Drag Racing 1/4 Mile times 0-60 Dyno Fast Cars Muscle Cars

Jamie's Boosted Hyundai Elantra (Oct '11)

This is an old video that I've decided to post practically un-edited. A few parts were skipped regarding off-topic babble in order to keep it under 10 minutes. You've seen this car in another video. There really is no way to determine how many different cars contributed to this build. Every last part on it (except the one featured in this video) was previously used on another vehicle. Absolutely nothing came new in a box. The owner put enough 4g63's together in a lifetime to have extra gaskets and seals laying around to exclusively use junkyard parts to build a whole car. In the last video, you saw me contribute all the turbo parts to this build. Used 150,000 mile old stock DSM turbo parts including a worked 14b. I'm happy to show it to you all put together. Check the other video of this car if you want more details on the engine build. None of the internals have changed.


 


More Videos...


Jafro's Hyundai Elantra Surprise
There are some things you can't put a price on. I'm not just talking about the Hyundai. I'm talking about Jamie. I have the best friends in the world. Look what Jamie just did for all of your entertainment. He literally donated it to me to play with on this channel. This isn't just for me. Think about it. It's the only FWD DSM in my driveway, and the only one I'm likely to have. With this combination of parts, I could not have a greater challenge making this car stick. Because right now it doesn't at all. Torque steer ends at about 5700 RPMs in third gear. Boost is instantaneous. This car could never make good use of any larger of a turbo. I'm convinced with the right combo of tricks to gain timing and tweaks to make it stick, and that it will run deep into the 12's just like it is. This car is a kick in the pants to drive. A rolling burnout. Be careful with that downshift.





Friday Night "Street" challenge.
Racing trailer queens at Richmond Dragway's so-called "street" event again. Making a few passes with the Hyundai Elantra to illustrate a point. Someone asked about timeslips recently and I wanted to show one of the types of information you can gain from examining what's on it. Information about yourself, and your car. How well you're driving it, and how well your equipment is working for you. I built it up with the current video explaining the 60' time measurement while installing compound tires. I figured that timing was appropriate since tires have everything to do with traction and acceleration. The 60' is all about maximizing acceleration over the 1st 60 feet of the track. The results of running different 60' times show up differently at the end of the track. A FWD, RWD and AWD car will exhibit different characteristics based on contact patches, weight distribution and rotating mass associated with each setup. But FWD is by far the most challenging to deal with getting up out of the hole. Mastering the launch with your car means more at the track than making all the horsepower in the world at once. Getting it down takes practice. Here's a quick guide for how to set your expectations. So if drag racing is your thing... always be convinced you could do it better, and never stop trying to get there.





New Year's Eve Hyundai Teardown
It goes like this. One of the best friends I've ever had built this car from junk parts. He said it best, "it was built from literally a box of scraps". It ran an 13.2 in the quarter mile using no aftermarket performance parts of any kind. That quarter mile time was limited by traction. I know this car had more in it, but I never managed to get it to stick before encountering this. More on this build... The proper bolts were not always available, but the builder knows isht from Shinola. Even though this engine defies all engineering logic from Mitsubishi, the builder knew what would work and what would not. Budget was of the most primary of his concerns, and it shows at every turn, and it's what brought us to the kind of failure we find in this video. I asked him what bearings he used. He said, "...the least expensive ones I could find. Picture Aluglides. Now picture generic Aluglides. I paid half-as-much for those bearings as I would for generic Aluglides. Bolt too long? Put a nut on it and shorten it. Oil pan too close to the pickup? Hammer a big dent in it to make clearance for it. Wrong water pipe? Put a brass hardware store tee in the line to tap a turbo coolant feed. Forget buying ARP's, this is an all-standard re-used factory fastenere'd no-oil-squirter .030"-overbore 6-bolt with the cut-off balance shaft mod. It's using a small combustion chamber head off of a 1.6L Mirage with a 2.0L non-turbo block. The plug wires are used. The radiator hoses were used. Everything but the head gasket came from a junk car. The FWD turbo gearbox is from my 150,000 mile old Plymouth Laser that donated the block to the Colt. This is one of the most amusing cars I've ever wrapped my fingers around because of these kinds of character-building attributes. Nevermind that the chassis has less than 70,000 miles on it (not bad for a '92), it's just that it's built without using any new parts. Parts were substituted when they were not available, and it's ridiculously powerful. Thank you Jamie. You discovered your answer. I'm happy to help. I'll be changing some things like the oil pan bolts, bearing quality, some of the plumbing and fixing a few wiring harness problems, but I'm not changing anything else if I can avoid it. This car was never intended to have anything upgraded to deliver raw power, and I'll do my best to keep it that way, replacing and restoring what failed so that we can keep pushing these generic non-turbo .030" over pistons to the limit. Apparently, 24 PSI from a 14b is not enough. In the meantime, my diagnosis is that excessive oil pressure lead to the breakdown of the #1 bearing. After all, it's the 1st bearing in-line in the oil system on the main gallery. It's the most isolated from clutch harmonics, yet it was the one that spun. The #1 bearing supplies the oil pump. The teardrop on the head is nearly gone from head resurfacing, and this is a no-balance-shaft no-oil-squirter block. I think high oil pressure is why it falls on its face above 6000 rpms. There's a restriction upstream from the lifters and they deflate at high RPMs, losing lift. I'll fix it. I've got the parts.





