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Cylinder Head 105 - Valve Job Basics

Valves not sealing? Valves not bent? This is how you fix that problem. In this video I outline the basic valve job procedure. Cleaning the valves, cleaning the seats, cleaning the combustion chamber and lapping the valves in to make a better seal. Here I cover the process start-to-finish. It's the same exact process for pretty much all non-rotary combustion engines. It takes patience and perseverance to do this job, but anyone can do it. Reference your service manual for measurements and service limits. Everything else that's not in your service manual is in this video. I apologize for not having broken busted crap to work with in this video. It's more beneficial to all of you when bad fortune falls on me because it gets well documented, and many people watching these videos are looking for answers. If you have bent valves, you will discover it quickly once you chuck one up in the drill. You'll see the face of the valve wobble around while it spins. You'll see evidence of this damage on the valve seat. If it's bad, you may see damage on the valve guides in the form of cracks or missing pieces where the valve guides protrude through the head ports. Give all that stuff a good visual inspection. ...and if you doubt yourself, never hesitate to get a second opinion or consult a machine shop. They will have access to expensive tools that you wont find in your average gearhead's garage.


 


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Hyundai Elantra 4g63 Shortblock Assembly
HOLD ON TIGHT! HERE WE GO! We begin the blueprint and assembly on my 1992 Hyundai Elantra's bastardized 4g63. The parts used in this are from a mash of different brands and models outside of the typical 2.0L 4g63, but the specs and standards I am following for its assembly are for the 2.0L DOHC. If you want to follow along in your service manual to verify what I've done here in this video, the processes we cover here detail pages 11C-95 through 11C-105 of the 1g Overhaul manual. I would prefer you not rip them from the binding and throw them away, relying only on this video for instruction... but rather use this video as a motivational guide, and as a demonstration of the techniques involved in those sections. You gotta do the cooking by the book. I never had any intention of making instructional videos on this particular car, but after it blew up I slowly realized it's actually a better case study for how a 4g63 ticks than anything else in my driveway. There are several reasons for this. One being that it's a mix of parts that shouldn't be bolted together, and the other is that many of you watching my videos aren't trying to build a 600hp engine out of aftermarket parts. You're trying to put back together what used to be your daily driver. This car covers those bases. Don't think for a second I won't go through this same trouble and level of detail for the GSX. I will. When I do, having this information in this video will give you a better understanding on how and why I do things the way I do when I get there. This was the shortest I could condense this video. I've never uploaded a video this long, and I hope I never have to do it again. It took a month to create on cutting-edge equipment, 16 hours to export, and 9 hours for YouTube to process. My script for the voiceover is 6 times longer than the whole script for the movie Pootie Tang. 6 times. Longer. Than a Hollywood movie.





