Drag Racing 1/4 Mile times 0-60 Dyno Fast Cars Muscle Cars

Jamie's Boosted Hyundai Elantra (Oct '11)

This is an old video that I've decided to post practically un-edited. A few parts were skipped regarding off-topic babble in order to keep it under 10 minutes. You've seen this car in another video. There really is no way to determine how many different cars contributed to this build. Every last part on it (except the one featured in this video) was previously used on another vehicle. Absolutely nothing came new in a box. The owner put enough 4g63's together in a lifetime to have extra gaskets and seals laying around to exclusively use junkyard parts to build a whole car. In the last video, you saw me contribute all the turbo parts to this build. Used 150,000 mile old stock DSM turbo parts including a worked 14b. I'm happy to show it to you all put together. Check the other video of this car if you want more details on the engine build. None of the internals have changed.


 


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Jafro's Hyundai Elantra Surprise
There are some things you can't put a price on. I'm not just talking about the Hyundai. I'm talking about Jamie. I have the best friends in the world. Look what Jamie just did for all of your entertainment. He literally donated it to me to play with on this channel. This isn't just for me. Think about it. It's the only FWD DSM in my driveway, and the only one I'm likely to have. With this combination of parts, I could not have a greater challenge making this car stick. Because right now it doesn't at all. Torque steer ends at about 5700 RPMs in third gear. Boost is instantaneous. This car could never make good use of any larger of a turbo. I'm convinced with the right combo of tricks to gain timing and tweaks to make it stick, and that it will run deep into the 12's just like it is. This car is a kick in the pants to drive. A rolling burnout. Be careful with that downshift.





Friday Night "Street" challenge.
Racing trailer queens at Richmond Dragway's so-called "street" event again. Making a few passes with the Hyundai Elantra to illustrate a point. Someone asked about timeslips recently and I wanted to show one of the types of information you can gain from examining what's on it. Information about yourself, and your car. How well you're driving it, and how well your equipment is working for you. I built it up with the current video explaining the 60' time measurement while installing compound tires. I figured that timing was appropriate since tires have everything to do with traction and acceleration. The 60' is all about maximizing acceleration over the 1st 60 feet of the track. The results of running different 60' times show up differently at the end of the track. A FWD, RWD and AWD car will exhibit different characteristics based on contact patches, weight distribution and rotating mass associated with each setup. But FWD is by far the most challenging to deal with getting up out of the hole. Mastering the launch with your car means more at the track than making all the horsepower in the world at once. Getting it down takes practice. Here's a quick guide for how to set your expectations. So if drag racing is your thing... always be convinced you could do it better, and never stop trying to get there.





1g AWD Rear Subframe Bushing Replacement
These are Boostx rear subframe bushings for a 1g AWD. The factory rubber bushings can be affected by heat, cold, oils, age, air, dry rotting... they were 22 years old, and might not have been bad for a stock chassis... but this car isn't stock anymore. We're attempting to replace them in this video in order to stiffen the rear sub-frame and improve this car's launch characteristics. If the bushings are weaker than the power you're putting down vs. the weight you're moving, they can give, affecting toe, camber, caster and generally reduce the traction and handling characteristics of the car. Substituting Polyurethane bushings in place of the factory rubber bushings is a great way to solve this problem. Removing the factory bushings seems complicated if you've never done it. What it really takes is just patience and fire (and a lot of it). During this video you'll see us get impatient and grab an air chisel. That's the wrong tool for the job. It makes for cool video footage, but it simply can't do what fire does for this job. The torch you use makes a difference. The nozzle on most propane torches is a little too small to do this efficiently. The bigger nozzle the better. You'll see and hear us cover this. You can burn these bushings out with a small fire, but you'll make up for that with your time. I've received lots of great comments whenever I break out the torch. Yes, I'd love to have an Oxy-acetylene rosebud that can burn through plate steel. Yes, I'd love to have had the foresight to buy a MAP cylinder instead of propane. But the propane method for burning these out is really ideal because it's less likely to melt the steel bushing surrounds. Less of the rubber becomes airborne particulates with a colder flame. But yes, it takes longer. I think we spent a half-hour to 45 minutes torching both sets of bushings out. Once the majority of the rubber is burnt away from the sleeve, use a brass-bristled wire wheel to remove the rest. We didn't have a brass wheel big enough for the K-member bushings, so we used a steel wheel. Just keep in mind not to be too aggressive or use the wrong tools like carbide bits or grinding stones for the excess because you want to leave as much metal in there as you can. The bushings need to fit tight inside the sleeves when you're done. There are 6 washers used on the AWD subframe that have rubber castings on them to fit inside the factory rubber bushings. With the poly bushings there are no provisions for these washers the way they are. The rubber is no longer necessary, so burning that off allows you to re-use the washers rather than replace them. Be aware of which washers come from where. 2 of them have dimples in them that recess into the rear "moustache bar, boomerang bar, thing that holds the rear in". You want the big-side of that bushing against the dimpled washer, and the ring side of the bushing against the chassis where those parts meet. If you press the bushing in backwards, there's nothing to hold that spacer ring supplied with those bushings into the assembly. It will just fall off. I can't wait to hear about how these things work out because my 2g has a 100% factory suspension including the struts that came with it 160,000 miles ago. I'd like to give it the same treatment that this car received.