Why so SIRIUS? Kia 4g64?
This video assumes you're aware that various iterations of the 4g series Mitsubishi engines are designated as Sirius I & II. For detailed information about which engines qualify as which, visit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitsubishi_Sirius_engine There's also this at EvolutionM: http://forums.evolutionm.net/evo-engine-turbo-drivetrain/278462-official-hyundai-2-4l-g4js -4g64-thread.html Good luck finding info about this using Hyundai and Kia in searches. Wikipedia doesn't have any info about it grouped with the Sonatas either. There is no question what this is, well illustrated in this video. I apologize for the length of this video, but a lot of ground is covered in a short time. Hopefully there's some information in here you may someday use. I'm just trying to expose it because there doesn't seem to be any real information floating around in the forums about this yet. The car is a first-generation 1999-2005 Kia Optima sedan. It has the EVO equivalent of a 4g64 2.4L. Before using any of these parts, do your research, cross-reference your parts and know what you're getting into. Using parts from this rotating assembly in a 2g Eclipse will require aftermarket rods and/or custom pistons. This is information for those who wish to frankenstein their builds, or save a buck... whichever.... either one of those requires skill.





Mitsubishi 4G63 Honing with Torque Plate
See what a difference a torque plate makes on a Mitsubishi 4G63 block out of an Evo IX makes as John Edwards @ Costa Mesa R&D Automotiove Machine walks you through the steps. (949) 631-6376 Don't forget to 'Click' and SUBSCRIBE.





Hyundai Assembly 5 - Fighting The Valve Clearance
In previous videos I showed the 2 factors that really need to be scrutinized. Valve clearance and how you degree your camshafts. Of course we got sidetracked with plenty of other tips and tricks but I wanted to upload this video to illustrate that the process really isn't as easy as the animations, demonstrations and explanations make it look. The reasoning is sound, but the work to execute it can be very tedious. Setting up the valvetrain on this engine was very tedious. I say "was" because following this video, we can put that whole topic to bed. This is what it took. Not many people have the patience to deal with this, and I wanted to showcase here for those who are at the peak of their frustration with their builds. This kind of stuff can happen to anyone. Let my pain and suffering help you not feel so all alone. My apologies for the lack of new groundbreaking technical info. It's not a complicated task to install ARP head studs, and that was my plot twist. There are a couple of hurdles you may encounter depending on the production year of your engine, but they're well illustrated in this video. I'm not sure if their installation warrants a video all unto itself, but if you feel it does, speak up because I have 3 more engines to build. I can still do it. I just wanted to demonstrate that progress is being made on this, and despite the long breaks between uploads, a LOT is going on behind the scenes. This was 20 hours of repetitive work and I hope it's at least mildly entertaining. For me, this was the most boring video I've ever edited here because I had to re-live the same steps so many times, over and over again. I could very easily have inserted an hour of it in the wrong place and nobody would ever have known because it all looks the same. The text overlays are there only so you can be aware of what's different. A voiceover would have been pointless because the techniques illustrated are discussed ad-nauseum in the Cylinder Head 205 and 206 videos. The valve cover gasket installation process was covered in "Valve Cover Modification and Polishing", and the discussion about compression ratios is explained in "Calculate Your Compression Ratio". If you like the job the parts washer did, check out my DIY parts washer video. ;) Cylinder Head 205 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbWWCKPuZG4 Cylinder Head 206 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4s2X3VUwADA Valve Cover Modification and Polishing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NiIi9EljLSk Calculate Your Compression Ratio https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWze92nt9OU