Cylinder Head 204 - Porting & Polishing
This is a first-generation 1992 1.6L Hyundai Elantra small-combustion-chamber head. Thats what it is. It's a J1 engine's cylinder head. In Cylinder Head 106 I talked about the mainstream porting theories as they are discussed. We looked at a cylinder head that I have thousands of dollars of professional work performed on, and a bone-stock second-generation head that I didn't port. In this video I just might do something you haven't seen done before. For some, that may be uncomfortable. The port and polish job I perform here is what I think will work best for my current build. This is not an extreme killer port job. What will be different here is where port textures are concerned, I will be following the advice of a reputable source that will remain un-named. You're free to port yours differently than I do in this video, and I give you that out, around the 20 minute marker. The Hyundai is far from being an ultimate-performance build. It's a $400 box of scraps with nothing but time invested. It's perfect for this video. My finished product WILL be an improvement over what I had. I don't yet have access to a flow bench. I still have an achievement to un-lock. As far as you should be concerned with the techniques I employ... without flow numbers there is no evidence of what this will do, but we will gather lots of info from dynp sessions and drag strip time slips. If I could test it on a flow bench, I would. There are MANY, and when I say many, I mean thousands of flame war mongering pirates floating around on rough seas with a hair trigger cannon finger itching to fire if you port a head any differently than what the herd mentality says to do while porting a cylinder head. I cover the herd mentality because it has merit. It's been tested. Tried and true. But I don't follow it to the letter of the law. I'm definitely not here to de-bunk it. I would port a cylinder head differently for each build based on how that engine was used. There's an extremely valid reason why relating to air speed. It's not the texture of a port that maximizes the effect of fuel atomization, but the velocity of the air running through an x or y sized valve. The driving factor in this is the piston speed. I'm not going to give you the technical information, but will refer you to information about the Lovell factor. There's a better description of this in the links below, and even a calculator to help you find your engine's sweet spot. Why the Lovell factor is important: https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/3346/the-effect-of-valve-size Lovell gas factor calculator: http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/lovellgascalc.html Only people who have flow testing equipment know for sure what really works and have the capability to produce a perfectly-matched port job for the ultimate performance build. Those guys know the definition of ultimate, and THEY are floating below the water Aegis-class submarines ready to blow your comment up if you don't know what you're talking about. They don't care if you're an armchair mechanic or a herd of pirates. I will say, they're zoomed in pretty close on me right now, and I'm expecting to take a few hits. My work will be tested based on Dyno and drag strip performance, and the results will be posted here. Fortunately, those kinds of videos are a WHOLE LOT EASIER TO MAKE!!!





How To Remove and Replace Valves in a Cylinder Head -EricTheCarGuy
If you need to remove a valve from a cylinder head either to replace the valve or replace the valve seals, this video will help you do that. You can also do this process while the cylinder head is still fastened to the engine block with some tools. To do that, put the piston at TDC compression stroke and make sure both valves are closed. You can then run compressed air into the cylinder to hold the valves in place as you compress the valve springs. I often use my compression tester hose to do this. You need to remove the schrader valve first before you attempt this, if not, air will not flow into the cylinder. You can also use a piece of rope or equivalent to keep the valves from dropping into the cylinder while you work. This method works well if you're just replacing the valve seals. You won't be able to use the large spring compressor however. You'll have to use the Lisle or some other type of compressor do manage that task. Here's some useful links for you. Tools. Large Spring Compressor: http://www.jbtoolsales.com/gearwrench-383d-valve-spring-compressor/#oid=100 2_1 Lisle Spring Compressor Tool: http://www.jbtoolsales.com/lisle-36050-valve-keeper-remover-and-installer-k it/#oid=1002_1 I had a heck of a time trying to find the Honda special tool and was not able to provide a link for you. Sorry about that. The Lisle tool will work just fine, OR I've seen some home made versions of that type of extension that looked like they'd work pretty well. Related videos. Basic Parts of an Engine: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=saPGX-1qC4M Civic Engine R&R Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Me9w6aIqJ48 Tahoe Engine R&R Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aMkqWMvcdiQ Dodge Ram Engine R&R Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oc3zSgEA8Jk Sonoma Engine R&R Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ivqj2LjE28 Articles. How to Find Leaks: http://www.ericthecarguy.com/faq/finding-and-fixing-fluid-leaks Discussion about this video: http://www.ericthecarguy.com/kunena/18-The-EricTheCarGuy-Video-Forum/50319- how-to-remove-replace-valves-in-a-cylinder-head#92526 The best place for answers to your automotive questions: http://www.ericthecarguy.com EricTheCarGuy code lookup: http://www.ericthecarguy.com/obd-code-lookup Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EricTheCarGuy?fref=ts Twitter: https://twitter.com/EricTheCarGuy Google+: https://plus.google.com/100195180196698058780/posts Information on Premium Membership: https://www.ericthecarguy.com/premium-content-streaming-etcg-content Stay Dirty ETCG Due to factors beyond the control of EricTheCarGuy, it cannot guarantee against unauthorized modifications of this information, or improper use of this information.  EricTheCarGuy assumes no liability for property damage or injury incurred as a result of any of the information contained in this video. EricTheCarGuy recommends safe practices when working with power tools, automotive lifts, lifting tools, jack stands, electrical equipment, blunt instruments, chemicals, lubricants, or any other tools or equipment seen or implied in this video.  Due to factors beyond the control of EricTheCarGuy, no information contained in this video shall create any express or implied warranty or guarantee of any particular result.  Any injury, damage or loss that may result from improper use of these tools, equipment, or the information contained in this video is the sole responsibility of the user and not EricTheCarGuy.





