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Jamie's Boosted Hyundai Elantra (Oct '11)

This is an old video that I've decided to post practically un-edited. A few parts were skipped regarding off-topic babble in order to keep it under 10 minutes. You've seen this car in another video. There really is no way to determine how many different cars contributed to this build. Every last part on it (except the one featured in this video) was previously used on another vehicle. Absolutely nothing came new in a box. The owner put enough 4g63's together in a lifetime to have extra gaskets and seals laying around to exclusively use junkyard parts to build a whole car. In the last video, you saw me contribute all the turbo parts to this build. Used 150,000 mile old stock DSM turbo parts including a worked 14b. I'm happy to show it to you all put together. Check the other video of this car if you want more details on the engine build. None of the internals have changed.


 


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Cylinder Head 204 - Porting & Polishing
This is a first-generation 1992 1.6L Hyundai Elantra small-combustion-chamber head. Thats what it is. It's a J1 engine's cylinder head. In Cylinder Head 106 I talked about the mainstream porting theories as they are discussed. We looked at a cylinder head that I have thousands of dollars of professional work performed on, and a bone-stock second-generation head that I didn't port. In this video I just might do something you haven't seen done before. For some, that may be uncomfortable. The port and polish job I perform here is what I think will work best for my current build. This is not an extreme killer port job. What will be different here is where port textures are concerned, I will be following the advice of a reputable source that will remain un-named. You're free to port yours differently than I do in this video, and I give you that out, around the 20 minute marker. The Hyundai is far from being an ultimate-performance build. It's a $400 box of scraps with nothing but time invested. It's perfect for this video. My finished product WILL be an improvement over what I had. I don't yet have access to a flow bench. I still have an achievement to un-lock. As far as you should be concerned with the techniques I employ... without flow numbers there is no evidence of what this will do, but we will gather lots of info from dynp sessions and drag strip time slips. If I could test it on a flow bench, I would. There are MANY, and when I say many, I mean thousands of flame war mongering pirates floating around on rough seas with a hair trigger cannon finger itching to fire if you port a head any differently than what the herd mentality says to do while porting a cylinder head. I cover the herd mentality because it has merit. It's been tested. Tried and true. But I don't follow it to the letter of the law. I'm definitely not here to de-bunk it. I would port a cylinder head differently for each build based on how that engine was used. There's an extremely valid reason why relating to air speed. It's not the texture of a port that maximizes the effect of fuel atomization, but the velocity of the air running through an x or y sized valve. The driving factor in this is the piston speed. I'm not going to give you the technical information, but will refer you to information about the Lovell factor. There's a better description of this in the links below, and even a calculator to help you find your engine's sweet spot. Why the Lovell factor is important: https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/3346/the-effect-of-valve-size Lovell gas factor calculator: http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/lovellgascalc.html Only people who have flow testing equipment know for sure what really works and have the capability to produce a perfectly-matched port job for the ultimate performance build. Those guys know the definition of ultimate, and THEY are floating below the water Aegis-class submarines ready to blow your comment up if you don't know what you're talking about. They don't care if you're an armchair mechanic or a herd of pirates. I will say, they're zoomed in pretty close on me right now, and I'm expecting to take a few hits. My work will be tested based on Dyno and drag strip performance, and the results will be posted here. Fortunately, those kinds of videos are a WHOLE LOT EASIER TO MAKE!!!





