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10 Ship Launch Gone Wrong
Ever wondered how ships are launched? Read our detailed article to find out : http://www.engineeringworldchannel.com/ship-launching-explained/ Also read 'Why tow an Iceberg?' http://www.engineeringworldchannel.com/tow-an-iceberg/ Follow us on : Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/EWC102 Pinterest : https://www.pinterest.com/EW102/ YouTube : goo.gl/v2eQ2K Watch more maritime videos on our channel : What a perfect ship launch looks like ? - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=osfrALLVP14 What happens when ship collides ? - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vD_7Mfx4C0





5 AMAZING Ship Launch Videos
Ship launching is the process of transferring a vessel to the water. It is a naval tradition in many cultures, dating back thousands of years. It has been observed as a public celebration and a solemn blessing. Ship launching imposes stresses on the ship not met during normal operation, in addition to the size and weight of the vessel, and it represents a considerable engineering challenge as well as a public spectacle. The process also involves many traditions intended to invite good luck, such as christening by breaking a sacrificial bottle of champagne over the bow as the ship is named aloud and launched. There are three principal methods of conveying a new ship from building site to water, only two of which are called "launching." The oldest, most familiar, and most widely used is the end-on launch, in which the vessel slides down an inclined slipway, usually stern first. With the side launch, the ship enters the water broadside. The third method is float-out, used for ships that are built in basins or dry docks and then floated by admitting water into the dock. In all cases, heavy chains are attached to the ship and the drag effect is used to slow the vessel once afloat, until tugboats can move the hull to a jetty for fitting out. Watch what happens when a ship collides: www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vD_7Mfx4C0 But what happens when ship launch fails? : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0GTBVRDziss Follow us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/EWC102/





Bizarre Underwater Discoveries
From amazing art to a mysterious train, these are 13 of the most bizarre underwater discoveries. Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 10. The Cancun Underwater Museum has over 500 underwater sculptures dedicated to the Art of Conservation. The unique attraction offers divers a spectacular view of the statues that can be seen from a glass bottom boat. The museum began its venture in Cancun in 2009 and was completed in 2013. Each figure was made from a PH neutral cement, coral, seaweed and algae. The reason for this is to help benefit and protect coral reefs. Coral reefs can be created from sunken ships that fall to the bottom of the ocean floor. Creating statues are used to help save the ocean by creating a new way to grow coral reefs. 9. MS Zenobia was a Swedish ferry boat that sank on her maiden voyage in 1980 near Larnaca, Cyprus. After passing through the Strait of Gibraltar in route to Athens Greece the captain began to notice problems associated with steering. Once they arrived at Larnaca, the problem occurred again and the computerized pumping system was forcing additional water into the adjacent ballast tanks because of a software error. A few days after the ferry sank and sank in Larnaca Bay. Now it is a favorite dive site for visitors in Cyprus. 8. From land, the swimming whole Angelita looks like an average swimming hole. It is located in the Yucatan in Mexico. Divers have to plunge down to nearly 100 feet underwater to see the river. The “Underwater River,” is a cenote that is just an optical illusion produced by a cloud of hydrogen sulfide intermingling with the surrounding saltwater. 7. USS Oriskany is nicknamed the “Mighty O”. Was one of the small amount of Essex-class aircraft carriers finished only after World War II for the United States Navy. The ship was called for the Battle of Oriskany through the Revolutionary War. The aircraft carrier saw years of combat through both the Korean and Viet Nam Wars before the carrier was purposely sunk to become part of the world's largest artificial coral reef. 6. Several miles off New Jersey’s coast there lie an unanticipated site below the ocean’s surface. Two trains were found in 1985 but no one knows for sure how they got there. The most excepted theory behind how the locomotives got there is that in the 1850's the trains were being transported from the place they were built to their new home which was likely a rail yard. Because the locomotives were small, they could have been pushed overboard into the sea. Now the trains give an interesting spot for divers. 5. Yonaguni Monument is located off the coast of the Ryukyu Islands, in Japan. The monument is connected to a large rock mass in the ocean and believe to have been deposited over 20 million years ago. The main monument is a rectangular formation which measures 490 by 130 ft. The rock formation is made out of moderate to very fine sandstones and mudstones. Scientist who have studied the formation have concluded that some of the features could be manmade. One scientist believes that the site could be fragments of the legendary lost continent of Mu. 4. The SS President Coolidge was an ocean liner from the U.S. The large ship saw its nautical days finish after yielding to mines near the large military base on Espiritu Santo. Now the ship is used as a dive site. Divers can see a mostly intact cruise liner and a military ship. They can swim through numerous parts of the ship. There are guns, cannons, Jeeps, a stunning statue of "The Lady", chandeliers, and a mosaic tile fountain. Coral grows around the ocean liner where the divers can view sea creatures such as reef fish, barracuda, sea turtles and moray eels. 3. The Titanic, was the world’s largest cruise ship sank on her maiden voyage on April in 1912. The ship was touted as “unsinkable” and was supposed to be one of the safest ships ever built in history. She collided with an iceberg, and nearly half of the passengers lost their lives due to the inadequate supply of life boats on board. 2. The Lion City is a real life Atlantis located in China. The city was purposely flooded to make way for a build hydroelectric power station in 1959. Unfortunately, the city was forgotten but remains largely intact for being underwater for fifty years. Currently, there are plans in the works for divers because they like to use the metropolis to use as a tourist site. 1. SS Thistlegorm merchant ship that was sunk during World War II in the Red Sea. She set to sell for Alexandria, Egypt when two bombs were dropped on her from above. The bombs struck the stern of the ship, and it quickly sank. The ship and holds everything from vehicles, motorcycles, ammunition and other weaponry. Now the SS Thistlegorm is used as a recreational diving site.





How I Make a Ship in a Bottle.
This is the traditional method. The model is NOT built INSIDE the bottle, it is built outside the bottle and of a size that can JUST BEARLY FIT into the neck of the bottle with the masts folded over. The masts are hinged to fold, and the rigging of the masts extends outside of the bottle and can be pulled from outside.The sails are not glued to this example model, but they are made of paper and glued to the masts and flex and bend enough to make it through the neck of the bottle too.




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