EASY, HOW I LAPP & GRIND VALVES. THEY DONT TEACH THIS TRICK IN SCHOOL, ONLY OLDSKOOL.
Automotive technician since 1991 I show how I do a valve grinding job (Lapping Valves) at home using a vacuum hose, drill & compound, don't over think it and don't assume it cant be done. learn how and save money on your project with out taking your cylinder head to the machine shop. Valve guides must be in good shape ( with no significant play or bent Valves before you perform this task, but this procedure works very well if done with care & quality. Go get it! and God bless.





Block Preparation Part 1
Preparation for powder coating and Glyptal application. Audio track is an original performance by Rojo Del Chocolate. My block is being powder coated rather than painted. It's just something I do. The GSX had it on the last block so it's getting it again. Since the tools are so similar and the mess is the same, I'm going ahead and preparing it for the Glyptal application as well. These 2 coatings will require being baked separately. The powder coating is baked on at a hotter temperature than the Glyptal, so it's going first. The surface preparation instructions for Glyptal is as follows: Surface to be painted should be dry and free from dirt, wax, grease, rust and oil. Remove all grease and oil by washing surface with mineral spirits. Wipe or scrape off all loose dirt, rust or scale. The last sentence is what's covered in this video. The 2nd sentence happens next (although it's already degreased), and I'll get it back from powder coat with it in the state described in sentence #1 completed. If following these instructions to the letter of the law. Second and third opinions in... the main journal is fine. You'll notice that I didn't coat the main caps, or "suitcase handles". I'm not going to. You bang around on these installing and removing them, and I don't want to risk chipping them once they're coated. They're below the windage area, and there will also be an un-coated main bearing girdle down there. This video covered 25 hours of actual work. Yes, I kept changing into the same filthy clothes every shoot because I wanted it to look consistent. You have to take your time doing this kind of work, and be VERY VERY CAREFUL! If for some reason you're crazy enough to attempt what I do in this video, you do so at your own risk. This is an elective treatment that I've never done, but I am by no means the first person to do it. I'm learning about it just like the rest of you.





Engine Exterior Cleaning
Cleaning the exterior of my engine block with citrus degreaser and aluminum brush. Scrubbing away the grime can help detect oil leaks but can also make them worse. Cleaning is a double-edge sword. It's always best to bring leaks to the forefront instead of keeping them hidden by grime. My philosophy is not to hide the leaks but to detect and fix them. Adam Singer is co-creator of the music track (collaboration).





Cylinder Head 102 - Hydro Test Valves
If you noticed a drop in compression on one cylinder, and pouring a cap of oil through the spark plug holes didn't fix it, then it's likely you experienced a leaky valve or a burnt valve seat. What this test does is show you where it was leaking. Typically it takes a valve job to repair, but this can also occur on a freshly-machined head if any work was done improperly or out-of-center. I'm using tap water for the test because both cylinder heads I'm testing will receive extensive machine work and cleaning before being re-used. If you were to do this test on a freshly-machined head, you'd want to use deionized water as it contains none of the salts (sodium, chlorine, etc...) that would leave deposits and corrode metal parts.





Replacing valve stem seals in 305 H.O. small block chevy from 1986 Monte Carlo SS
I'm putting the original 305HO back in the Monte after taking the ZZ3 out for my Iroc project. This is mainly to make the car mobile but it may end up tagged with this engine for a while. Previous owner reported that this 305 has over 100k miles on it and has been out of the car since 1997. He said it smoked during startup and sure enough the valve stem seals were worn out. Hopefully this will fix the issue.