DIY Parts Washer
IF you have access to compressed air, you can clean, degrease and restore the finish on automotive parts (and anything else really, not just DSMs) using the simple, inexpensive tools and supplies I demonstrate in this video. AUDIO TRACK BY: ROJODELCHOCOLATE* Some things don't fit in a parts washer. Sometimes you can't remove them from a vehicle. Sometimes you need to bring your parts washer to your project instead of the other way around. This INEXPENSIVE method for parts cleaning solves all of those problems. Caked-on grease, grime, carbon and oil are no match against this simple solution. For between $6 and $30 you can purchase a siphon-feed blow gun... spray gun... whatever you want to call it. NAPA sells an American made unit that's more expensive (like I used here) that occasionally suffer from quality control issues, and Harbor Freight sells one for $6 that I have no experience with. The tool is so simple that I can't see why it would work any differently. Mineral spirits (coal oil) is a highly-refined petroleum-based, low-odor, low-volatility solvent that can be used for many purposes from thinning paint to serving as thread cutting oil. Automotive professionals found that it actually lifts oil out of metal. This makes it an ideal choice for engine parts cleaning. Because most fluids in your car are petroleum-based, it's the ideal thinner to cut through the grease and wash away the funk. It has a much higher flash point than other solvents that are effective at cleaning up grease and oil. It's very similar to Kerosene. No special breathing aparatus is required. Gloves and googles are recommended. Because of its rapid evaporation, only minor preparations need to be made to your workspace to deal with the run-off. Vaporized mineral spirits evaporate completely just a few feet away from the blow gun, and drippings evaporate leaving only what washed off of your parts behind. If cleaning requires the use of brushes to break up soiled areas, use brushes that are appropriate for the materials you're cleaning. All in all, this solution costs about $10 for tools, and about $15 a gallon for mineral spirits. NO auto parts store solution like degreasers, or stinky, hazardous, toxic chemicals like brake cleaner will deliver these results. If you do this once, you'll be spoiled rotten. You will keep coming back to this mobile parts washer again and again whenever you need to degrease something. It's that good. Machine shops will clean your parts for you. You can do this without leaving your garage. Bring your own air compressor, and the bigger the better because of recovery time... but the siphon action isn't physically complicated, and anything from a pancake air compressor on-up will work. Oh... one more thing... Oil the &$^% out of cast iron parts when you're done. When stripped of oil, they will rust nearly instantly on contact with water or acids from your skin. Oil them. Soak them in clean oil afterwards. Tools you'll need... Siphon-feed blow gun: http://www.sears.com/shc/s/t_10153_12605?tName=air-siphon-gun.html http://www.thefind.com/hardware/info-blow-gun-siphon-sprayer ***** In the UK, Mineral Spirits are called White Spirits. ***** In China, White Spirits is pronounced "bok WHY?" with emphasis on why. Literally translated, that's "white ghost". It also means "egg" but I believe it's said a little differently. ba kwai is a derogatory slang term that Chinese use to describe white people. I'm not kidding. Either way, being called an egg might possibly bother a white person somewhere? Perhaps this is why I forgot to mention it in the video? It's too funny of a fact to leave out of the description. So, go make breakfast and have fun with your cheap, racist parts washer... no matter what color skin you're wrapped in. Mineral Spirits can be bought at your local hardware store. Mineral Spirits MSDS sheet (for the stuff I used in the video): http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=brands&id =16025013 Paint trays, wire brushes, and empty paint cans are also available at your local hardware store. I found that a 1 quart can with the lid cut off is the perfect size for cleaning pistons. Yes, you did see me bust out the Farberware can opener in my garage. A garage is simply a man's kitchen, so I see nothing wrong with this. Of course, it can be a woman's kitchen too... it just needs appliances that are appropriate for use near flammable liquids IF I'm going to be preparing any food while she fixes my car. I would never change my car's oil in a kitchen, though. I also wouldn't use cookware to catch automotive fluids. Just sayin'. * The man made me an 18 minute song in a day. Maybe some of you write music? Words can't describe how grateful I am to receive a quarter of an album from somebody on such short notice, or to explain my gratitude for his contribution.





Jafro's Hyundai Elantra Surprise
There are some things you can't put a price on. I'm not just talking about the Hyundai. I'm talking about Jamie. I have the best friends in the world. Look what Jamie just did for all of your entertainment. He literally donated it to me to play with on this channel. This isn't just for me. Think about it. It's the only FWD DSM in my driveway, and the only one I'm likely to have. With this combination of parts, I could not have a greater challenge making this car stick. Because right now it doesn't at all. Torque steer ends at about 5700 RPMs in third gear. Boost is instantaneous. This car could never make good use of any larger of a turbo. I'm convinced with the right combo of tricks to gain timing and tweaks to make it stick, and that it will run deep into the 12's just like it is. This car is a kick in the pants to drive. A rolling burnout. Be careful with that downshift.