GSX Startup (Nov. '09)
I wanted to deliver a video without my normal beats and fast-forward edits. I wanted to represent this moment for the subscribers, fans and friends exactly the way it happened.





Jamie's 92 Hyundai Elantra with bastard 4g63 swap
There's a history both behind this car, and the friendship with this person. I met him 10 years ago following a random conversation that I injected myself into between 2 strangers at an auto parts store. I had just bought a '92 Civic CX with crap compression and was picking up some service parts to keep it limping and useful while I built my DSM. I overheard him mention "4g63" to somebody as I walked by, so I turned around and introduced myself without any clue that he was one of the "realest" people I've ever known. What occurred for me in the following discussion was an awakening on my part. He led me to an adjacent parking lot where an un-assuming Hyundai Elantra sat. This isn't the one, but is one of many factory cars that he's swapped a 4g63 into. What he managed to get through my big thick skull was there were lots of great inconspicuous chassis that you can simply bolt a 4g63 into. Over time it became evident where you can find lots of "racing" parts, from factory equipment on various mini-vans, station wagons, much of the Hyundai line-up from '92-'95. During the "DSM Years", there were plenty of cars from other manufacturers that made dynamite donors, and this sparked my ability to be frugal in some of my ventures. If you ever meet Jamie, expect his knowledge of car parts both inside and outside the realm of Mitsubishi to be as unassuming on the surface as the car in this video. He has true talent. Finds peace and happiness in a junkyard full of decay, and skills that create useful high-performance art from what many consider rubbish. Because he's already taken time walking around with parts from one car and bolting them on to others to see if they'll fit, worked as a machinist's apprentice rebuilding everything under the sun, and done the tech work to analyze failures in all of it, he's often my go-to guy for advice when things aren't working correctly. Many times he's come through for me in a pinch and shed light on something I didn't understand. That goes both for examples in the automotive domain, and in real life when I've hit hard times. Many of my parts for the Colt came from his past builds on various Mitsubishis and Hyundais. In fact... many of my Colt parts have come from this very car. He gave this chassis to somebody, and they returned it later because life didn't let them finish it. I don't think it took even a month once he put his mind to working on it to get it in this state, and it was motorless-and-in-pieces. I can't wait to see these parts get bolted on this car. I think we'll have a new textbook definition of sleeper when he's done.





