one of the test assemblies. When you balance rods by themselves, you balance the big-end and the pin-bore separately. You get weights of both ends of the rod using a jig and a process that I don't demonstrate in this video. The reason you do this is because the position of the weight behaves differently relative to its distance from the crankshaft pin. Weight on the big end has less of an effect than if there's extra weight on the pin bore. The best balanced engines have every part of the piston and rod assemblies balanced separately within .1 grams using the method I just described, and not the method shown in this video. The method shown here involves weighing ALL of the piston and rod assembly components together, and then taking out the difference just on the casting lines of the connecting rod. They were already off-balance and had never been balanced before. This is an improvement, not perfection. It's still something this engine needed to have done. I'm not using the big-end/small-end method here because these pistons are pressed-on and if I try to remove them from the rod, it will shatter the piston skirts. No thank you. I'm not replacing these pistons. The reason I grind down the casting lines is because it's weight is in a neutral territory, extending from the big end to the small end. It's easier to take an even amount off when you grind across the entire length of the rods. This method leaves a lot up to assumption as there's no way to determine which end of the rod is heavier, or if the weight is in a wrist pin or piston. All this does is ensure the crankshaft is spinning an even amount of weight on all 4 of its rod journals. Grams of weight turn into pounds of force at idle speeds. My goal is to remove that vibration at any and all rotations per minute if I can. So I make them all the same within 1.0 grams of their combined weight. If you're assembling and balancing all NEW parts, not parts that have worn together and need to go back in the same holes... you will have to balance the individual parts and pieces. This is the poor man's method. Even with the new parts you still do the poor man's method once you're done balancing the individual parts and assemble them, but sometimes when you're lucky with the new parts, you can just swap around the rods, pins and fasteners to balance the weights on each assembly and not have to grind anything at all. That's awfully nice when that happens. You know the Hyundai won't let me get away with that. Removing stress risers might help strengthen the rods, but it's not what I'm after here or else I would have removed the whole casting line from all of them. These rods should be fine for my goals. My goal is to remove just enough from all of the fatter rods (weight wise) to match the lightest one. Balancing an inline 4 engine with a flat-plane crank is easy if you have already balanced the crankshaft. This crank was already balanced for the GSX motor on a previous occasion. It's zero'd out. In order to balance the rotating assembly, all you do is make the piston and rod assemblies weigh identically to its neighbors. Just 3 grams of weight can produce over a hundred pounds of lateral forces at red-line so this is an aspect of engine building that you should not overlook. All you need to do is get all of them within 1 gram. The scale I'm using measures whole grams, so that's all I can do anyway. This method is acceptable for balancing a rotating assembly as long as you're smart about how to remove the weight.





Jamie's 92 Hyundai Elantra with bastard 4g63 swap
There's a history both behind this car, and the friendship with this person. I met him 10 years ago following a random conversation that I injected myself into between 2 strangers at an auto parts store. I had just bought a '92 Civic CX with crap compression and was picking up some service parts to keep it limping and useful while I built my DSM. I overheard him mention "4g63" to somebody as I walked by, so I turned around and introduced myself without any clue that he was one of the "realest" people I've ever known. What occurred for me in the following discussion was an awakening on my part. He led me to an adjacent parking lot where an un-assuming Hyundai Elantra sat. This isn't the one, but is one of many factory cars that he's swapped a 4g63 into. What he managed to get through my big thick skull was there were lots of great inconspicuous chassis that you can simply bolt a 4g63 into. Over time it became evident where you can find lots of "racing" parts, from factory equipment on various mini-vans, station wagons, much of the Hyundai line-up from '92-'95. During the "DSM Years", there were plenty of cars from other manufacturers that made dynamite donors, and this sparked my ability to be frugal in some of my ventures. If you ever meet Jamie, expect his knowledge of car parts both inside and outside the realm of Mitsubishi to be as unassuming on the surface as the car in this video. He has true talent. Finds peace and happiness in a junkyard full of decay, and skills that create useful high-performance art from what many consider rubbish. Because he's already taken time walking around with parts from one car and bolting them on to others to see if they'll fit, worked as a machinist's apprentice rebuilding everything under the sun, and done the tech work to analyze failures in all of it, he's often my go-to guy for advice when things aren't working correctly. Many times he's come through for me in a pinch and shed light on something I didn't understand. That goes both for examples in the automotive domain, and in real life when I've hit hard times. Many of my parts for the Colt came from his past builds on various Mitsubishis and Hyundais. In fact... many of my Colt parts have come from this very car. He gave this chassis to somebody, and they returned it later because life didn't let them finish it. I don't think it took even a month once he put his mind to working on it to get it in this state, and it was motorless-and-in-pieces. I can't wait to see these parts get bolted on this car. I think we'll have a new textbook definition of sleeper when he's done.





Hyundai Assembly 8 - Install Engine & Transmission
HehHEY! Look how long the video is. Time to free up the engine stand. There were several modifications whose completion required installing the engine and I wrap those up in this video. Stuff like the clutch hydraulics, GM alternator B-terminal wiring, wiring harness, power steering pump reservoir line, fuel system and radiator installs... all that stuff needs an engine first. You already know what else is coming, you saw the 1-hour special (Hyundai Assembly 7). This is the other 9 hours of work that follows it. Necessary stuff, but I've covered most of it before. Please refer to the transmission series if you wish to see the slower instructional version. The correct torques are listed for the various bell housing bolts only because those are the ones that so many people get wrong. I keep listing them because perhaps the repetition can help you spew those specs and which bolts they belong to to someone who needs it. I've been criticized (pretty sure it's all constructive) for spending money on this car. I will have built one of the least expensive 12 second cars of anyone else I know. I'm pretty sure I disqualified myself from the 24 hours of Lemons series ($500 limit), but none of those cars could take me in the 1/4 mile. Yes I'll wager on that one with any car that has competed in that series and can prove it. Win or lose, I'll film it and make you famous. Anyone who's raced in that series can appreciate what I've done here. Aside from a few recent engine management purchases, most of this car is built from reconstituted scrap parts of other projects. One of the upgrades we haven't talked about was a Christmas present. But all of those parts are compatible with all 4 of my projects and can be re-purposed if necessary. I needed a platform to test them on because I may decide to use them on all of the other projects eventually. This isn't costing me money so much as it's costing me time. I'm really happy with how it's turning out, and there will be more to come, soon.





Hyundai accent 2.0 turbo
i finally did my accent turbo i got tier of the all motor and the spray but i still have the spray to try it later





Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?




Similar 1/4 mile timeslips to browse:

1994 Hyundai Elantra GT42 Turbo: 12.201 @ 123.030
Rick Inacio, Engine: 4g63, Turbos: GT42 Tires: M/T 26


1992 Hyundai Elantra : 12.960 @ 108.420
Doug Elfman, Engine: 4g63, Supercharger: no Turbos: 14b Tires: mt street slicks


2002 Hyundai Elantra GT: 14.965 @ 96.247
Steve, Engine: 2.0l DOHC, Supercharger: na Turbos: na Tires: hankook


2003 Hyundai Elantra GLS: 15.510 @ 89.640
FordFasteRR, Engine: 2.0L Twin Cam, Tires: Yokohama AVS ES-100


2014 Hyundai Elantra GT: 16.410 @ 84.510
MT, Engine: Front Engine, FWD I-4, aluminum block/head,


2011 Hyundai Elantra Limited: 16.910 @ 84.110
ET, Engine: Dohc 16v - valve inline 4: 148 horsepower, Tires: Continental ContiProContact 215/45R-17 87H


1999 Hyundai Elantra GL: 17.343 @ 80.920
Paul,


 


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