Cylinder Head 205 - Degree DOHC Camshafts
This video is all about establishing your valve timing baseline, and adjusting your camshafts to the manufacturer's spec. It's only ONE of several steps that should be performed when you're assembling your engine on an engine stand. Establishing these conditions with accuracy while your engine installed in the car is a near-impossibility, and the reason why... is demonstrated in this video. There are several challenges to overcome when performing these procedures on a 4gxx series Mitsubishi engine, and they're all defeated here. The cylinder head used in this video is a J1 spec '92 Hyundai Elantra small-combustion chamber head which has had several valve jobs and has been resurfaced multiple times by budget engine remanufacturers who didn't care about quality control, as well as performance shops who do. It has had no less than .040" removed from the head gasket surface, the valves are recessed because of all the valve jobs performed, and at some point when it was cut, it wasn't level. Removing material from the deck surface will change the installed camshaft centerline, and that will change your engine's valve timing events even if all other parts remain the same. I would claim this is a multi-part video except that I've got the videos broken up by topic already, and this one is all about setting your cams to the manufacturer's specification. It is not the end of testing that will be performed with these tools. The basics concerning the process and tool fabrication are covered here. Further discussion on this topic concerning the effects of advancing or retarding camshafts from spec, and for checking your valve clearance will be in the videos that follow. I had to end this video after the manufacturer's spec was achieved to make it easier to digest, and because it would have created a video greater than one hour in length despite the break-neck speeds that things happen here on Jafromobile. Where your cams are set determine how the swept volume of the combustion chamber gets used. The information on the manufacturer's spec sheet is their recommendation for baseline settings that will help you get the most out of those camshafts. Whether or not your engine can operate with those specifications without additional hardware or without causing a catastrophic failure will be expanded upon in Cylinder Head 206. The next video should be used as a companion to this video because establishing the manufacturer's baseline is not the end of the assembly or testing process. It's only half the battle. Should you be lucky enough to find your combination of parts allow your camshafts to fit and requires no additional adjustment after assembly, the steps in this video and in Cylinder Head 206 should still be performed if you are doing the assembly yourself. Failure to inspect these variables may lead to a tuning nightmare once the engine is back in the car, hard starts, or worse... bent valves and damaged wrist pins. Making these tools and performing these steps will give you the peace of mind to know with certainty that your engine is operating safely at its peak performance.





Major Huge Announcement
This video is a quick update on the projects here on Jafromobile right now, as well as a tour and history lesson on my latest addition. I'm always hard at work to bring you all new material based on Mitsubishi production and partnerships from 1987-1999. Also covered are what's necessary to resurrect a car that's been sitting for many years. If it's got a 4g63, to me... it's always worth saving. My channel now has 4 Mitsubishi-powered projects in the works which should be capable of delivering tons of new material. I'd like to welcome all of you from the forums. My history with Mitsubishi began in 1997, and hasn't taken a day off since. Owning one of these has been long overdue for me, and you guys have been a wealth of knowledge that helped me along my travels. An asset to the DSM community, even though this isn't a DSM.