Calculate Your Compression Ratio
This is everything you need to do to calculate your compression ratio. No foolin'. Every equation and process demonstrated. Find all your variables. Know your exact compression ratio in every cylinder. This is how you do it. Just because your service manual says your car is 7.8:1 or 8.5:1 compression doesn't mean that it is. Whenever there are casting irregularities, variations in piston height, parts that have been machined, non-OE parts, or changes to your head gasket selection, your compression ratio WILL change. It's highly probable that you're only CLOSE to spec if you've never touched your engine at all since it was "born", and that it doesn't MATCH spec. Even if it did, how would you know? This. 5 variables. V1 Swept Volume V2 Deck Volume V3 Piston-to-deck clearance V4 Piston dish cc's V5 Head combustion chamber cc's The ratio math: V1+V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at BDC V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at TDC The ratio is... (V1+V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) : (V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) or BDC ÷ TDC : TDC ÷ TDC First you fill in the variables, then you calculate volumes, then you add the volumes, then you reduce the ratio (fraction). It's that easy. Here are your magic numbers: 0.7854 = Pi quartered to the ten thousandth 16.387 = number of cc's in a cubic inch. If you divide any number in cc's by 16.387 it gives you inches. If you multiply any number in cubic inches by 16.387 it gives you cc's. Quartering pi lets you use the calculation: BORE x BORE x STROKE x .7854 = volume of a cylinder instead of... π x (BORE ÷ 2) x (BORE ÷ 2) x STROKE = volume of a cylinder Either way is right. You get the same result if you calculate pi to the ten thousandth. While I apologize for all the math, no I don't. I'm really not sorry. You actually clicked here for it whether you realize it or not. This is ALL the math, the tests, and the whole process to calculate your cylinder volumes and compression individually even if you don't know any of your variables yet. All of my numbers are present for those who want to calculate out the last 3 cylinders out of curiosity just to see how it affects cylinder volumes and compression ratios from one cylinder to the next. Why would I do that for you? Why would I deprive you of that practice? Just assume that all 4 of my combustion chambers are 41.75 ml if you do this. Clicking like share and subscribe helps a channel grow. It also motivates me. Don't sweat the camera. It's enough to know that so many of you care about what I'm doing here. From the bottom of my atmospheric dump, I thank you all! This gift horse's teeth are all over the place, but he sometimes poops gold nuggets. PS: Use ATF for your piston dish volume tests, not alcohol. Of course it's better just to use the spec sheet included with your pistons... but not everyone gets that luxury. Water is just fine for head combustion chamber tests. Dry and re-oil all parts that water touches.





Cylinder Head 205 - Degree DOHC Camshafts
This video is all about establishing your valve timing baseline, and adjusting your camshafts to the manufacturer's spec. It's only ONE of several steps that should be performed when you're assembling your engine on an engine stand. Establishing these conditions with accuracy while your engine installed in the car is a near-impossibility, and the reason why... is demonstrated in this video. There are several challenges to overcome when performing these procedures on a 4gxx series Mitsubishi engine, and they're all defeated here. The cylinder head used in this video is a J1 spec '92 Hyundai Elantra small-combustion chamber head which has had several valve jobs and has been resurfaced multiple times by budget engine remanufacturers who didn't care about quality control, as well as performance shops who do. It has had no less than .040" removed from the head gasket surface, the valves are recessed because of all the valve jobs performed, and at some point when it was cut, it wasn't level. Removing material from the deck surface will change the installed camshaft centerline, and that will change your engine's valve timing events even if all other parts remain the same. I would claim this is a multi-part video except that I've got the videos broken up by topic already, and this one is all about setting your cams to the manufacturer's specification. It is not the end of testing that will be performed with these tools. The basics concerning the process and tool fabrication are covered here. Further discussion on this topic concerning the effects of advancing or retarding camshafts from spec, and for checking your valve clearance will be in the videos that follow. I had to end this video after the manufacturer's spec was achieved to make it easier to digest, and because it would have created a video greater than one hour in length despite the break-neck speeds that things happen here on Jafromobile. Where your cams are set determine how the swept volume of the combustion chamber gets used. The information on the manufacturer's spec sheet is their recommendation for baseline settings that will help you get the most out of those camshafts. Whether or not your engine can operate with those specifications without additional hardware or without causing a catastrophic failure will be expanded upon in Cylinder Head 206. The next video should be used as a companion to this video because establishing the manufacturer's baseline is not the end of the assembly or testing process. It's only half the battle. Should you be lucky enough to find your combination of parts allow your camshafts to fit and requires no additional adjustment after assembly, the steps in this video and in Cylinder Head 206 should still be performed if you are doing the assembly yourself. Failure to inspect these variables may lead to a tuning nightmare once the engine is back in the car, hard starts, or worse... bent valves and damaged wrist pins. Making these tools and performing these steps will give you the peace of mind to know with certainty that your engine is operating safely at its peak performance.