Why so SIRIUS? Kia 4g64?
This video assumes you're aware that various iterations of the 4g series Mitsubishi engines are designated as Sirius I & II. For detailed information about which engines qualify as which, visit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitsubishi_Sirius_engine There's also this at EvolutionM: http://forums.evolutionm.net/evo-engine-turbo-drivetrain/278462-official-hyundai-2-4l-g4js -4g64-thread.html Good luck finding info about this using Hyundai and Kia in searches. Wikipedia doesn't have any info about it grouped with the Sonatas either. There is no question what this is, well illustrated in this video. I apologize for the length of this video, but a lot of ground is covered in a short time. Hopefully there's some information in here you may someday use. I'm just trying to expose it because there doesn't seem to be any real information floating around in the forums about this yet. The car is a first-generation 1999-2005 Kia Optima sedan. It has the EVO equivalent of a 4g64 2.4L. Before using any of these parts, do your research, cross-reference your parts and know what you're getting into. Using parts from this rotating assembly in a 2g Eclipse will require aftermarket rods and/or custom pistons. This is information for those who wish to frankenstein their builds, or save a buck... whichever.... either one of those requires skill.





Cylinder Head 205 - Degree 4g63 Camshafts
This video is all about establishing your valve timing baseline, and adjusting your camshafts to the manufacturer's spec. It's only ONE of several steps that should be performed when you're assembling your engine on an engine stand. Establishing these conditions with accuracy while your engine installed in the car is a near-impossibility, and the reason why... is demonstrated in this video. There are several challenges to overcome when performing these procedures on a 4gxx series Mitsubishi engine, and they're all defeated here. The cylinder head used in this video is a J1 spec '92 Hyundai Elantra small-combustion chamber head which has had several valve jobs and has been resurfaced multiple times by budget engine remanufacturers who didn't care about quality control, as well as performance shops who do. It has had no less than .040" removed from the head gasket surface, the valves are recessed because of all the valve jobs performed, and at some point when it was cut, it wasn't level. Removing material from the deck surface will change the installed camshaft centerline, and that will change your engine's valve timing events even if all other parts remain the same. I would claim this is a multi-part video except that I've got the videos broken up by topic already, and this one is all about setting your cams to the manufacturer's specification. It is not the end of testing that will be performed with these tools. The basics concerning the process and tool fabrication are covered here. Further discussion on this topic concerning the effects of advancing or retarding camshafts from spec, and for checking your valve clearance will be in the videos that follow. I had to end this video after the manufacturer's spec was achieved to make it easier to digest, and because it would have created a video greater than one hour in length despite the break-neck speeds that things happen here on Jafromobile. Where your cams are set determine how the swept volume of the combustion chamber gets used. The information on the manufacturer's spec sheet is their recommendation for baseline settings that will help you get the most out of those camshafts. Whether or not your engine can operate with those specifications without additional hardware or without causing a catastrophic failure will be expanded upon in Cylinder Head 206. The next video should be used as a companion to this video because establishing the manufacturer's baseline is not the end of the assembly or testing process. It's only half the battle. Should you be lucky enough to find your combination of parts allow your camshafts to fit and requires no additional adjustment after assembly, the steps in this video and in Cylinder Head 206 should still be performed if you are doing the assembly yourself. Failure to inspect these variables may lead to a tuning nightmare once the engine is back in the car, hard starts, or worse... bent valves and damaged wrist pins. Making these tools and performing these steps will give you the peace of mind to know with certainty that your engine is operating safely at its peak performance.





