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Blueprint 102 - Measuring 4g63 Crankshaft Endplay

4g63's are famous for hosing crankshaft thrust bearings. This video illustrates the process of how to check the thrust bearing clearance whether the motor's in the car or not. Of course in my case the motor's on a stand for this video. Lucky for me! In cases where the engine is still in the car, the same procedures can be used so long as the indicator is attached to the engine block. The plunger can be set up touching either the inside of the crank pulley or by removing the clutch cover plate and contacting the flywheel. What the thrust bearing does, is prevent the crankshaft from having lateral movement in the main bearings. If a crankshaft develops excessive movement here, clutch engagement and hydraulic problems will begin showing up, followed shortly thereafter by catastrophic failure of main bearings, rod bearings, connecting rod failures, oil pressure problems, or even broken blocks, crankshafts and rods in extreme cases. It's important that every 4g63 turbo engine is within spec on this measurement. When the crankshaft aggressively wears through the thrust bearing developing lateral play, this is called "crankwalk". On some block castings, replacing the bearings will NOT fix the problem. An engine block that is prone to crankwalking can not be fixed. The only option in these cases is to replace the shortblock and rotating assembly with new or used parts that are stronger than the one you've unfortunately encountered. For the 2g guys, the best option for repairing this problem is to remove the 7-bolt turbo shortblock your car came with and replace it with a 6-bolt from a 89-92.5 production date turbo DSM. Non-turbo blocks CAN be used; however, the block will not have oil squirters that aim towards the back of the pistons. That stream of oil aides lubrication to the wrist pins, cylinder bores, and somewhat cools the pistons. All good things on a turbo setup. Aside from that difference, there are no other differences between the non-turbo and turbo blocks. The pistons and thus the compression ratios are different, but that's it. Oil squirters can be machined into the main galleries of a non-turbo block, but it's more trouble than it's worth unless you can't find a turbo block. There are tons of differing theories about what causes crankwalk. Nearly all of them are plausible and logical arguments. I will not get into those debates in this video in order to focus on procedures for testing and replacement. Please feel free to google "crankwalk 4g63" and read the volumes of information available already. The arguments and gathered data are older than the Eclipse itself and in abundant supply on the internets. Magnus, RRE, VFAQ, and many other parts vendors have lengthy write-ups on their own research and development. The bottom line is that the 6-bolt shortblocks are LESS likely to suffer from this. Next time you see someone with a video that looks like it was shot with a potato asking "does this sound like crankwalk", you can send them this video. There's a reason for every noise, rather than focus on the sound, focus on eliminating the real problem. KNOW if it's out of spec.


 


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Blueprint 103 - Connecting Rods
Connecting rods are the crux of the engine. They're responsible for carrying the force of the explosions that occur in the combustion chamber and using it to turn the crankshaft. Oil clearance specifications of the "big end" and "small end" are crucial to maintaining consistent oil pressure. In this video we take 3 measurements: Rod Gap Rod Journal (also called Crank Pin) Diameters "Big End" Bore diameter Using the Journal diameters and the "Big End" Bores, you can calculate your oil clearances of each bearing. The process is illustrated here. Anyone rebuilding an engine who doesn't know its history should check all of these clearances whether or not they're re-using the rods. If the crank, bearings or connecting rods are going to be replaced, it's imperative that you measure the new parts as well to ensure they're in spec.