Hyundai Elantra 4g63 Shortblock Assembly
HOLD ON TIGHT! HERE WE GO! We begin the blueprint and assembly on my 1992 Hyundai Elantra's bastardized 4g63. The parts used in this are from a mash of different brands and models outside of the typical 2.0L 4g63, but the specs and standards I am following for its assembly are for the 2.0L DOHC. If you want to follow along in your service manual to verify what I've done here in this video, the processes we cover here detail pages 11C-95 through 11C-105 of the 1g Overhaul manual. I would prefer you not rip them from the binding and throw them away, relying only on this video for instruction... but rather use this video as a motivational guide, and as a demonstration of the techniques involved in those sections. You gotta do the cooking by the book. I never had any intention of making instructional videos on this particular car, but after it blew up I slowly realized it's actually a better case study for how a 4g63 ticks than anything else in my driveway. There are several reasons for this. One being that it's a mix of parts that shouldn't be bolted together, and the other is that many of you watching my videos aren't trying to build a 600hp engine out of aftermarket parts. You're trying to put back together what used to be your daily driver. This car covers those bases. Don't think for a second I won't go through this same trouble and level of detail for the GSX. I will. When I do, having this information in this video will give you a better understanding on how and why I do things the way I do when I get there. This was the shortest I could condense this video. I've never uploaded a video this long, and I hope I never have to do it again. It took a month to create on cutting-edge equipment, 16 hours to export, and 9 hours for YouTube to process. My script for the voiceover is 6 times longer than the whole script for the movie Pootie Tang. 6 times. Longer. Than a Hollywood movie.





Cylinder Head 206 - Valve Clearance (& LSA)
This video is the companion and continuation video for Cylinder Head 205. In Cylinder Head 205 we covered the tools and technique for setting valve timing versus the factory-recommended specifications. It didn't work, thus; this video. How do I know it didn't work? Watch this video. The reason this is a companion video is because anyone changing their valve timing must also CHECK their valve clearance or risk bending valves. If I can install aftermarket cams, then I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I move cam gears on an engine that was previously running, then I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I have milled my head or block, I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I have installed larger valves, I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. Mitsubishi doesn't build a whole lot of wiggle room into their valvetrains. They keep the valves pretty tight to maximize performance and a 4g63 IS an interference engine. Note that if you follow the recommendations in this video and damage your valvetrain that I am not responsible. Here I demonstrate all of the techniques to ensure that damage never occurs because these tests are performed PRIOR to the engine ever starting, and prove that clearance is adequate for THE PARTS I SHOW HERE ON CAMERA. There can be components installed in other rotating assemblies that require additional clearance to be built into your valve clearance such as aluminum rods, or other alloys employed in the casting and forging of rotating assembly parts and valves. I strongly urge you to check with those manufacturers for their recommendations regarding thermal expansion, stretch, bounce rocker gap or float prior to making any adjustments, and use this video only as a documentation of my experience. In other words, it's my opinion. What works in your engine will likely be very different from mine, but the tests and the math shown here will work the same with your build. To find your intake valve clearance... Add your intake valve opening degrees (btdc) to your intake valve closing degrees (abdc) to 180°. IO + IC + 180 = DURATION DURATION ÷ 2 = LOBE CENTERLINE LOBE CENTERLINE - IO = INSTALLED INTAKE CENTERLINE To find your Exhaust valve clearance... Add your Exhaust valve opening degrees (bbdc) to your intake valve closing degrees (atdc) to 180°. EO + EC + 180 = DURATION DURATION ÷ 2 = LOBE CENTERLINE LOBE CENTERLINE - EC = INSTALLED Exhaust CENTERLINE To get your Lobe Separation Angle, ADD your INSTALLED INTAKE CENTERLINE to your INSTALLED Exhaust CENTERLINE and divide that result by 2. Intake Centerline + Exhaust Centerline ÷ 2 = LSA Tight Lobe Separation Angles * MOVE TORQUE LOWER IN THE POWER BAND * INCREASE MAXIMUM TORQUE OUTPUT * INCREASE CYLINDER PRESSURE * INCREASE CRANKING COMPRESSION * INCREASE EFFECTIVE COMPRESSION * INCREASE COMBUSTION CHAMBER SCAVENGING EFFECT * SHORTEN YOUR POWER BAND * REDUCE IDLE VACUUM! * REDUCE IDLE STABILITY * INCREASE LIKELIHOOD OF KNOCK! * INCREASE OVERLAP * DECREASE PISTON TO VALVE CLEARANCE! Wide Lobe Separation Angles * MOVE TORQUE HIGHER IN THE POWER BAND * DECREASE MAXIMUM TORQUE OUTPUT * LENGTHEN YOUR POWER BAND * DECREASE CYLINDER PRESSURE * DECREASE LIKELIHOOD OF KNOCK * DECREASE CRANKING COMPRESSION * DECREASE EFFECTIVE COMPRESSION * INCREASE IDLE VACUUM * IMPROVE IDLE STABILITY * DECREASE OVERLAP * DECREASE COMBUSTION CHAMBER SCAVENGING EFFECT * INCREASE PISTON TO VALVE CLEARANCE There's more that I want to say about Lobe Separation Angle (LSA). If you're tuning a DOHC engine with cam gears, you're very lucky to go through all this trouble. The pushrod and SOHC crowd can't change their lobe separation angles without replacing their camshaft, and on many engines that means removing the cylinder heads. On a 4g63 with adjustable gears, you loosen the lock bolts, turn, lock it back down and you've adjusted your LSA. This is a luxury which if you've never had to build a SOHC or a pushrod engine and install camshafts that you take for granted. DOHC tuning permits the ability to alter the opening and closing events of the valves independently of one another and perfect the valve timing during tuning without having to completely remove and replace the valvetrain. What this also means is that the pushrod crowd needs to know and understand a lot more about their camshaft profiles prior to making their purchase as we [the DOHC crowd] do. They have to be on their A-game when they drop the coin on a new cam or else things get expensive really quick. Lobe separation angle says more about how camshafts behave than duration and lift, but all 3 should be carefully scrutinized when you're making that determination. Yes, I did actually animate my engine's valve timing exactly the way HKS said to set it up. Yes those are all actual photos of my parts. Yes that was the biggest Photoshop file I've ever created.





