Lexus LFA races on track with IS F at Bruntingthorpe, UK

Lexus takes to the track as the UK's first full-production LFA supercar lines up with the high-performance IS F saloon at VMAX200, Bruntingthorpe Proving Ground, May 2011. For Lexus news, visit the blog: http://blog.lexus.co.uk Join us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/LexusUK Join us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/Officiallexusuk To find out more about LFA and IS F, visit http://www.lexus.co.uk.

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Lexus LFA: in-car with Google Glass at Oulton Park
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The special Lexus LS 600h L that will be used by His Serene Highness Prince Albert II of Monaco and Ms. Charlene Wittstock during their wedding day is currently being converted. The work is being carried out by expert and specialised automotive craftsmen, and will take more than 2000 hours to complete.





Lexus at Milan Design Week 2015
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How to fold an origami cat with your non-dominant hand
www.lexus.co.uk The people that work at Lexus’ factories aren't just employees. They’re craftsmen and women that take considerable pride in the standard of their work. But not all Lexus craftsmen are equal. At the top of the tree are artisans known as ‘takumi’. Their goal is simple – the pursuit of perfection in their chosen field, whether it be paintwork or welding, vehicle dynamics or interior crafting. They are responsible for keeping up the high standards Lexus demands of its vehicles. Becoming a takumi is no easy task. All takumi have at least a quarter of a century of experience, time spent honing their skills to a fine point. Several takumi have had their skills digitised and programmed into robots that recreate actions repeated thousands of times, so it’s vital that they’re up to scratch. Before becoming a takumi, candidates are assessed in a number of ways, but one is via a decidedly non-digital method – the Japanese art of paper folding, origami. Before they graduate to takumi status, candidates are challenged to fold a relatively simple origami cat. But here’s the catch – they have to fold the cat with just one hand, and in under 90 seconds. Oh, and it has to be their non-dominant hand. Challenging? To find out, we went to see Mark Bolitho. A respected name in the world of origami, Mark works full time creating paper masterworks for corporate clients, advertising and events, and is also the author of several books on the art. In short, he knows what he’s doing when it comes to folding paper.




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