Death & Rebirth Of Turbo Hatch
Crashed one day while racing. and this is the car's road to recovery! i dont own the song: Pursuit of happiness By. Kid Cudi I do own all the pictures by the way! :D





Hyundai Assembly 4 - Balancing Rods
I edited this video to its finished state, and RojoDelChocolate handed me a track with no collaboration that was the right length and rhythm. I literally did nothing to the video once the audio track was dropped in, and that's just how it went. I can't believe it. It's like when you're pumping gas into a Ford F150 full-blast and release the pump handle to stop right on $80.00 even. He's got more musical talent in his pinky fingernail than I have mechanical ability in my spleen, appendix and tonsils combined. Thank you RojoDelChocolate. Here I'm cleaning up the fly cuts, balancing the piston and rod assemblies and preparing to double-check my valve clearance. I had to start by cleaning up and re-lubricating every part that was removed to prevent contamination of the assembly. This is the tedious part of doing the job right. We learned that this whole engine assembly was pretty far-gone in previous videos, way past its service limits, so making it fit and work again takes extensive testing, machining, and re-testing to ensure all of the parts fit. This is likely the most challenging build I will perform on any car in my driveway. It has been so far. But because I have not demonstrated the basics of engine balancing beyond what a machine shop has to do to zero balance a flat-plane crankshaft, I thought I'd give it its own video right here with one of the test assemblies. When you balance rods by themselves, you balance the big-end and the pin-bore separately. You get weights of both ends of the rod using a jig and a process that I don't demonstrate in this video. The reason you do this is because the position of the weight behaves differently relative to its distance from the crankshaft pin. Weight on the big end has less of an effect than if there's extra weight on the pin bore. The best balanced engines have every part of the piston and rod assemblies balanced separately within .1 grams using the method I just described, and not the method shown in this video. The method shown here involves weighing ALL of the piston and rod assembly components together, and then taking out the difference just on the casting lines of the connecting rod. They were already off-balance and had never been balanced before. This is an improvement, not perfection. It's still something this engine needed to have done. I'm not using the big-end/small-end method here because these pistons are pressed-on and if I try to remove them from the rod, it will shatter the piston skirts. No thank you. I'm not replacing these pistons. The reason I grind down the casting lines is because it's weight is in a neutral territory, extending from the big end to the small end. It's easier to take an even amount off when you grind across the entire length of the rods. This method leaves a lot up to assumption as there's no way to determine which end of the rod is heavier, or if the weight is in a wrist pin or piston. All this does is ensure the crankshaft is spinning an even amount of weight on all 4 of its rod journals. Grams of weight turn into pounds of force at idle speeds. My goal is to remove that vibration at any and all rotations per minute if I can. So I make them all the same within 1.0 grams of their combined weight. If you're assembling and balancing all NEW parts, not parts that have worn together and need to go back in the same holes... you will have to balance the individual parts and pieces. This is the poor man's method. Even with the new parts you still do the poor man's method once you're done balancing the individual parts and assemble them, but sometimes when you're lucky with the new parts, you can just swap around the rods, pins and fasteners to balance the weights on each assembly and not have to grind anything at all. That's awfully nice when that happens. You know the Hyundai won't let me get away with that. Removing stress risers might help strengthen the rods, but it's not what I'm after here or else I would have removed the whole casting line from all of them. These rods should be fine for my goals. My goal is to remove just enough from all of the fatter rods (weight wise) to match the lightest one. Balancing an inline 4 engine with a flat-plane crank is easy if you have already balanced the crankshaft. This crank was already balanced for the GSX motor on a previous occasion. It's zero'd out. In order to balance the rotating assembly, all you do is make the piston and rod assemblies weigh identically to its neighbors. Just 3 grams of weight can produce over a hundred pounds of lateral forces at red-line so this is an aspect of engine building that you should not overlook. All you need to do is get all of them within 1 gram. The scale I'm using measures whole grams, so that's all I can do anyway. This method is acceptable for balancing a rotating assembly as long as you're smart about how to remove the weight.