Hyundai 4g63 Assembly Part 2
Continued progress on the Hyundai build. I've covered most of this before in detail, so I'll save you the fancy narrative. The torque settings are in both the info below, and the video shown on the wrench. You will see this process again here, and each time new aspects of assembly tools and materials will be used. SPECIAL THANKS TO ROJODELCHOCOLATE for the audio track. Oil Pan Bolts 18 7 M6 x12 5'lbs MD012109 2 7 M6 x8 5'lbs MD167134 (some cars use 10mm shorties but 8mm will work) 1g Front Case Bolts qty/GR/DIA/length/torque/part# 4 7 M8 x20 17'lbs MF140225 1 7 M8 x25 17'lbs MF140227 1 7 M8 x40 17'lbs MF140233 1 4 M10 x30 22'lbs MF140062 (6-bolt) 1 7 M8 x40 17'lbs MF140233 (7-bolt) 1g oil pump housing bolts 5 4 M8 x20 12'lbs MF140025 (4qty for 7-bolt and add 1 MD141302 screw) 1 10 M8 x16 27'lbs MD040758 (Balance/Stub shaft bolt) Oil Pump Sprocket Nut 1 11 M10 x 40'lbs MD095237 *use Loctite 1g oil filter housing bolts (that I used w/6-bolt water-cooled OFH) 2 7 M8 x40 14'lbs MF241261 1 7 M8 x20 14'lbs MF140225 1 7 M8 x55 14'lbs MF241264 1 7 M8 x65 14'lbs MF241266 1g Rear Main Seal Housing Bolts 5 7 M6 x16 10'lbs MF140205 (6-bolt) 5 7 M6 x14 10'lbs MF140204 (7-bolt) 1g Timing Tesnsioner Bolts 2 7 M8 x51 17'lbs MD129350 (6-bolt) 2 7 M8 x55 17'lbs MD190987 (7-bolt) 1g Timing Tensioner Arm Bolt 1 8 M8 x16 16'lbs MF241251 Bolt 1 x x x x MD129421 Washer Flywheel bolts 6 11 M12 x22.5 98'lbs MD040557* (ALL Manual transmission 6-bolt cars) 7 11 M12 x21.5 98'lbs MD302074 (ALL Manual transmission 7-bolt turbos) * Part substitution # 2795A956 Crank Sprocket Bolt & Washer 1 11 M14 x40 87'LBS MD074255 CRANKSHAFT CENTER BOLT 1 x M14 x14.5 MD012455 CRANKSHAFT WASHER For gasket, seal and service parts information, please refer to my 6-bolt 4g63 shortblock rebuild parts video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ofWnFXkix3w For timing belt service parts information and tools, please refer to my 4g63 Timing Belt Parts video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BN7TOVrkUNQ In 29 and 3/4 minutes I offer a detailed explanation of how to do a 6-bolt AND 7-Bolt 4g63 Front Case & Oil Pump Rebuild: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPhyazI1fYc For 33 minutes I cover every oil filter housing including servicing information, rebuilding, modifying the oil filter housing, and the unabridged description of how oil pressure works in my 4g63 Oil Filter Housings video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X88tw1UFs_M





New Year's Eve Hyundai Teardown
It goes like this. One of the best friends I've ever had built this car from junk parts. He said it best, "it was built from literally a box of scraps". It ran an 13.2 in the quarter mile using no aftermarket performance parts of any kind. That quarter mile time was limited by traction. I know this car had more in it, but I never managed to get it to stick before encountering this. More on this build... The proper bolts were not always available, but the builder knows isht from Shinola. Even though this engine defies all engineering logic from Mitsubishi, the builder knew what would work and what would not. Budget was of the most primary of his concerns, and it shows at every turn, and it's what brought us to the kind of failure we find in this video. I asked him what bearings he used. He said, "...the least expensive ones I could find. Picture Aluglides. Now picture generic Aluglides. I paid half-as-much for those bearings as I would for generic Aluglides. Bolt too long? Put a nut on it and shorten it. Oil pan too close to the pickup? Hammer a big dent in it to make clearance for it. Wrong water pipe? Put a brass hardware store tee in the line to tap a turbo coolant feed. Forget buying ARP's, this is an all-standard re-used factory fastenere'd no-oil-squirter .030"-overbore 6-bolt with the cut-off balance shaft mod. It's using a small combustion chamber head off of a 1.6L Mirage with a 2.0L non-turbo block. The plug wires are used. The radiator hoses were used. Everything but the head gasket came from a junk car. The FWD turbo gearbox is from my 150,000 mile old Plymouth Laser that donated the block to the Colt. This is one of the most amusing cars I've ever wrapped my fingers around because of these kinds of character-building attributes. Nevermind that the chassis has less than 70,000 miles on it (not bad for a '92), it's just that it's built without using any new parts. Parts were substituted when they were not available, and it's ridiculously powerful. Thank you Jamie. You discovered your answer. I'm happy to help. I'll be changing some things like the oil pan bolts, bearing quality, some of the plumbing and fixing a few wiring harness problems, but I'm not changing anything else if I can avoid it. This car was never intended to have anything upgraded to deliver raw power, and I'll do my best to keep it that way, replacing and restoring what failed so that we can keep pushing these generic non-turbo .030" over pistons to the limit. Apparently, 24 PSI from a 14b is not enough. In the meantime, my diagnosis is that excessive oil pressure lead to the breakdown of the #1 bearing. After all, it's the 1st bearing in-line in the oil system on the main gallery. It's the most isolated from clutch harmonics, yet it was the one that spun. The #1 bearing supplies the oil pump. The teardrop on the head is nearly gone from head resurfacing, and this is a no-balance-shaft no-oil-squirter block. I think high oil pressure is why it falls on its face above 6000 rpms. There's a restriction upstream from the lifters and they deflate at high RPMs, losing lift. I'll fix it. I've got the parts.