Jafromobile Update
LOOK! The update is actually typed here in the description. The gear-head in me never stops. I took a vacation. It still doesn't stop when I do that, either. It's just who I am. I owe you all an update. This has been the longest break in uploading I've ever taken. I've never posted anything personal like this before. I probably won't leave this up for long, but several of you have sent me messages checking on me to make sure I'm okay... and this is the easiest way to reach you all at once. The GSX build has to take a very temporary back seat. Call it a Rebecca Black... whatever you want... it's generating a stockpile I can't work around and front-seat passengers must take first-priority. My shelves are full of disassembled cars and it's become one of them. The main problem is that the middle of the garage... where the car should be... It's filled up with a yellow thing. A yellow thing that I love and want to finish. I hit a roadblock, but I bought the thing that lets me cut the thing out of the other thing so I can weld it in that thing. I've got it all figured out now... I had to take a break to figure it out. I went to California for a week. The Galant: This thing so far has cost me a lot of money since the last video, and those efforts have yet to fix the problem. I love the Galant, and it's getting a lot of my resources lately... but its problems take time and space to resolve. It's parts are practically as big as the car. I have nowhere to put them. The GSX: see... here I go again, I just can't stop thinking about it. I need a CLEAN garage to build the motor. The Hyundai: We learned that putting drag radials on a 102 mph Hyundai still nets you a 102 mph because it needs a clutch for all that extra traction. I need a garage to install a clutch. That's the update on my projects. I'm still working very hard on them to get all of them done, but I just have to finish what started on the Colt first... even though it takes time. What will follow immediately since I know other car people might enjoy the car things I saw on vacation... I look to these events for inspiration and they really get my creative chemistry flowing. I don't care how old something is, it just has more character. I don't care what brand it is, they all have their merits. Everything mechanical tells a story. The history of previous attempts to re-engineer the automobile are why we drive DSMs today. We're always re-engineering these things ourselves. It's important to see how other people do things, or else there's no way to learn from someone else's failures... and there's no way to measure your own success... see how to set your goals... Thank you for watching my videos, and I hope you can excuse me posting these events the way they occurred. They're all in vivid 1080HD as I was testing a Sony HXR-NX70U with a Merlin2 steadicam. I think many of you would be interested in seeing this material. DSM content is forthcoming, and will be uploaded very soon.





