Dyno TEST - V8-hayabusa engine - Hartley Enterprises

IT DOESNT WANT TO STOP !! This engine is made by Hartley Enterprises, what they did was fuse two hayabusa's top-ends to a common crankshaft; to make a 75 degree V8. They tested the engine in a Caterham Super 7. It makes 306 wheel horsepower, about 375 flywheel horsepower; Its ONLY a 2.6 Liter engine, and the engine rev's all the way to 10,500 rpm ! they also have a 2.8 Liter version that is even more astounding, the 2.8L makes 400 horsepower and 245 ft-lbs torque. AND THE ENGINE ONLY WEIGHS 200LBS !!!! JUST WAIT TILL THEY MAKE A Supercharger FOR THIS BEAST!!! check the site - http://www.h1v8.com/page/page/1562068.htm

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