Out with the old, in with the new.
I bet you were expecting a different car. Sorry. I didn't want to, nor did I ask to troll you with this video. It's just what it is. I set out to burn some rubber, drop some bass, and have some fun in the Hyundai... and this is what happened. Testing in this video... aside from the opening scene, I shot this video at 1080p30 using an head-mounted Sony HDR-AS30V Action Cam. The camera was contained in the incuded waterproof case because I needed to test the audio with it. It sounds great with out it. It sounds only good with it. This is a test to see how I can adjust my shooting style to add 1st-person perspective to my videos for everyone's benefit. The follow-up video will be shot entirely with the "big camera" (Canon XH-A1s)





Calculate Your Compression Ratio
This is everything you need to do to calculate your compression ratio. No foolin'. Every equation and process demonstrated. Find all your variables. Know your exact compression ratio in every cylinder. This is how you do it. Just because your service manual says your car is 7.8:1 or 8.5:1 compression doesn't mean that it is. Whenever there are casting irregularities, variations in piston height, parts that have been machined, non-OE parts, or changes to your head gasket selection, your compression ratio WILL change. It's highly probable that you're only CLOSE to spec if you've never touched your engine at all since it was "born", and that it doesn't MATCH spec. Even if it did, how would you know? This. 5 variables. V1 Swept Volume V2 Deck Volume V3 Piston-to-deck clearance V4 Piston dish cc's V5 Head combustion chamber cc's The ratio math: V1+V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at BDC V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at TDC The ratio is... (V1+V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) : (V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) or BDC ÷ TDC : TDC ÷ TDC First you fill in the variables, then you calculate volumes, then you add the volumes, then you reduce the ratio (fraction). It's that easy. Here are your magic numbers: 0.7854 = Pi quartered to the ten thousandth 16.387 = number of cc's in a cubic inch. If you divide any number in cc's by 16.387 it gives you inches. If you multiply any number in cubic inches by 16.387 it gives you cc's. Quartering pi lets you use the calculation: BORE x BORE x STROKE x .7854 = volume of a cylinder instead of... π x (BORE ÷ 2) x (BORE ÷ 2) x STROKE = volume of a cylinder Either way is right. You get the same result if you calculate pi to the ten thousandth. While I apologize for all the math, no I don't. I'm really not sorry. You actually clicked here for it whether you realize it or not. This is ALL the math, the tests, and the whole process to calculate your cylinder volumes and compression individually even if you don't know any of your variables yet. All of my numbers are present for those who want to calculate out the last 3 cylinders out of curiosity just to see how it affects cylinder volumes and compression ratios from one cylinder to the next. Why would I do that for you? Why would I deprive you of that practice? Just assume that all 4 of my combustion chambers are 41.75 ml if you do this. Clicking like share and subscribe helps a channel grow. It also motivates me. Don't sweat the camera. It's enough to know that so many of you care about what I'm doing here. From the bottom of my atmospheric dump, I thank you all! This gift horse's teeth are all over the place, but he sometimes poops gold nuggets. PS: Use ATF for your piston dish volume tests, not alcohol. Of course it's better just to use the spec sheet included with your pistons... but not everyone gets that luxury. Water is just fine for head combustion chamber tests. Dry and re-oil all parts that water touches.