Cylinder Head 204 - Porting & Polishing
This is a first-generation 1992 1.6L Hyundai Elantra small-combustion-chamber head. Thats what it is. It's a J1 engine's cylinder head. In Cylinder Head 106 I talked about the mainstream porting theories as they are discussed. We looked at a cylinder head that I have thousands of dollars of professional work performed on, and a bone-stock second-generation head that I didn't port. In this video I just might do something you haven't seen done before. For some, that may be uncomfortable. The port and polish job I perform here is what I think will work best for my current build. This is not an extreme killer port job. What will be different here is where port textures are concerned, I will be following the advice of a reputable source that will remain un-named. You're free to port yours differently than I do in this video, and I give you that out, around the 20 minute marker. The Hyundai is far from being an ultimate-performance build. It's a $400 box of scraps with nothing but time invested. It's perfect for this video. My finished product WILL be an improvement over what I had. I don't yet have access to a flow bench. I still have an achievement to un-lock. As far as you should be concerned with the techniques I employ... without flow numbers there is no evidence of what this will do, but we will gather lots of info from dynp sessions and drag strip time slips. If I could test it on a flow bench, I would. There are MANY, and when I say many, I mean thousands of flame war mongering pirates floating around on rough seas with a hair trigger cannon finger itching to fire if you port a head any differently than what the herd mentality says to do while porting a cylinder head. I cover the herd mentality because it has merit. It's been tested. Tried and true. But I don't follow it to the letter of the law. I'm definitely not here to de-bunk it. I would port a cylinder head differently for each build based on how that engine was used. There's an extremely valid reason why relating to air speed. It's not the texture of a port that maximizes the effect of fuel atomization, but the velocity of the air running through an x or y sized valve. The driving factor in this is the piston speed. I'm not going to give you the technical information, but will refer you to information about the Lovell factor. There's a better description of this in the links below, and even a calculator to help you find your engine's sweet spot. Why the Lovell factor is important: https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/3346/the-effect-of-valve-size Lovell gas factor calculator: http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/lovellgascalc.html Only people who have flow testing equipment know for sure what really works and have the capability to produce a perfectly-matched port job for the ultimate performance build. Those guys know the definition of ultimate, and THEY are floating below the water Aegis-class submarines ready to blow your comment up if you don't know what you're talking about. They don't care if you're an armchair mechanic or a herd of pirates. I will say, they're zoomed in pretty close on me right now, and I'm expecting to take a few hits. My work will be tested based on Dyno and drag strip performance, and the results will be posted here. Fortunately, those kinds of videos are a WHOLE LOT EASIER TO MAKE!!!





Hyundai Assembly 4 - Balancing Rods
I edited this video to its finished state, and RojoDelChocolate handed me a track with no collaboration that was the right length and rhythm. I literally did nothing to the video once the audio track was dropped in, and that's just how it went. I can't believe it. It's like when you're pumping gas into a Ford F150 full-blast and release the pump handle to stop right on $80.00 even. He's got more musical talent in his pinky fingernail than I have mechanical ability in my spleen, appendix and tonsils combined. Thank you RojoDelChocolate. Here I'm cleaning up the fly cuts, balancing the piston and rod assemblies and preparing to double-check my valve clearance. I had to start by cleaning up and re-lubricating every part that was removed to prevent contamination of the assembly. This is the tedious part of doing the job right. We learned that this whole engine assembly was pretty far-gone in previous videos, way past its service limits, so making it fit and work again takes extensive testing, machining, and re-testing to ensure all of the parts fit. This is likely the most challenging build I will perform on any car in my driveway. It has been so far. But because I have not demonstrated the basics of engine balancing beyond what a machine shop has to do to zero balance a flat-plane crankshaft, I thought I'd give it its own video right here with one of the test assemblies. When you balance rods by themselves, you balance the big-end and the pin-bore separately. You get weights of both ends of the rod using a jig and a process that I don't demonstrate in this video. The reason you do this is because the position of the weight behaves differently relative to its distance from the crankshaft pin. Weight on the big end has less of an effect than if there's extra weight on the pin bore. The best balanced engines have every part of the piston and rod assemblies balanced separately within .1 grams using the method I just described, and not the method shown in this video. The method shown here involves weighing ALL of the piston and rod assembly components together, and then taking out the difference just on the casting lines of the connecting rod. They were already off-balance and had never been balanced before. This is an improvement, not perfection. It's still something this engine needed to have done. I'm not using the big-end/small-end method here because these pistons are pressed-on and if I try to remove them from the rod, it will shatter the piston skirts. No thank you. I'm not replacing these pistons. The reason I grind down the casting lines is because it's weight is in a neutral territory, extending from the big end to the small end. It's easier to take an even amount off when you grind across the entire length of the rods. This method leaves a lot up to assumption as there's no way to determine which end of the rod is heavier, or if the weight is in a wrist pin or piston. All this does is ensure the crankshaft is spinning an even amount of weight on all 4 of its rod journals. Grams of weight turn into pounds of force at idle speeds. My goal is to remove that vibration at any and all rotations per minute if I can. So I make them all the same within 1.0 grams of their combined weight. If you're assembling and balancing all NEW parts, not parts that have worn together and need to go back in the same holes... you will have to balance the individual parts and pieces. This is the poor man's method. Even with the new parts you still do the poor man's method once you're done balancing the individual parts and assemble them, but sometimes when you're lucky with the new parts, you can just swap around the rods, pins and fasteners to balance the weights on each assembly and not have to grind anything at all. That's awfully nice when that happens. You know the Hyundai won't let me get away with that. Removing stress risers might help strengthen the rods, but it's not what I'm after here or else I would have removed the whole casting line from all of them. These rods should be fine for my goals. My goal is to remove just enough from all of the fatter rods (weight wise) to match the lightest one. Balancing an inline 4 engine with a flat-plane crank is easy if you have already balanced the crankshaft. This crank was already balanced for the GSX motor on a previous occasion. It's zero'd out. In order to balance the rotating assembly, all you do is make the piston and rod assemblies weigh identically to its neighbors. Just 3 grams of weight can produce over a hundred pounds of lateral forces at red-line so this is an aspect of engine building that you should not overlook. All you need to do is get all of them within 1 gram. The scale I'm using measures whole grams, so that's all I can do anyway. This method is acceptable for balancing a rotating assembly as long as you're smart about how to remove the weight.





