HID startup II

Starting and warmup of a Philips 35 watt D2R Automotive Xenon-Metal Halide HID lamp with the reflector removed. This type of lamp is commonly used for headlights in luxury vehicles such as Mercedes, BMW, or Lexus. Automotive Metal Halide lamps are commonly called "xenon lamps" due to the presence of xenon gas used to fill the arc tube. The xenon gas allows these lamps to provide a minimally adequate amount of light upon startup. If this lamp was filled with argon instead as is commonly done in street lamps or other stationary HID lamps; it would take several minutes for it to reach full brightness vs 30 seconds.

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HID Headlights: What They Are & How They Work
Learn about car HID headlights in this educational video as we discuss what HID headlights are, how they work, and why you want them for your car. Sonic Electronix carries a wide range of HID head lights and HID head light accessories. Check them out here! http://www.sonicelectronix.com/cat_i1204_hid-headlight-kits.html





Headlight Comparison : Laser v LED v HID Xenon v Halogen
It wasn’t that long ago that headlights were a no-thought-required feature. All cars had them and no one really paid them much heed unless they failed or were shaped in a particularly ugly manner. Halogen Reliably generating light with the limited resources at a car’s disposal was a problem for early automotive engineers. Tungsten filaments, similar to the kind found in household incandescent light bulbs, were finally settled on as the solution. From the mid-1960s until now these tungsten filaments have been encased in a bubble of halogen gas in order to improve performance and longevity. For much of their history, tungsten and halogen lamps focused light on the road via a lens that doubled as the headlight’s protective housing; now the two jobs are separate. High intensity discharge In high intensity discharge (HID) headlights, such as those used across the Lexus IS range, a mixture of rare metals and gases are heated to produce a bright white glow. HIDs are around two to three times brighter than halogen lamps and their glare can be particularly annoying for other road users. As such, the Australian Design Rules require cars equipped with HIDs to also have a self-levelling mechanism and a headlight washer. The former ensures that the headlights are always aimed towards the ground. The latter minimises the build up of dirt and grime, both of which can divert more light into the eyes of on-coming drivers. Despite their brighter output, HID lamps require less power to operate. They generally draw about 35 watts and are said to be good for around 2000 hours of use. LED Light emitting diodes (LEDs) have come a long way from the simple flashing lights on beige computer cases to being key components in modern cars, phones and televisions. Whether you realise it or not, they provide most of the lighting used in today’s instrument panels, entertainment head units and car interiors. As well, arrays of these diodes are employed in fog lamps, indicators and brake lights. Car designers love LEDs because their small size allows them to be fashioned into ever thinner and more distinctive shapes. Although LED headlights currently fall a little short of the brightness achieved by HIDs, they hit maximum brightness within a millionth of a second compared with the half second required by incandescent and halogen lights. Laser In the Audi R8 LMX, laser beam is used only as a supplement to the existing LED headlights, activating only when automatic high-beam is being used with the aim to double the range of light compared with LED high-beam – to a full 500 metres. So, how does it work? Where many light-emitting diodes (LED) are used within a regular headlight assembly, lasers work in a different fashion. In the R8 LMX there are only four laser diodes each with a diameter of 300 micrometres, or just 0.3 millimeters – talk about tiny! They are wrapped tightly in what Audi calls a “radiation-tight aluminium module.” Rather than pointing out towards the road like a normal beam, however, they instead are directed in a V-shape to a single point on a mirror, each strand of laser producing a wavelength of 450 nanometers. ------------------------------------------------------------- http://CarAdvice.com.au is focused on getting people into the right car for them. We understand the different needs buyers face when making the decision to purchase a car, and our comprehensive reviews aim to help you make the right decision. Our videos and articles are created by expert and unbiased journalists who are passionate about their work. We welcome the opportunity to answer your questions and encourage discussion. Don’t hesitate to ask us a question about a car and we will try to guide you to the right car for you. Subscribe to CarAdvice for the latest reviews, road tests, comparisons, news and opinions in the automotive world. SUBSCRIBE HERE http://youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=CarAdvice CONNECT WITH US — https://facebook.com/CarAdvice — https://twitter.com/car_advice — https://plus.google.com/+caradvice





Xenon-Vision Bi-Xenon HID Install
Here are a few things to keep in mind: 1. There is NO need to disable the Daytime Running Light (DRL) module if you have the Bi-Xenon HID kit. The reason being that the DRLs will run off the low beam and will not flicker as I initially thought. If you have the non-Bi-Xenon (no HID hi-beam), then you WILL have to disable the DRLs (from what I understand). 2. If you happened to have disable the DRLs, it is likely that your interior dome light will not work, as was my experience. No idea why the DRL module is connected to the dome light but I'm not a Toyota engineer. 3. There are two things that look like grounding wires in the kit ... they actually are not. They are connected to the battery terminals. The wire coming from the two fuses go to the POSITIVE terminal while the wire coming off the control unit go to the NEGATIVE terminal. I unscrewed the nut that helps tighten the clamp around the battery and then placed the wire in between the clamp and the nut. 4. The clips only fit one way except for the one on the ballast. You will see in the video how they should connect but the red wire should go to the POSITIVE terminal. 5. There is a metal bar in the front of the car with holes in it. Run the wiring through that to ensure that the wires don't melt on the radiator or get caught in the fan (that would be bad news!). 6. Lay your wires out to get a sense of how things connect together. 7. It is normal to have one of the original headlight wiring harness not connected. All in all, the install is very easy. I did it in about an hour and a half but if I knew what I just wrote above, it probably would have taken 30 minutes. Hope this help anyone that is installing the Bi-Xenon kit in their Yaris! If you have any questions, please quote this post and I will do my best to answer them for you. Cheers llcooljayce PS. This is a bit of a rough edit job ... I'm no Sony Vegas master ... yet.





XENON SHORT ARC LAMPS PART 1
MY HOME MADE XENON POWER SUPPLY AND LAMP.




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