Hyundai 4g63 Assembly Part 3
I have bad news. The big camera's playback heads bit the dust from extensive prolonged use. I wore out the tape drive. No manner of cleaning tapes can fix what it's been through. I've talked many times about how much footage goes into one of my 15 to 30 minute videos, and for every hour of video footage I've shot, the camera does double-duty because after shooting, it has to be played back in real time during capture. I've done more than 130 videos this way, probably over 2000 hours of use in the harshest of environments, and it just couldn't handle it any longer. I shot several more tapes beyond what's in this video that I can't even import because the play heads failed. I don't know if any of that video even stuck to the tapes? The lost footage from the last video was an early and un-recognized sign of what was soon to come. I know I joked about it, but in reality it's really not very funny at all. I can't afford a backup for a piece of equipment like this, so it's something I don't have. As bad as this news might feel to you, I feel it 21,000 times over and I mean that. This couldn't come at a worse time and expense for me, and at a point where my production was really starting to wrap up on this project to move on to bigger and better things. It's the only camera I have that can do what I do here on this channel, so I'm forced to stop production for now. Even though my camera is huge, 7 year old HDV technology, these things still sell for several thousand dollars used because they record un-compressed video unlike every other flash storage based solution available at twice the price. 3CCD 1080/60i HD cameras that shoot to tape have advantages that you can't affordably achieve with solid-state media. I have to use un-compressed footage to do what I do here or else there's nothing left of the video quality after 7 exports and a final mpeg compression. The Sony Action Cam can't do it, we learned that in a previous test video. Even if it could, it can't do close-ups and everything's fisheyed. Buying a low-end 4K camera is impractical because I can't efficiently or effectively edit that video without a $9,000 computer. Jafromobile is just not that big of a channel, and I do this completely un-sponsored and at my own expense with the help of a handful of friends who volunteer their talent, time and information. It's the epitome of low-budget and what it earns still doesn't come close covering the channel's equipment and expenses as they occur. People have urged that I do a kickstarter, but I can't bring myself to ask for that from the community. I don't sell a product or offer services so there is no profit margin. I can't accept money for something that happens only at the speed of my available resources. To me, this channel is my proverbial gift horse to all of you. http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/don't_look_a_gift_horse_in_the_mouth I know what you're thinking and I realize this is a grim conclusion to this video. It sounds like I'm down for the count, but don't rush to the down vote button just yet. As of the upload date of this video, I'm paying out of pocket to fix a ridiculously expensive 3CCD 1080HD broadcast quality video camera so that these projects can resume, and so that I can bring the final assembly steps to you in the same quality you've grown used to seeing here on Jafromobile. If I wear out a camera every 3 years, then so be it. This is love, and no expense is too great. The big camera is being fixed by its manufacturer, and I'm expecting the repair to cost as much as replacing it. I sincerely hope that's not the case. Hopefully my production only has to take a short break. Once production resumes and I can import these tapes, I've got some really awesome stuff coming up and I hope every last one of you is here to see it. I may have a few other backlogged nuggets I can upload, and as always I'm happy to discuss this in the comments and provide updates on the repair as I get them. Update: Awaiting quote due by 5/16 according to the repair agreement. 5/9/2014 9:17:00 AM DELIVERED NEWPORT NEWS, VA US 5/9/2014 5:36:00 AM DESTINATION SCAN NEWPORT NEWS, VA US 5/9/2014 12:04:00 AM ARRIVAL SCAN NEWPORT NEWS, VA US 5/12/2014 - Repair paid in full $440. Far less than I was expecting. I'm glad they still make parts for 7 year old professional equipment. Thank You Canon, USA! Repair should be complete within 7 business days from receipt of payment. The quote only took them 24 hours and they quoted a week just for the estimate, so at this rate I should be back up and running once again very soon. Thank ALL of you for your kind words, HUGE generosity, and all of the moral support. I swear I have the best subscribers on YouTube!





Hyundai Elantra - 2014
En este video os hago una review en profundidad del "Hyundai Elantra FL MY14 MPI Techno" de 2014. Interiores, exterior, sonido del motor, ... Año de fabricación: 2014 Cilindrada: 1.600 cc Potencia: 132 cv ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ► Canales / Channels: General: http://www.Youtube.com/Christophersc88 Motor: http://www.Youtube.com/CSCondeMotor ► Suscríbete! / Subscribe!: General: http://bit.ly/1jHWcwE Motor: http://bit.ly/1lqNCFC ► Puedes seguirme en / You can follow me on: Web: http://www.CSConde.com Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/CSCondeWeb Facebook: http://www.Facebook.com/CSCondeWeb Mi galería de fotos: http://www.Flickr.com/ChristopherSC88 ► Apps de los canales / Apps of the Channels: Youtube general: http://myapp.wips.com/csconde-extension Youtube de Motor: http://myapp.wips.com/cscondemotor-extension