Cylinder Head 206 - Valve Clearance (& LSA)
This video is the companion and continuation video for Cylinder Head 205. In Cylinder Head 205 we covered the tools and technique for setting valve timing versus the factory-recommended specifications. It didn't work, thus; this video. How do I know it didn't work? Watch this video. The reason this is a companion video is because anyone changing their valve timing must also CHECK their valve clearance or risk bending valves. If I can install aftermarket cams, then I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I move cam gears on an engine that was previously running, then I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I have milled my head or block, I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. If I have installed larger valves, I have made significant changes to my valve clearance. Mitsubishi doesn't build a whole lot of wiggle room into their valvetrains. They keep the valves pretty tight to maximize performance and a 4g63 IS an interference engine. Note that if you follow the recommendations in this video and damage your valvetrain that I am not responsible. Here I demonstrate all of the techniques to ensure that damage never occurs because these tests are performed PRIOR to the engine ever starting, and prove that clearance is adequate for THE PARTS I SHOW HERE ON CAMERA. There can be components installed in other rotating assemblies that require additional clearance to be built into your valve clearance such as aluminum rods, or other alloys employed in the casting and forging of rotating assembly parts and valves. I strongly urge you to check with those manufacturers for their recommendations regarding thermal expansion, stretch, bounce rocker gap or float prior to making any adjustments, and use this video only as a documentation of my experience. In other words, it's my opinion. What works in your engine will likely be very different from mine, but the tests and the math shown here will work the same with your build. To find your intake valve clearance... Add your intake valve opening degrees (btdc) to your intake valve closing degrees (abdc) to 180°. IO + IC + 180 = DURATION DURATION ÷ 2 = LOBE CENTERLINE LOBE CENTERLINE - IO = INSTALLED INTAKE CENTERLINE To find your Exhaust valve clearance... Add your Exhaust valve opening degrees (bbdc) to your intake valve closing degrees (atdc) to 180°. EO + EC + 180 = DURATION DURATION ÷ 2 = LOBE CENTERLINE LOBE CENTERLINE - EC = INSTALLED Exhaust CENTERLINE To get your Lobe Separation Angle, ADD your INSTALLED INTAKE CENTERLINE to your INSTALLED Exhaust CENTERLINE and divide that result by 2. Intake Centerline + Exhaust Centerline ÷ 2 = LSA Tight Lobe Separation Angles * MOVE TORQUE LOWER IN THE POWER BAND * INCREASE MAXIMUM TORQUE OUTPUT * INCREASE CYLINDER PRESSURE * INCREASE CRANKING COMPRESSION * INCREASE EFFECTIVE COMPRESSION * INCREASE COMBUSTION CHAMBER SCAVENGING EFFECT * SHORTEN YOUR POWER BAND * REDUCE IDLE VACUUM! * REDUCE IDLE STABILITY * INCREASE LIKELIHOOD OF KNOCK! * INCREASE OVERLAP * DECREASE PISTON TO VALVE CLEARANCE! Wide Lobe Separation Angles * MOVE TORQUE HIGHER IN THE POWER BAND * DECREASE MAXIMUM TORQUE OUTPUT * LENGTHEN YOUR POWER BAND * DECREASE CYLINDER PRESSURE * DECREASE LIKELIHOOD OF KNOCK * DECREASE CRANKING COMPRESSION * DECREASE EFFECTIVE COMPRESSION * INCREASE IDLE VACUUM * IMPROVE IDLE STABILITY * DECREASE OVERLAP * DECREASE COMBUSTION CHAMBER SCAVENGING EFFECT * INCREASE PISTON TO VALVE CLEARANCE There's more that I want to say about Lobe Separation Angle (LSA). If you're tuning a DOHC engine with cam gears, you're very lucky to go through all this trouble. The pushrod and SOHC crowd can't change their lobe separation angles without replacing their camshaft, and on many engines that means removing the cylinder heads. On a 4g63 with adjustable gears, you loosen the lock bolts, turn, lock it back down and you've adjusted your LSA. This is a luxury which if you've never had to build a SOHC or a pushrod engine and install camshafts that you take for granted. DOHC tuning permits the ability to alter the opening and closing events of the valves independently of one another and perfect the valve timing during tuning without having to completely remove and replace the valvetrain. What this also means is that the pushrod crowd needs to know and understand a lot more about their camshaft profiles prior to making their purchase as we [the DOHC crowd] do. They have to be on their A-game when they drop the coin on a new cam or else things get expensive really quick. Lobe separation angle says more about how camshafts behave than duration and lift, but all 3 should be carefully scrutinized when you're making that determination. Yes, I did actually animate my engine's valve timing exactly the way HKS said to set it up. Yes those are all actual photos of my parts. Yes that was the biggest Photoshop file I've ever created.