Calculate Your Compression Ratio
This is everything you need to do to calculate your compression ratio. No foolin'. Every equation and process demonstrated. Find all your variables. Know your exact compression ratio in every cylinder. This is how you do it. Just because your service manual says your car is 7.8:1 or 8.5:1 compression doesn't mean that it is. Whenever there are casting irregularities, variations in piston height, parts that have been machined, non-OE parts, or changes to your head gasket selection, your compression ratio WILL change. It's highly probable that you're only CLOSE to spec if you've never touched your engine at all since it was "born", and that it doesn't MATCH spec. Even if it did, how would you know? This. 5 variables. V1 Swept Volume V2 Deck Volume V3 Piston-to-deck clearance V4 Piston dish cc's V5 Head combustion chamber cc's The ratio math: V1+V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at BDC V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at TDC The ratio is... (V1+V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) : (V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) or BDC ÷ TDC : TDC ÷ TDC First you fill in the variables, then you calculate volumes, then you add the volumes, then you reduce the ratio (fraction). It's that easy. Here are your magic numbers: 0.7854 = Pi quartered to the ten thousandth 16.387 = number of cc's in a cubic inch. If you divide any number in cc's by 16.387 it gives you inches. If you multiply any number in cubic inches by 16.387 it gives you cc's. Quartering pi lets you use the calculation: BORE x BORE x STROKE x .7854 = volume of a cylinder instead of... π x (BORE ÷ 2) x (BORE ÷ 2) x STROKE = volume of a cylinder Either way is right. You get the same result if you calculate pi to the ten thousandth. While I apologize for all the math, no I don't. I'm really not sorry. You actually clicked here for it whether you realize it or not. This is ALL the math, the tests, and the whole process to calculate your cylinder volumes and compression individually even if you don't know any of your variables yet. All of my numbers are present for those who want to calculate out the last 3 cylinders out of curiosity just to see how it affects cylinder volumes and compression ratios from one cylinder to the next. Why would I do that for you? Why would I deprive you of that practice? Just assume that all 4 of my combustion chambers are 41.75 ml if you do this. Clicking like share and subscribe helps a channel grow. It also motivates me. Don't sweat the camera. It's enough to know that so many of you care about what I'm doing here. From the bottom of my atmospheric dump, I thank you all! This gift horse's teeth are all over the place, but he sometimes poops gold nuggets. PS: Use ATF for your piston dish volume tests, not alcohol. Of course it's better just to use the spec sheet included with your pistons... but not everyone gets that luxury. Water is just fine for head combustion chamber tests. Dry and re-oil all parts that water touches.