How To Turbo Your Car [In 5 Minutes]
In this video, the boys from Mighty Car Mods show you in 5 minutes whats involved in turbo charging your car. For more information about each stage of the process, check out these links: Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUKgKt... Part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xt0M-B... Part 3: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8ZDL5... Keep up to date with all things MCM on Facebook here: http://www.facebook.com/mightycarmods Music is "Collide" featuring Erin Renee by Moog [WHITECITYLIGHT REMIX] http://www.mightycarmods.com/collecti... iTunes Version here: https://itunes.apple.com/au/album/col... Also something to note around Mighty Car Mods: we are normal guys and are not trained mechanics. We like to make interesting car mods and show you how we've gone about it, but we can't promise that anything we show you will work for your particular car, or that you won't harm yourself, someone else, your car or your warranty doing it. Please be safe, be responsible and unless you know what you're doing, do not fool around with very serious machinery just because you've seen us make it look so easy. Talk to a qualified mechanic if you are in any doubt.





how to paint a valve cover red (2)
painting an acura valve cover red. type r valve cover replica





WORLDS FASTEST AWD / 4G63 DATSUN / 20B RX7 IN TESTING
Willowbank Raceway held the 1st of the 2012 Top Sportman Series on the weekend. Reece McGregor and the Heat Treatments Skyline thought it would be a good chance to have some test runs in their worlds fastest RB26 powered 4wd skyline. The team worked hard all day and were rewarded with a final pass or 7.64, not far off their 7.56 record, although something tells me theres plenty more to come from this car again. Another car using the test lane was Rob Novak in his Jett Racing 4G63 powered Datsun 1200. The team made adjustments through the day and saw a PB 7.35 @ 187mph on the second last pass of the night, the final wild pass on video then saw a transmission failure but a happy team none the less. Final team testing was the Direct Clutch/Promodz Rx7, the car is 3/4 chassis and a running 3rotor 20BT tweaked by Mazfix. The team recently made adjustments in the rear and also in transmission and are starting to see results, it ran a 7.99 @ 171mph through the day, then later in the night suffered a leaking Boost pipe. Owners Jerry and Dan tell me they havent even started to push the motor yet, so another car with plenty more to come, and im sure that pb 7.80 will soon be slashed. These cars should all be running at the up and coming Sydney Jamboree at WSID and by the looks of things have some unfinished business they want to take care of :) www.insidedragimport.com www.willowbankraceway.com.au www.jamboree.com.au





Jafromobile Update
LOOK! The update is actually typed here in the description. The gear-head in me never stops. I took a vacation. It still doesn't stop when I do that, either. It's just who I am. I owe you all an update. This has been the longest break in uploading I've ever taken. I've never posted anything personal like this before. I probably won't leave this up for long, but several of you have sent me messages checking on me to make sure I'm okay... and this is the easiest way to reach you all at once. The GSX build has to take a very temporary back seat. Call it a Rebecca Black... whatever you want... it's generating a stockpile I can't work around and front-seat passengers must take first-priority. My shelves are full of disassembled cars and it's become one of them. The main problem is that the middle of the garage... where the car should be... It's filled up with a yellow thing. A yellow thing that I love and want to finish. I hit a roadblock, but I bought the thing that lets me cut the thing out of the other thing so I can weld it in that thing. I've got it all figured out now... I had to take a break to figure it out. I went to California for a week. The Galant: This thing so far has cost me a lot of money since the last video, and those efforts have yet to fix the problem. I love the Galant, and it's getting a lot of my resources lately... but its problems take time and space to resolve. It's parts are practically as big as the car. I have nowhere to put them. The GSX: see... here I go again, I just can't stop thinking about it. I need a CLEAN garage to build the motor. The Hyundai: We learned that putting drag radials on a 102 mph Hyundai still nets you a 102 mph because it needs a clutch for all that extra traction. I need a garage to install a clutch. That's the update on my projects. I'm still working very hard on them to get all of them done, but I just have to finish what started on the Colt first... even though it takes time. What will follow immediately since I know other car people might enjoy the car things I saw on vacation... I look to these events for inspiration and they really get my creative chemistry flowing. I don't care how old something is, it just has more character. I don't care what brand it is, they all have their merits. Everything mechanical tells a story. The history of previous attempts to re-engineer the automobile are why we drive DSMs today. We're always re-engineering these things ourselves. It's important to see how other people do things, or else there's no way to learn from someone else's failures... and there's no way to measure your own success... see how to set your goals... Thank you for watching my videos, and I hope you can excuse me posting these events the way they occurred. They're all in vivid 1080HD as I was testing a Sony HXR-NX70U with a Merlin2 steadicam. I think many of you would be interested in seeing this material. DSM content is forthcoming, and will be uploaded very soon.




Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?





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