Ted Harbit R-2 Studebaker Lark vs Plymouth Road Runner

Ted Harbit racing a Plymouth Road Runner in a heads up pure stock race

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Studebaker US6 "Frozen In Time" (Engine Overhaul)
In the summer of 2009 this 1945 Studebaker US6 with its Hercules JXD engine was brought back to life and driven 75 miles back to civilization after being abandoned in the remote Alaskan wilderness and "frozen in time" for two decades. Now in June 2013 the old war horse is getting some much needed TLC and a new lease on life. This truck was built on May 23, 1945.

1960 Studebaker Lark Convertible Red SumtFG021613
Lark had the drop on the Falcon, Valiant and Corvair in that it hit the market as a 1959 model, one year earlier than the offerings from the "big 3"! In addition, Lark offered a stationwagon and convertible version besides the sedan! Larks continued through 1963, then underwent a name change and finally were out of production during the 1966 model year. It's really a shame..they offered a 6 and V8 and were competitive...too bad it didn't last, the company that had started by making Conestoga wagons in the previous century!

48 Studebaker Champion Motor
1948 48 Studebaker Champion Starlight Coupe - Test Drive to demonstrate engine and transmission w/ overdrive. 169 cubic inch flathead straight six cylinder with offenhauser twin carburetor intake, 3 speed trans. w/ overdrive.

1962 Studebaker Lark V8 (original) - in detail
At the time the Lark was conceived, Studebaker-Packard Corporation was under a management contract with Curtiss-Wright Aircraft Company. Studebaker-Packard had been losing money for years when company president Harold Churchill came up with the idea of abandoning the full-size car market in favor of building a new compact car that he hoped would save the company. The Lark was ingeniously designed around the core bodyshell of the full-sized 1953-1958 Studebakers. By reducing the front and rear overhangs and shortening the wheelbase, the car could still seat six people comfortably and hold a surprising amount of luggage. It was hoped that the vehicle would save America's oldest vehicle manufacturer when it was launched in the fall of 1958 as a 1959 model, much like the 1939 Studebaker Champion had saved the company in the years prior to World War II. In fact, it was the Champion which Churchill specifically took as his inspiration for the Lark. With its simple grille, minimal and tasteful use of chrome and clean lines, the Lark "flew" in the face of most of the established "longer, lower and wider" styling norms fostered by Detroit's "Big Three" automakers (General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler). Studebaker's 1957-58 Scotsman had proved the existence of a demand for a less-flashy automobile, and while the Lark was not nearly so undecorated as the Scotsman, it was unmistakably purer of line than anything Detroit would offer for 1959.