Nitro Nostalgia Funny Cars Drag Racing Video March Meet Bakersfield Famoso Raceway

Nitro Funny Car Drag Racing Video March Meet Bakersfield Race Cars Drag Strip Riot Famoso Raceway Burnouts March 7-10, 2013 55th Smokers Bakersfield March Meet; Nostalgia Funny Car first round; Mark Sanders in the Mr. Explosive Mustang over Dan Horan Jr.; Jason Rupert over Rian Konno; Chad Head over Will Martin; John Hale over Dennis La Charite; Ron Capps LA Hooker Arrow over Garrett Bateman; Roger Garten in his War Horse Ford Mustang over Steve Densham in the Teacher's Pet who was shut off prior to staging; Del Worsham over James Day; Tim Boychuck over Robert Overholser in the gorgeous California Hustler 1977 Pontiac Trans Am. Funny Car is a type of drag racing vehicle and a specific racing class in organized drag racing. In the United States, the other professional drag racing classes are Top Fuel, Pro Modified, Pro Stock, and Pro Stock Bike. Funny cars are characterized by having tilt-up fiberglass or carbon fiber automotive bodies over a custom fabricated chassis, giving them an appearance vaguely approximating manufacturers' showroom models. They also have the engine placed in front of the driver, as opposed to dragsters, which place it behind the driver.[1] Funny car bodies typically reflect the models of newly available cars in the time period that the funny car was built. For example, in the 1970s, then current models such as the Chevrolet Vega or Plymouth Barracuda were often represented as funny cars, and the bodies represented the Big Three of General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler.[2] Currently, four manufacturers are represented in National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) Funny Car — Chevrolet with the Camaro,[3] Dodge with the Charger,[4] Ford with the Mustang,[5] and Toyota with the Camry.[6] Worldwide, however, many different body styles are used. These "fake" body shells are not just cosmetic; they serve an important aerodynamic purpose.[7] Today, fielding a Funny Car team can cost between US$2.6 and US$3 million.[8] A single carbon fiber body can cost US$70,000.[9] Nitro Funny Car racing has never been more competitive than since 2006.[10] The dominance of John Force Racing ended in 2006 and between 2007 and 2015 was equalled by DSR, with three TF/FC titles each.[11] Funny Car is dominated by multi-car teams, with only Cruz Pedregon, Jim Dunn, and Tim Wilkerson maintaining the traditional one-car operation 2013 55th Smokers Bakersfield March Meet. Nostalgia Drag Racing Videos, A/Gas, Nitro Top Fuel Dragster, Funny Cars, Wayne Mellinger Corvette Funny Car Crash, Crash, Funny Car body explosion, Auto Club Famoso Raceway, Bakersfield, California. Brought to you by http://www.dragstripgirldesigns.com Drift HD Action POV Camera, blower explosion. March meet promo

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2012 Ignitor Nostalgia Funny Car
The 42nd annual Napa Auto Parts Ignitor from Firebird Raceway, Boise Idaho.