Driveshaft 102 - Remove Universal Joints
This is how I prefer to press out U-joints. I don't have a bearing press yet, but you don't have to have one to do this. There are many ways to do this job, and some work better than others. Each method comes with a different set of advantages and disadvantages; however, I am from the school that teaches not to beat on your driveshaft with a hammer. I've seen so many people banging and pounding on their u-joints with a hammer and to me it just doesn't make any sense. I really don't believe that's the best way to do it. Maybe they like the sound of banging on steel pipes? Maybe they hate their neighbors? Maybe they just can't shake a certain ex girlfriend from their thoughts and it brings them some relief? I say, why risk damaging the saddles and ruining the part? Why bang on a brand new universal joint with 4 sets of needle bearings in it? To save time? I refuse to beat on my driveshaft. So you're going to see a different method than the mainstream. If you can press it out, why on earth would you bang on it if you have other tools that can do a better job. Since the 2-jaw puller is needed to do other parts of this job, might as well put 'er to good use and get 'er done.





Turbo Tom's Hyundai Elantra Greddy Type-S BOV
Untuned and incomplete, low Boost, but BOV doesn't care :)





Hyundai Assembly 4 - Balancing Rods
I edited this video to its finished state, and RojoDelChocolate handed me a track with no collaboration that was the right length and rhythm. I literally did nothing to the video once the audio track was dropped in, and that's just how it went. I can't believe it. It's like when you're pumping gas into a Ford F150 full-blast and release the pump handle to stop right on $80.00 even. He's got more musical talent in his pinky fingernail than I have mechanical ability in my spleen, appendix and tonsils combined. Thank you RojoDelChocolate. Here I'm cleaning up the fly cuts, balancing the piston and rod assemblies and preparing to double-check my valve clearance. I had to start by cleaning up and re-lubricating every part that was removed to prevent contamination of the assembly. This is the tedious part of doing the job right. We learned that this whole engine assembly was pretty far-gone in previous videos, way past its service limits, so making it fit and work again takes extensive testing, machining, and re-testing to ensure all of the parts fit. This is likely the most challenging build I will perform on any car in my driveway. It has been so far. But because I have not demonstrated the basics of engine balancing beyond what a machine shop has to do to zero balance a flat-plane crankshaft, I thought I'd give it its own video right here with one of the test assemblies. When you balance rods by themselves, you balance the big-end and the pin-bore separately. You get weights of both ends of the rod using a jig and a process that I don't demonstrate in this video. The reason you do this is because the position of the weight behaves differently relative to its distance from the crankshaft pin. Weight on the big end has less of an effect than if there's extra weight on the pin bore. The best balanced engines have every part of the piston and rod assemblies balanced separately within .1 grams using the method I just described, and not the method shown in this video. The method shown here involves weighing ALL of the piston and rod assembly components together, and then taking out the difference just on the casting lines of the connecting rod. They were already off-balance and had never been balanced before. This is an improvement, not perfection. It's still something this engine needed to have done. I'm not using the big-end/small-end method here because these pistons are pressed-on and if I try to remove them from the rod, it will shatter the piston skirts. No thank you. I'm not replacing these pistons. The reason I grind down the casting lines is because it's weight is in a neutral territory, extending from the big end to the small end. It's easier to take an even amount off when you grind across the entire length of the rods. This method leaves a lot up to assumption as there's no way to determine which end of the rod is heavier, or if the weight is in a wrist pin or piston. All this does is ensure the crankshaft is spinning an even amount of weight on all 4 of its rod journals. Grams of weight turn into pounds of force at idle speeds. My goal is to remove that vibration at any and all rotations per minute if I can. So I make them all the same within 1.0 grams of their combined weight. If you're assembling and balancing all NEW parts, not parts that have worn together and need to go back in the same holes... you will have to balance the individual parts and pieces. This is the poor man's method. Even with the new parts you still do the poor man's method once you're done balancing the individual parts and assemble them, but sometimes when you're lucky with the new parts, you can just swap around the rods, pins and fasteners to balance the weights on each assembly and not have to grind anything at all. That's awfully nice when that happens. You know the Hyundai won't let me get away with that. Removing stress risers might help strengthen the rods, but it's not what I'm after here or else I would have removed the whole casting line from all of them. These rods should be fine for my goals. My goal is to remove just enough from all of the fatter rods (weight wise) to match the lightest one. Balancing an inline 4 engine with a flat-plane crank is easy if you have already balanced the crankshaft. This crank was already balanced for the GSX motor on a previous occasion. It's zero'd out. In order to balance the rotating assembly, all you do is make the piston and rod assemblies weigh identically to its neighbors. Just 3 grams of weight can produce over a hundred pounds of lateral forces at red-line so this is an aspect of engine building that you should not overlook. All you need to do is get all of them within 1 gram. The scale I'm using measures whole grams, so that's all I can do anyway. This method is acceptable for balancing a rotating assembly as long as you're smart about how to remove the weight.





