455 Pontiac-Powered AMC Pacer Wheelie

Please visit www.Mopacer.com to see my Purple Pacer X that is in Hot Rod Magazine, http://www.hotrod.com/featuredvehicles/index.html . My Dad built this Drag Pacer back in 1987. It ran a footbraked best of 10.85 @ 125 w/1.44 60 ft. The new owner painted it black and lives in Kenosha. New video of this run: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZ3PUqFM8c8

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AMC Pacer
Little AMC Pacer. Inline 6 Indian version. Great little car





Uw Garage: AMC Pacer X (1975) - by Autovisie TV
De AMC Pacer staat in elke top 10 van de lelijkste auto's ooit. David Dunnebier uit Almere trok zich daar niets van aan en bezit nu zo'n seventies icoon.





1978 AMC Pacer
The AMC Pacer is a two-door compact automobile that was produced in the United States by the American Motors Corporation between 1975 and 1980. Design work began in 1971. The rounded shape and large glass area were unusual compared with the three-box designs of the era. The Pacer's width is equal to full-sized domestic vehicles at the time, and this unique design feature was promoted by AMC as "the first wide small car."[2] The Pacer was the first modern mass-produced, U.S. automobile design using the cab forward concept. The Pacer's rounded and aerodynamic "jellybean" styling has made it an icon of the 1970s. The May 1976 issue of Car and Driver dubbed it "The Flying Fishbowl", and it was also described as "the seventies answer to George Jetson's mode of transportation at a time when "Detroit was still rolling out boat-sized gas guzzlers. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AMC_Pacer S159





The Unfortunate History of the AMC Pacer
Behind all the jokes and insults, the AMC Pacer is actually a car with a great deal of history. It began as radical new design from an underdog company. In an attempt to combat the big, bland, boxy cars from Detroit's "Big Three," little American Motors Corporation decided to build something a little different. Their one-eyed car stylist Dick Teague proposed a small, wide car with big windows and smooth areodynamics. Americans had never seen anything like it. This in-depth documentary tells the true story of the Pacer. Unbeknownst to many, the car persevered through manufacturing setbacks, government regulations, and many other troubles. Featuring a ton of old car advertisements and rare footage of AMC's factory, the film helps paint a picture of the Pacer's world. Director Joe Ligo sits down with AMC stylist Vincent Geraci, author Patrick Foster, and television personalities John Davis and Pat Goss from PBS's MotorWeek.




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