Jamie's Boosted Hyundai Elantra (Oct '11)

This is an old video that I've decided to post practically un-edited. A few parts were skipped regarding off-topic babble in order to keep it under 10 minutes. You've seen this car in another video. There really is no way to determine how many different cars contributed to this build. Every last part on it (except the one featured in this video) was previously used on another vehicle. Absolutely nothing came new in a box. The owner put enough 4g63's together in a lifetime to have extra gaskets and seals laying around to exclusively use junkyard parts to build a whole car. In the last video, you saw me contribute all the turbo parts to this build. Used 150,000 mile old stock DSM turbo parts including a worked 14b. I'm happy to show it to you all put together. Check the other video of this car if you want more details on the engine build. None of the internals have changed.

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Jafro's Hyundai Elantra Surprise
There are some things you can't put a price on. I'm not just talking about the Hyundai. I'm talking about Jamie. I have the best friends in the world. Look what Jamie just did for all of your entertainment. He literally donated it to me to play with on this channel. This isn't just for me. Think about it. It's the only FWD DSM in my driveway, and the only one I'm likely to have. With this combination of parts, I could not have a greater challenge making this car stick. Because right now it doesn't at all. Torque steer ends at about 5700 RPMs in third gear. Boost is instantaneous. This car could never make good use of any larger of a turbo. I'm convinced with the right combo of tricks to gain timing and tweaks to make it stick, and that it will run deep into the 12's just like it is. This car is a kick in the pants to drive. A rolling burnout. Be careful with that downshift.

Turbo Elantra Bearing Failure Diagnosis
I had time to look at this thing up close. Go through the oil system, and check out all the bearings. Looks like another good study for my oil system series because it's the opposite problem that my GSX experienced. High oil pressure can be remedied a number of ways, but left unchecked can actually take a toll on your bearings. The way your engine bearings work, the parts they suspend are supported only by an oil film layer, and flow needs to be right in order for it to work as an actual bearing. If the oil supply is insufficient, then it loses the ability to suspend the part causing it to crash into the bearing surface. If oil flow is too great, friction is increased, the flow becomes turbulent, and the oil film doesn't form properly. High oil pressure can float and spin rod bearings, and that's worst-case scenario. I had several un-favorable conditions going on inside this engine and that makes it a little bit difficult to link what my engine experienced to any one singular thing. I think it's easier to look at it like some sort of perfect storm. From sub-standard parts for how the engine components would be used, to oil pressure, to part fatigue, to part history to abuse... this thing's got a little bit of everything working against it and that's why it's such a hilarious car. It was given to me with one condition. "See what this thing will do, and see how long it goes before it breaks." My take on it is, the parts are still less than ideal, and they've still got life left in them. It's worth fixing. These parts are worthless as a race motor, and normally I'd have junked 'em, but it's the Hyundai.

Hyundai 11 - 1st Startup & Heat Cycle
Thank you for clicking "The Link" in the end of the previous video. On a 1st startup, there are lots of things to pay attention to. It's hard to know which one to look at first, but a good rule of thumb is to start with oil pressure and go from there. If you don't achieve a healthy oil pressure level immediately at startup, shut it down. Failure to pressurize the oil system will quickly kill all of your hard work within seconds as there are no break in lubricants available that will save you from a lack of oil pressure. The reason for this is that your rotating parts float on a cushion of oil. All your main and rod bearings do is regulate the thickness of that oil film layer. If the oil supply runs out, metal-on-metal contact begins and that continues to damage those parts until they receive oil pressure. Everything that needed to be said about the oil pump preparations was in the video. Every car with hydraulic lifters makes lots of noise on their first startup. It's just what they do. If you use a low-temperature grease to prepare your oil pump assembly, then the noise will subside faster. If you use multi-purpose brake grease like I did, then it will take until the engine is at full operating temperature and your radiator fans cut on before it melts, passes through the lifters, and stops blocking oil flow to the valve train. The lifters aren't the only source of oil for the camshafts, and a 4g63 utilizes roller rockers, so during the noisy portion of the break-in, no damage is being caused by this noise. It's just important to try to listen through it and see if there are any other kinds of knocks, squeals or bangs that are out of place. You'll see me do that quite obviously in the video. Don't try to tune or adjust things on a cold engine. Your efforts are useless until its up to its normal operating temperature because there are engine components and ECU routines that change dependent upon the engine temperature. After the engine has warmed up, set your base timing, adjust the idle speed, and then go after other factors that may affect the idle performance. You don't tune your fuel trims, ignition timing or anything else until you achieve a steady, stable, closed loop idle. Lastly, don't drive the car until it's at least idling properly. I will do 2 more heat cycles addressing bugs and tuning issues, and after the 3rd heat cycle I drive 'er around, adjust the clutch, re-torque the axle nuts and then change the oil. Thank you for following this car's build. I can't say that enough. You guys, not me, you guys make all of this possible.