CRANKWALKED? 7-bolt teardown 1080HD
Now this is a story all about how My bearings got flipped-turned upside down And I'd like to take a minute just sit right there And tell you how I used to mix and burn my gas and my air. In RVA suburbs born and raised On the dragstrip is where I spent most of my days Chillin out, maxin, relaxing all cool, 'n all shooting some BS outside with my tools When a couple of guys who were up to no good Started running races in my neighborhood I heard one little knock and my rods got scared And said "You put it in the garage until you figure out where..." I Begged and pleaded that it not be that way, But it didn't want to start and run another day. I kissed it goodbye, because the motor punched its ticket I got out my camera, said "I might as well kick it." Crankwalk yo this is bad Drinking metal shavings from an oil pan. Is this what the rumor of crankwalk is like? Hmm this won't be alright But wait I heard knocking, grinding and all that Is this the type of failure that should happen to this cool cat? I don't think so, I'll see when I get there I hope they're prepared for this video I share. Well I pulled all the bolts and when I came out There were chunks in my fluids in the pan and they drained out I aint all depressed cause I seen this before. I got my books and my wrench and we'll do it once more. I sprang into action like lightning disassembled I whistled while I worked and my hands never trembled If anything you could say that this bling is rare, and when I saw what broke I stained my underwear. I turned off the air compressor 'bout 7 or 8 And I yelled to crankcase "Yo holmes, smell ya later" I looked at my internals they were finally there To sit on my workbench and stink up the air. Audio track by RojoDelChocolate. Here's the 48,000 mile-old 7-bolt I blew up summer 2011 after over 150 drag passes, a half dozen Dyno sessions, 4 transmissions, 3 clutches and 10 years of hard all-weather use.





Hilariously Cheap 12-Cylinder Beater Cars -- /ROAD TESTAMENT
Can a used 12-cylinder car be a better value than a far more sensible four-cylinder one? Absolutely not. But at these prices, how can you afford NOT to get the 12?




Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?





Similar 1/4 mile timeslips to browse:

1994 Hyundai Elantra GT42 Turbo: 12.201 @ 123.030
Rick Inacio, Engine: 4g63, Turbos: GT42 Tires: M/T 26


1992 Hyundai Elantra : 12.960 @ 108.420
Doug Elfman, Engine: 4g63, Supercharger: no Turbos: 14b Tires: mt street slicks


2002 Hyundai Elantra GT: 14.965 @ 96.247
Steve, Engine: 2.0l DOHC, Supercharger: na Turbos: na Tires: hankook


2003 Hyundai Elantra GLS: 15.510 @ 89.640
FordFasteRR, Engine: 2.0L Twin Cam, Tires: Yokohama AVS ES-100


2011 Hyundai Elantra Limited: 16.910 @ 84.110
ET, Engine: Dohc 16v - valve inline 4: 148 horsepower, Tires: Continental ContiProContact 215/45R-17 87H


1999 Hyundai Elantra GL: 17.343 @ 80.920
Paul,


 


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