How to Reseat / Lap Valves (Basic Valve Job)
In this video i'm explaining how to reseat or lap valves in a flathead or overhead valve engine. Also can be called a valve job, but this is not a complete valve job. I also used to much valve grinding compound, it does not require a whole lot. Usually when a engine needs this done is when a engine has low compression that is found to be leaking around the valves, or sometimes a engine will backfire do to the valves not closing completely/properly. Thanks for watching.





New Year's Eve Hyundai Teardown
It goes like this. One of the best friends I've ever had built this car from junk parts. He said it best, "it was built from literally a box of scraps". It ran an 13.2 in the quarter mile using no aftermarket performance parts of any kind. That quarter mile time was limited by traction. I know this car had more in it, but I never managed to get it to stick before encountering this. More on this build... The proper bolts were not always available, but the builder knows isht from Shinola. Even though this engine defies all engineering logic from Mitsubishi, the builder knew what would work and what would not. Budget was of the most primary of his concerns, and it shows at every turn, and it's what brought us to the kind of failure we find in this video. I asked him what bearings he used. He said, "...the least expensive ones I could find. Picture Aluglides. Now picture generic Aluglides. I paid half-as-much for those bearings as I would for generic Aluglides. Bolt too long? Put a nut on it and shorten it. Oil pan too close to the pickup? Hammer a big dent in it to make clearance for it. Wrong water pipe? Put a brass hardware store tee in the line to tap a turbo coolant feed. Forget buying ARP's, this is an all-standard re-used factory fastenere'd no-oil-squirter .030"-overbore 6-bolt with the cut-off balance shaft mod. It's using a small combustion chamber head off of a 1.6L Mirage with a 2.0L non-turbo block. The plug wires are used. The radiator hoses were used. Everything but the head gasket came from a junk car. The FWD turbo gearbox is from my 150,000 mile old Plymouth Laser that donated the block to the Colt. This is one of the most amusing cars I've ever wrapped my fingers around because of these kinds of character-building attributes. Nevermind that the chassis has less than 70,000 miles on it (not bad for a '92), it's just that it's built without using any new parts. Parts were substituted when they were not available, and it's ridiculously powerful. Thank you Jamie. You discovered your answer. I'm happy to help. I'll be changing some things like the oil pan bolts, bearing quality, some of the plumbing and fixing a few wiring harness problems, but I'm not changing anything else if I can avoid it. This car was never intended to have anything upgraded to deliver raw power, and I'll do my best to keep it that way, replacing and restoring what failed so that we can keep pushing these generic non-turbo .030" over pistons to the limit. Apparently, 24 PSI from a 14b is not enough. In the meantime, my diagnosis is that excessive oil pressure lead to the breakdown of the #1 bearing. After all, it's the 1st bearing in-line in the oil system on the main gallery. It's the most isolated from clutch harmonics, yet it was the one that spun. The #1 bearing supplies the oil pump. The teardrop on the head is nearly gone from head resurfacing, and this is a no-balance-shaft no-oil-squirter block. I think high oil pressure is why it falls on its face above 6000 rpms. There's a restriction upstream from the lifters and they deflate at high RPMs, losing lift. I'll fix it. I've got the parts.





BDA Cylinder Head Repair after valve and seat damage
BDA Cylinder Head Repair by Vulcan Engineering after valve & Seat damage. www.vulcanengines.com