2g GSX 4g63 Turbo Longblock Assembly
Freshening up the 7-bolt 4g63 for another round after the last transmission failure. This time I installed some new goodies... Tubular Exhaust Header Magnus Intake Manifold Magnus heat barrier gasket Rebuilt 1g Throttle Body Mirage 4g61 front case oil seal -6AN turbo coolant lines ARP Polished Stainless Steel fasteners new timing belt new accessory belts ARP cromoly crank pulley bolts FIC -8AN fuel rail deleted breather port added 2 -8AN breather ports to front of valve cover polished aluminum EVO half-moon seal JMFabrications coil-on-plug plate new Chrysler coils





Glyptal Application Process
In this video I detail the application process of a popular crankcase coating... that is... if crankcase coatings are actually popular. In this video, 98 coffee filters gave up the ghost. 238 q-tips paid the ultimate sacrifice. Almost a dozen brushes were executed, and 3 aerosol caps dispatched to their graves. Also, during the battle, several Dremel tools were maimed, one severely. Look, I'm doing everything I can to liven this topic up and make it interesting. Cleaning and painting are about the least interesting things someone else can watch. It's absolutely painful to edit, I know that much. It's not so bad for the guy doing the actual painting, but I'm doing my best to keep people's attention. This is a full month's work in a half hour. I had to space the job out because of my filming environment and the toxicity of materials I was working with. Take my warnings and advice in the video seriously. They're the words of someone who's done the job. They help set expectations. The most useful thing I can do is post links to other discussions that have already occurred, and to make room for places where people have posted their experience with failures of engine coatings. Despite my searching, I can not find any pictures or video. I found ONE plausible description of the kind of failure that can occur with improper application, but it was still a third-hand report. There are fans of this product posting in these threads. If you are considering this treatment, WEIGH THE PROS & CONS FOR YOUR BUILD, and YOUR HEALTH. Don't do this just because I did it. So until anyone provides photo or video evidence, here are the links to threads where it was discussed. This google search is mean. It's too direct and to-the-point. It might hurt somebody's feelings? Yes, I've read them all. http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=glyptal+caused+engine+f ailure&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8





How to port and polish a turbo exhaust housing
I'll fill this in later. The "book" I typed in this field before didn't save. Come back later if you want to read more about the theories behind porting and polishing.





Blueprint 104 - The Crankshaft
It's important to know what you've got even before dealing with the machinist. If you want to inspect a crankshaft, this is how you do it. I detail the process of removing the crank and what to measure. All specifications in this video are illustrated with a 6-bolt 4g63 turbo block, but are all actually the same for 7-bolt engines with the exception of the rod widths.





Blueprint 107 - piston-to-cylinder wall clearance
This video covers how easy it is to calculate piston-to-cylinder wall clearance. It's too easy. This is important because too loose of a gap and the rings won't seal properly. Too tight and the pistons will scuff the cylinder walls, ruining the bores. We've touched on thermal expansion several times now, and the reason it keeps coming up is because turbo engines achieve much higher cylinder pressures, and therefore generate more heat than a normally aspirated combustion chamber experiences. This affects the growth of the metal parts when they're at operating temperatures, so turbo pistons need more cylinder wall clearance to account for this. I will cover the ring grooves, compression and oil rings in a 200-series video while assembling this engine with new pistons. For now, these will just be saved for a rainy day. After all, I have a stock bore stock 4g63 engine in the Colt. Happy Thanksgiving!





Cylinder Head 108 - 4g63 Rockers
Cleaning and inspection of 4g63 rocker arms. Part 8 of the head series, and probably the easiest one yet to either watch or perform. No precision measurements required, no disassembly or special tools required. If you've got an air compressor and a pick, and a little bit of patience, you can do this part of the job without expending any major effort. This is one of those things that during the course of your build, you can do unconsciously. You just need to soak them, poke them, and inspect them. In this video I show you how. Some parts of the wheel Mitsubishi didn't want to re-invent each time they developed a new motor. These rocker arms are prevalent in millions of Mitsubishi, Plymouth, Chrysler, Dodge, Eagle, Hyundai and even some Kia engines. A good rule of thumb is... everything with a 4g6x DOHC or 6g72 and 6g74 engine uses these rocker arms. From 4x4's to economy cars, these parts are everywhere. You just need to know what cars they're in and you can harvest a full set for a fraction of the cost of one of these things new. If you watch this video, you'll see how to pick a winner. Check this link for 6g7x donor cars. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitsubishi_6G7_engine I didn't really want to see any of my rockers damaged, but really I'm lucky some were because it gave me an opportunity to show you some bad ones. Mine suffered from oil starvation caused by rod bearing failures. That loss of oil pressure in addition to oil passages being blocked quickly took a toll. Just 5000 miles earlier I changed to 3g lifters and they were all fine, so this happened quickly. HKS 264/272 cams didn't help anything once the oil supply was compromised, but this was discovered before a more expensive failure in the valvetrain could develop. Remember that sharing is caring. Hit the like and subscribe buttons because YouTube shows all of us a little more love when you do. :)





