2013 March Meet Funny Cars Drag Racing Nitro Nostalgia Famoso Raceway USA Race Video

Nitro Funny Car Drag Racing March Meet Bakersfield USA Race Cars Hot Rod Drag Strip Riot Videos Famoso Raceway Burnouts March 7-10, 2013 55th Smokers Bakersfield March Meet; Nostalgia Funny Car first round; Mark Sanders in the Mr. Explosive Mustang over Dan Horan Jr.; Jason Rupert over Rian Konno; Chad Head over Will Martin; John Hale over Dennis La Charite; Ron Capps LA Hooker Arrow over Garrett Bateman; Roger Garten in his War Horse Ford Mustang over Steve Densham in the Teacher's Pet who was shut off prior to staging; Del Worsham over James Day; Tim Boychuck over Robert Overholser in the gorgeous California Hustler 1977 Pontiac Trans Am. Drag Strip Riot Videos. Let her rip! Funny Car is a type of drag racing vehicle and a specific racing class in organized drag racing. In the United States, the other professional drag racing classes are Top Fuel, Pro Modified, Pro Stock, and Pro Stock Bike. Funny cars are characterized by having tilt-up fiberglass or carbon fiber automotive bodies over a custom fabricated chassis, giving them an appearance vaguely approximating manufacturers' showroom models. They also have the engine placed in front of the driver, as opposed to dragsters, which place it behind the driver.[1] Funny car bodies typically reflect the models of newly available cars in the time period that the funny car was built. For example, in the 1970s, then current models such as the Chevrolet Vega or Plymouth Barracuda were often represented as funny cars, and the bodies represented the Big Three of General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler.[2] Currently, four manufacturers are represented in National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) Funny Car — Chevrolet with the Camaro,[3] Dodge with the Charger,[4] Ford with the Mustang,[5] and Toyota with the Camry.[6] Worldwide, however, many different body styles are used. These "fake" body shells are not just cosmetic; they serve an important aerodynamic purpose.[7] Today, fielding a Funny Car team can cost between US$2.6 and US$3 million.[8] A single carbon fiber body can cost US$70,000.[9] Nitro Funny Car racing has never been more competitive than since 2006.[10] The dominance of John Force Racing ended in 2006 and between 2007 and 2015 was equalled by DSR, with three TF/FC titles each.[11] Funny Car is dominated by multi-car teams, with only Cruz Pedregon, Jim Dunn, and Tim Wilkerson maintaining the traditional one-car operation 2013 55th Smokers Bakersfield March Meet. Nostalgia Drag Racing Videos, A/Gas, Nitro Top Fuel Dragster, Funny Cars, Wayne Mellinger Corvette Funny Car Crash, Crash, Funny Car body explosion, Auto Club Famoso Raceway, Bakersfield, California. Brought to you by http://www.dragstripgirldesigns.com Drift HD Action POV Camera, blower explosion. March meet promo Funny Car is a type of drag racing vehicle and a specific racing class in organized drag racing. In the United States, the other professional drag racing classes are Top Fuel, Pro Modified, Pro Stock, and Pro Stock Bike. Funny cars are characterized by having tilt-up fiberglass or carbon fiber automotive bodies over a custom fabricated chassis, giving them an appearance vaguely approximating manufacturers' showroom models. They also have the engine placed in front of the driver, as opposed to dragsters, which place it behind the driver.[1] Funny car bodies typically reflect the models of newly available cars in the time period that the funny car was built. For example, in the 1970s, then current models such as the Chevrolet Vega or Plymouth Barracuda were often represented as funny cars, and the bodies represented the Big Three of General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler.[2] Currently, four manufacturers are represented in National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) Funny Car — Chevrolet with the Camaro,[3] Dodge with the Charger,[4] Ford with the Mustang,[5] and Toyota with the Camry.[6] Worldwide, however, many different body styles are used. These "fake" body shells are not just cosmetic; they serve an important aerodynamic purpose.[7] Today, fielding a Funny Car team can cost between US$2.6 and US$3 million.[8] A single carbon fiber body can cost US$70,000.[9] Nitro Funny Car racing has never been more competitive than since 2006.[10] The dominance of John Force Racing ended in 2006 and between 2007 and 2015 was equalled by DSR, with three TF/FC titles each.[11] Funny Car is dominated by multi-car teams, with only Cruz Pedregon, Jim Dunn, and Tim Wilkerson maintaining the traditional one-car operation

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2012 Jalopy Showdown Drags Nitro Dragster Nostalgia Drag Racing Beaver Springs Dragway USA Video
Drag Racing Nostalgia Front Engine Dragster Little Honker Coupe Hot Rod USA Race Car Drag Strip Riot Videos Beaver Springs Dragway September 29 - 2012 Rod and Kulture Magazine Jalopy Showdown Drags at Beaver Springs Dragway. Hot rods drag racing. Drag Strip Riot Videos. Bobby and Tyler Hilton's Little 'Honker' - Vintage Supercharged Oldsmobile Competition Gas Coupe on a full smoky pass. Gassers Nostalgia Drag Racing Drift HD Action POV Camera. The front engine dragster came about due to engines initially being located in the car's frame in front of the driver. They did not use (and current dragsters still do not use) any form of suspension. Because of this, these types of vehicles were prone to becoming unstable at speed. This is due to their making 2,000–3,000 hp (1,491–2,237 kW), plus having poor tire technology, short wheelbases, and very light weight. (This was demonstrated to extremes in the Fuel Altereds.) The driver sits angled backward, over the top of the differential in a cockpit situated between the two rear tires, a design originating with Mickey Thompson in 1954, as a way of improving traction.[2] This position led to many drivers being maimed when catastrophic clutch failures occurred.[3] Introduced with the start of organized drag racing, they were limited by the availability of traction from their rear tires or "slicks". A number of dragsters with four rear drive wheels were attempted as well, including cars by Art Chrisman (along with his brother, Lloyd, and partner Frank Cannon), Bill Coburn,[4] and Eddie Hill.[5] (Coburn and the Chrisman brothers used twin engines, also.)[4] The slingshot produced a number of fatal wrecks in the 1960s, including Mike Sorokin's and John Mulligan's (months after suffering severe burns in a fire at the Nationals in 1969). Clutches, bellhousings, blowers, and engines exploded, with e.t.s hitting 6.43 seconds by the end of 1969, a pass recorded by Mulligan to qualify #1 at the Nationals. Other accidents included a flip (what today would be called "blowover") by Jim Nicoll at the 1970 Nationals after a clutch failure.[6] The slingshot's advantages, putting weight over the rear tires, now served to cause the front end to lift, as tire technology improved, to the point ballast, sometimes hundreds of pounds worth, had to be added over the front axle,[7] while others, like Ronnie Scrima (on his Scrimaliner) and Tony Nancy, would mount a winglet. [8] The drawbacks led to several attempts at rear-engined cars, but the rail was only supplanted by the rear-engined type (which is now standard) when Don Garlits introduced Swamp Rat XIV in 1971.[9] He designed the car while in hospital, having suffered from severe injuries caused by an exploding clutch.[3]




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