Jafromobile Update
LOOK! The update is actually typed here in the description. The gear-head in me never stops. I took a vacation. It still doesn't stop when I do that, either. It's just who I am. I owe you all an update. This has been the longest break in uploading I've ever taken. I've never posted anything personal like this before. I probably won't leave this up for long, but several of you have sent me messages checking on me to make sure I'm okay... and this is the easiest way to reach you all at once. The GSX build has to take a very temporary back seat. Call it a Rebecca Black... whatever you want... it's generating a stockpile I can't work around and front-seat passengers must take first-priority. My shelves are full of disassembled cars and it's become one of them. The main problem is that the middle of the garage... where the car should be... It's filled up with a yellow thing. A yellow thing that I love and want to finish. I hit a roadblock, but I bought the thing that lets me cut the thing out of the other thing so I can weld it in that thing. I've got it all figured out now... I had to take a break to figure it out. I went to California for a week. The Galant: This thing so far has cost me a lot of money since the last video, and those efforts have yet to fix the problem. I love the Galant, and it's getting a lot of my resources lately... but its problems take time and space to resolve. It's parts are practically as big as the car. I have nowhere to put them. The GSX: see... here I go again, I just can't stop thinking about it. I need a CLEAN garage to build the motor. The Hyundai: We learned that putting drag radials on a 102 mph Hyundai still nets you a 102 mph because it needs a clutch for all that extra traction. I need a garage to install a clutch. That's the update on my projects. I'm still working very hard on them to get all of them done, but I just have to finish what started on the Colt first... even though it takes time. What will follow immediately since I know other car people might enjoy the car things I saw on vacation... I look to these events for inspiration and they really get my creative chemistry flowing. I don't care how old something is, it just has more character. I don't care what brand it is, they all have their merits. Everything mechanical tells a story. The history of previous attempts to re-engineer the automobile are why we drive DSMs today. We're always re-engineering these things ourselves. It's important to see how other people do things, or else there's no way to learn from someone else's failures... and there's no way to measure your own success... see how to set your goals... Thank you for watching my videos, and I hope you can excuse me posting these events the way they occurred. They're all in vivid 1080HD as I was testing a Sony HXR-NX70U with a Merlin2 steadicam. I think many of you would be interested in seeing this material. DSM content is forthcoming, and will be uploaded very soon.





Turbo Tom's Hyundai Elantra Greddy Type-S BOV
Untuned and incomplete, low Boost, but BOV doesn't care :)





Redline Review: 2014 Hyundai Elantra
A safe and solid pick in the highly competitive compact class, the refreshed 2014 Hyundai Elantra still offers buyers a strong warranty, plentiful features, and a stylish design wrapped in an affordable package. Just be sure you don't require the most technological advanced features or the sportiest driving dynamics.





how to paint a valve cover red (2)
painting an acura valve cover red. type r valve cover replica





Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?




Similar 1/4 mile timeslips to browse:

1994 Hyundai Elantra GT42 Turbo: 12.201 @ 123.030
Rick Inacio, Engine: 4g63, Turbos: GT42 Tires: M/T 26


1992 Hyundai Elantra : 12.960 @ 108.420
Doug Elfman, Engine: 4g63, Supercharger: no Turbos: 14b Tires: mt street slicks


2002 Hyundai Elantra GT: 14.965 @ 96.247
Steve, Engine: 2.0l DOHC, Supercharger: na Turbos: na Tires: hankook


2003 Hyundai Elantra GLS: 15.510 @ 89.640
FordFasteRR, Engine: 2.0L Twin Cam, Tires: Yokohama AVS ES-100


2011 Hyundai Elantra Limited: 16.910 @ 84.110
ET, Engine: Dohc 16v - valve inline 4: 148 horsepower, Tires: Continental ContiProContact 215/45R-17 87H


1999 Hyundai Elantra GL: 17.343 @ 80.920
Paul,


 


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