How to measure main bearing clearances
How to measure main journal bearing clearances in an engine using a dial bore gauge and micrometers.





Crankshaft Refurbishing
Many of you have seen this one before. I apologize if bringing it back offends anyone. Domestickilla gave me a crankshaft, and it's a nice one that I want to clean up and use again. You'll be seeing a lot of it and because of this, this video deserves to be here. I fixed what I broke, and this was my experience. In this video Ballos Precision Machine demonstrates magnetic dye penetrant testing, crankshaft polishing and inspecting the balance of a "butchered" 4g63 6-bolt crankshaft.





How to build a 4g63 Coil On Plug Assembly
This is just like all other do it yourself projects. 1) Buy parts that make doing the job easiest for you. 2) Put the stuff together. 3) Install it. No really, I used the JMFabrications Coil Plate, ordered all new UF269 Chrysler coils and wiring from Toyota. This video is intended to compliment thread #290665 at DSMTuners dot com which contains wiring diagrams and part numbers for these specific products. http://www.dsmtuners.com/forums/electrical-tech/166642-cop-coil-plug-igniti on-merged-1-8-a.html The only thing I did different was use 3/16" grommets in the harness holes rather than elongating them to prevent wire chaffing. I went a little overboard with the convoluted tubing, but it looks fantastic. you can get coils from Chrysler models... 1999-2003 300M 2003-2003 300M PRO-AM 2002-2003 300M SPECIAL 1998-2001 CONCORDE 2002-2003 CONCORDE LIMITED 2002-2003 CONCORDE LXI 1998-2003 INTREPID 1999-2001 LHS 2001-2002 PROWLER DODGE... 1998-2001 INTREPID 2000-2000 INTREPID ES 2000-2002 INTREPID R/T 2002-2003 INTREPID SE 2003-2003 INTREPID SXT 1997-2001 PROWLER What isn't covered in that thread is the necessity of a capacitive discharge system. In order for this to be any kind of upgrade a CDI is required. The factory coil pack on these cars is good for 30+ PSI.





How to Assemble a Chevy Engine Part 1
This video will show you how to assemble a Chevy engine (or any engine) starting from the basic block. It goes through installing the crankshaft, checking for the right clearences using plastic gage, installing the rings on the pistons, installling the piston in the block, checking the rod bearing clearence, torquing all the bolts to the collect specifications, installing the rear main seal, and demonstrating how the motor works from the bottom view and top view.





Cylinder Head 104 - Remove Valves & Springs
Just one of many ways to remove valves from a cylinder head. I haven't seen a valve compressor like this one on YouTube yet. I know it's nobody makes them like this, because this one is a custom hack job specifically for 4g63 heads... but it's extremely effective and easy to use. Since I don't own a valve grinder, valve spring pressure testers (for installed height measurement), or valve seat grinding stones... there are several services I'm unable to perform myself. But since I can get the head disassembled to this state, it would be easier and cheaper for me to have them serviced by someone who does. Valve grinding machine time is cheaper if they don't have to tear down the head. You can lap them in yourself, but if the seat's in really bad shape, it will require attention to allow any of those efforts to be worthwhile. Valve seat grinding if necessary needs to be done with the proper tools, and if the seats must be replaced, then it can get expensive. Usually $20-ish a hole. Sometimes an oversized bore can be cut into a factory seat. I'm ordering a set of valves to see if that's possible.





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