► Bentley Factory - W12 Engine





How To Torque Cylinder Head Bolts - EricTheCarGuy
How To Torque Cylinder Head Bolts - EricTheCarGuy http://www.ericthecarguy.com/ Well this was a fun one to make. I believe I covered everything but if you feel I haven't please let me know in the comments below as well as any tips you might have to add as well. I'm not trying to make a big deal about "pound feet" or "foot pounds" I'm just trying to put that out there, the important thing is that you get the proper torque and get the job done right in my opinion, what you decide to call it is up to you. --- Click below and Stay Dirty Visit me at EricTheCarGuy.com http://ericthecarguy.com/ Visit EricTheCarGuy Forum http://www.ericthecarguy.com/forum/default.aspx Visit my Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/EricTheCarGuy --- ETCG Due to factors beyond the control of EricTheCarGuy, it cannot guarantee against unauthorized modifications of this information, or improper use of this information.  EricTheCarGuy assumes no liability for property damage or injury incurred as a result of any of the information contained in this video. EricTheCarGuy recommends safe practices when working with power tools, automotive lifts, lifting tools, jack stands, electrical equipment, blunt instruments, chemicals, lubricants, or any other tools or equipment seen or implied in this video.  Due to factors beyond the control of EricTheCarGuy, no information contained in this video shall create any express or implied warranty or guarantee of any particular result.  Any injury, damage or loss that may result from improper use of these tools, equipment, or the information contained in this video is the sole responsibility of the user and not EricTheCarGuy.





Cylinder Head 205 - Degree 4g63 Camshafts
This video is all about establishing your valve timing baseline, and adjusting your camshafts to the manufacturer's spec. It's only ONE of several steps that should be performed when you're assembling your engine on an engine stand. Establishing these conditions with accuracy while your engine installed in the car is a near-impossibility, and the reason why... is demonstrated in this video. There are several challenges to overcome when performing these procedures on a 4gxx series Mitsubishi engine, and they're all defeated here. The cylinder head used in this video is a J1 spec '92 Hyundai Elantra small-combustion chamber head which has had several valve jobs and has been resurfaced multiple times by budget engine remanufacturers who didn't care about quality control, as well as performance shops who do. It has had no less than .040" removed from the head gasket surface, the valves are recessed because of all the valve jobs performed, and at some point when it was cut, it wasn't level. Removing material from the deck surface will change the installed camshaft centerline, and that will change your engine's valve timing events even if all other parts remain the same. I would claim this is a multi-part video except that I've got the videos broken up by topic already, and this one is all about setting your cams to the manufacturer's specification. It is not the end of testing that will be performed with these tools. The basics concerning the process and tool fabrication are covered here. Further discussion on this topic concerning the effects of advancing or retarding camshafts from spec, and for checking your valve clearance will be in the videos that follow. I had to end this video after the manufacturer's spec was achieved to make it easier to digest, and because it would have created a video greater than one hour in length despite the break-neck speeds that things happen here on Jafromobile. Where your cams are set determine how the swept volume of the combustion chamber gets used. The information on the manufacturer's spec sheet is their recommendation for baseline settings that will help you get the most out of those camshafts. Whether or not your engine can operate with those specifications without additional hardware or without causing a catastrophic failure will be expanded upon in Cylinder Head 206. The next video should be used as a companion to this video because establishing the manufacturer's baseline is not the end of the assembly or testing process. It's only half the battle. Should you be lucky enough to find your combination of parts allow your camshafts to fit and requires no additional adjustment after assembly, the steps in this video and in Cylinder Head 206 should still be performed if you are doing the assembly yourself. Failure to inspect these variables may lead to a tuning nightmare once the engine is back in the car, hard starts, or worse... bent valves and damaged wrist pins. Making these tools and performing these steps will give you the peace of mind to know with certainty that your engine is operating safely at its peak performance.





How to change Head Gasket on VW 1.9d engines
How to change timing belt on a volkswagon caddy van 1.9 standard diesel engine. Same procedure for most diesel engines. Also useful if changing timing belt, tensioner, cylinder head etc. - - - - - - - - - - - - Due to factors beyond the control of FixItSam, it cannot guarantee against unauthorized modifications of this information, or improper use of this information. FixItSam assumes no liability for property damage or injury incurred as a result of any of the information contained in this video. FixItSam recommends safe practices when working with power tools, automotive lifts, lifting tools, jack stands, electrical equipment, blunt instruments, chemicals, lubricants, or any other tools or equipment seen or implied in this video. Due to factors beyond the control of FixItSam, no information contained in this video shall create any express or implied warranty or guarantee of any particular result. Any injury, damage or loss that may result from improper use of these tools, equipment, or the information contained in this video is the sole responsibility of the user and not youtube.com/fixitsam.




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