Junkers JU 52 takeoff, landing at Lelystad airshow + Mustang

Watch a Junkers JU 52 take off, fly around and land at Lelystad airport at historic airshow! In addition, see the P 51D Mustang "Damn Yankee" and the B 25 Mitchell bomber taxi and take off. Plenty close-up footage and awesome sounds from piston engines.

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Heinkel HE-111 - German Bomber - Falcon Field - Mesa AZ
This was CAF's HE-111, Heinkel a WWII German Bomber. It was the only flying example in the world but sadly this very plane crashed on July of 2003 killing the crew on-board: http://www.warbirdalley.com/he111.htm I am not totally sure when this video was taken, but I suspect it was around 1998. It was a Spanish-built CASA 2.111D that was not used for bombing but more of a VIP Transport Plane. According to that website another HE-111 is being restored, so good. If you listen as the plane taxis away, one of the CAF guys is talking to a kid as to the specifics of that plane. Kinda interesting anyway. Once again sorry for the shaky camera bit. I wish I had a tripod at the time.





Messerschmitt BF109 G6
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Junkers Ju 52/3m
Video and Audio content is Copyright © 2015 Malcolm Auld This video and audio material may not be used in any form without written permission. Please help to support this channel by subscribing. The Junkers Ju 52 (nicknamed Tante Ju ("Aunt Ju") and Iron Annie) was a German trimotor transport aircraft manufactured from 1931 to 1952. It saw both civilian and military service during the 1930s and 1940s. In a civilian role, it flew with over twelve air carriers including Swissair and Deutsche Luft Hansa as an airliner and freight hauler. In a military role, it flew with the Luftwaffe as a troop and cargo transport and briefly as a medium bomber. The Ju 52 continued in postwar service with military and civilian air fleets well into the 1980s. The Ju 52 was similar to the company's previous Junkers W 33, although larger. In 1930, Ernst Zindel and his team designed the Ju 52 at the Junkers works at Dessau. The aircraft's unusual corrugated duralumin metal skin, pioneered by Junkers during World War I, strengthened the whole structure. The Ju 52 had a low cantilever wing, the midsection of which was built into the fuselage, forming its underside. It was formed around four pairs of circular cross-section duralumin spars with a corrugated surface that provided torsional stiffening. A narrow control surface, with its outer section functioning as the aileron, and the inner section functioning as a flap, ran along the whole trailing edge of each wing panel, well separated from it. The inner flap section lowered the stalling speed and the arrangement became known as the Doppelflügel, or "double wing". Lufthansa's 21st-century airworthy heritage Ju 52/3mg2e (Wk-Nr 5489) in flight, showing the Doppelflügel, "double wing" trailing edge control surfaces. The outer sections of this operated differentially as ailerons, projecting slightly beyond the wingtips with control horns. The strutted horizontal stabilizer carried horn-balanced elevators which again projected and showed a significant gap between them and the stabilizer, which was adjustable in-flight. All stabilizer surfaces were corrugated. The fuselage was of rectangular section with a domed decking, all covered with corrugated light alloy. There was a port side passenger door just aft of the wings, with windows stretching forward to the pilots' cockpit. The main undercarriage was fixed and divided; some aircraft had wheel fairings, others not. There was a fixed tailskid, or a later tailwheel. Some aircraft were fitted with floats or skis instead of the main wheels. In its original configuration, designated the Ju 52/1m, the Ju 52 was a single-engined aircraft, powered by either a BMW or Junkers liquid-cooled engine. However, the single-engine model was underpowered, and after seven prototypes had been completed, all subsequent Ju 52s were built with three radial engines as the Ju 52/3m (drei motoren — "three engines"). Originally powered by three Pratt & Whitney R-1690 Hornet radial engines, later production models mainly received 574 kW (770 hp) BMW 132 engines, a licence-built refinement of the Pratt & Whitney design. Export models were also built with 447 kW (600 hp) Pratt & Whitney R-1340 Wasp and 578 kW (775 hp) Bristol Pegasus VI engines. The two wing-mounted radial engines of the Ju 52/3m had half-chord cowlings and in planform view (from above/below) appeared to be splayed outwards, being mounted at an almost perpendicular angle to the tapered wing's sweptback leading edge. The central engine had a cowling like a Townend ring as the fuselage behind it was increasing in diameter, though some later aircraft had deeper cowlings. Production Ju 52/3m aircraft flown by Luft Hansa before World War II, as well as Luftwaffe-flown Ju 52s flown during the war, usually used an air-start system to turn over their trio of radial engines, using a common compressed air supply that also operated the main wheels' brakes.





Ju 52 - Start in Bensheim
Junkers Ju 52 beim Motoren anlassen und beim Startvorgang auf dem Flugfest 2011 in Bensheim




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