Nostalgia Top Fuel Dragster Drag Racing Video March Meet Bakersfield Famoso Raceway
Front Engine Dragster Top Fuel Nostalgia Drag Racing Videos Nitro Race Cars March Meet Bakersfield Famoso Raceway Hot Rods March 1-4, 2012 Bakersfield March Meet; Nostalgia Front Engine Top Fuel Dragster First Round: Mike Irwin upsets low qualifier Tony Bartone 6.76 to 6.85; Bill Dunlap defeats Rick Williamson 5.92 to 6.08; Jim Young gets win over Ernest McClain 6.59 to 10.28; Rick White defeats Brendan Murry 5.62 to 6.00; Jon Rasmussen upsets Jim Murphy 6.21 to 6.30; Adam Sorokin takes out Terry Cox 5.79 to 5.90; Mendy Fry defeats Rick McGee 5.97 to 7.32. Bartone Bros. Racing Team. How a Top Fuel Dragster Works. Top Fuel Drag Racing 2012 Bakersfield March Meet. Nostalgia Drag Racing, A/Gas, Nitro Top Fuel Dragster, Funny Cars, Crash, Funny Car body explosion, Auto Club Famoso Raceway, Bakersfield, California. Brought to you by http://www.dragstripgirldesigns.com Drift HD Action POV Camera, antron brown, winternationals, explodes, Motor Racing. Top Fuel dragsters are the quickest accelerating racing vehicles in the world and the fastest sanctioned category of drag racers, with the fastest competitors reaching speeds of 335 miles per hour (539 km/h) and finishing the 1,000 foot (305 m) runs in 3.7 seconds. Because of the speeds, this class almost exclusively races to only a 1,000 foot (305 m) distance, and not the traditional 1⁄4 mile (402 m). The rule was changed in 2008 by the National Hot Rod Association following the fatal crash of Funny Car driver Scott Kalitta during a qualifying session at Old Bridge Township Raceway Park in Englishtown, New Jersey, USA. The shortening of the distance was used in the FIA at some tracks, and as of 2012 is now the standard Top Fuel distance. The Australian National Drag Racing Association is the only internationally recognized sanctioning body that still races Top Fuel dragsters at the earlier 1,320 feet (402 m) standard distance for the majority of races for such events. A top fuel dragster accelerates from a standstill to 100 miles per hour (160 km/h) in as little as 0.8 seconds (less than one third the time required by a production Porsche 911 turbo to reach 60 mph (97 km/h))[1] and can exceed 450 km/h (280 mph) in just 200 metres (660 ft). This subjects the driver to an average acceleration of about 39 m/s2 (4.0 g0) over the duration of the race and with a peak of over 5.6 g. NHRA regulations limit the composition of the fuel to a maximum of 90% nitromethane (Since 2015); the remainder is largely methanol. However, this mixture is not mandatory, and less nitromethane may be used if desired. Kenny Bernstein was the first drag racer in NHRA history to break 300 mph (480 km/h) in such a class of car on the 1⁄4 mi (402 m) at the Gatornationals on March 21, 1992, and Tony Schumacher the first over 310 mph (500 km/h) under the new rules established in 2008 with the shorter strip.[3] While nitromethane has a much lower energy density (11.2 MJ/kg) than either gasoline (44 MJ/kg) or methanol (22.7 MJ/kg), an engine burning nitromethane can produce up to 2.3 times more power than an engine burning gasoline. This is made possible by the fact that, in addition to fuel, an engine must burn oxygen in order to generate force: 14.7 kg of air (21% oxygen) is required to burn one kilogram of gasoline, compared to only 1.7 kg of air for one kilogram of nitromethane, which, unlike gasoline, already has oxygen in its molecular composition. This means that an engine can burn 8.7 times more nitromethane than gasoline. Nitromethane also has a high latent heat of vaporization, meaning that it will absorb substantial engine heat as it vaporizes, providing an invaluable cooling mechanism. The laminar flame speed and combustion temperature are higher than gasoline at 0.5 m/s and 2400 °C respectively. Power output can be increased by using very rich air fuel mixtures. This is also something that helps prevent pre-ignition, something that is usually a problem when using nitromethane. Due to the relatively slow burn rate of nitromethane, very rich fuel mixtures are often not fully ignited and some remaining nitromethane can escape from the Exhaust pipe and ignite on contact with atmospheric oxygen, burning with a characteristic yellow flame. Additionally, after sufficient fuel has been combusted to consume all available oxygen, nitromethane can combust in the absence of atmospheric oxygen, producing hydrogen, which can often be seen burning from the Exhaust pipes at night as a bright white flame. In a typical run the engine can consume between 12 US gallons (45 L) and 22.75 US gallons (86.1 L) of fuel during warmup, burnout, staging, and the quarter-mile run.





Jeff Brock Bonneville Buick
Jeff Brock, driving his "Bombshell Betty" 1952 Buick Super Riviera, sets a new class world-record at Bonneville in early October 2012.





13 INSANE DRAG RACING CRASHES!!!
13 Insane crashes from the Urban Hillbilly Videos Vault, filmed at various Drag Strips across the US. All drivers were uninjured. Check us out on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/pages/Urban-Hillbilly-Action-Videos/10926451580866 4




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