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Blueprint 102 - Measuring 4g63 Crankshaft Endplay

4g63's are famous for hosing crankshaft thrust bearings. This video illustrates the process of how to check the thrust bearing clearance whether the motor's in the car or not. Of course in my case the motor's on a stand for this video. Lucky for me! In cases where the engine is still in the car, the same procedures can be used so long as the indicator is attached to the engine block. The plunger can be set up touching either the inside of the crank pulley or by removing the clutch cover plate and contacting the flywheel. What the thrust bearing does, is prevent the crankshaft from having lateral movement in the main bearings. If a crankshaft develops excessive movement here, clutch engagement and hydraulic problems will begin showing up, followed shortly thereafter by catastrophic failure of main bearings, rod bearings, connecting rod failures, oil pressure problems, or even broken blocks, crankshafts and rods in extreme cases. It's important that every 4g63 turbo engine is within spec on this measurement. When the crankshaft aggressively wears through the thrust bearing developing lateral play, this is called "crankwalk". On some block castings, replacing the bearings will NOT fix the problem. An engine block that is prone to crankwalking can not be fixed. The only option in these cases is to replace the shortblock and rotating assembly with new or used parts that are stronger than the one you've unfortunately encountered. For the 2g guys, the best option for repairing this problem is to remove the 7-bolt turbo shortblock your car came with and replace it with a 6-bolt from a 89-92.5 production date turbo DSM. Non-turbo blocks CAN be used; however, the block will not have oil squirters that aim towards the back of the pistons. That stream of oil aides lubrication to the wrist pins, cylinder bores, and somewhat cools the pistons. All good things on a turbo setup. Aside from that difference, there are no other differences between the non-turbo and turbo blocks. The pistons and thus the compression ratios are different, but that's it. Oil squirters can be machined into the main galleries of a non-turbo block, but it's more trouble than it's worth unless you can't find a turbo block. There are tons of differing theories about what causes crankwalk. Nearly all of them are plausible and logical arguments. I will not get into those debates in this video in order to focus on procedures for testing and replacement. Please feel free to google "crankwalk 4g63" and read the volumes of information available already. The arguments and gathered data are older than the Eclipse itself and in abundant supply on the internets. Magnus, RRE, VFAQ, and many other parts vendors have lengthy write-ups on their own research and development. The bottom line is that the 6-bolt shortblocks are LESS likely to suffer from this. Next time you see someone with a video that looks like it was shot with a potato asking "does this sound like crankwalk", you can send them this video. There's a reason for every noise, rather than focus on the sound, focus on eliminating the real problem. KNOW if it's out of spec.


 


More Videos...


Blueprint 103 - Connecting Rods
Connecting rods are the crux of the engine. They're responsible for carrying the force of the explosions that occur in the combustion chamber and using it to turn the crankshaft. Oil clearance specifications of the "big end" and "small end" are crucial to maintaining consistent oil pressure. In this video we take 3 measurements: Rod Gap Rod Journal (also called Crank Pin) Diameters "Big End" Bore diameter Using the Journal diameters and the "Big End" Bores, you can calculate your oil clearances of each bearing. The process is illustrated here. Anyone rebuilding an engine who doesn't know its history should check all of these clearances whether or not they're re-using the rods. If the crank, bearings or connecting rods are going to be replaced, it's imperative that you measure the new parts as well to ensure they're in spec.





7-Bolt Shortblock Failure - Full Diagnosis
If you are your own mechanic, there is no more important character trait worthy of development than the ability to own your mistakes. That's where the line is drawn between good mechanics and bad mechanics. It's not the failures but how they deal with them that measures their ability. In short, it's not easy to admit you did something wrong or were negligent. But if you don't own it and talk about it, it doesn't get fixed, and nothing positive can come from it. It was my quest to overcome my clutch issue that lead to the creation of a video. That video is the textbook perfect guide for how to correctly install a DSM transmission. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6bE_9sWtnSY&list=PL4B97C16D423317DD Crankwalk as described is caused by a casting defect. This was not a defect. This was preventable. A lot of people would find something like this and not tell anyone out of embarrassment. I'm not ashamed. It's my fault. I got good use out of this engine and it was tough enough to make it 48K miles since the last rebuild despite my abuse. I'm here to tell you if you bought a used car that's had its clutch replaced, or if you ever pay someone else to do it... make sure it has this bolt. It's stashed away between the starter and the transfer case, so it's hard to see. Make sure all of your bell housing bolts are torqued properly because fastener problems can destroy your shortblock, clutch and transmission. If your car fails because of a mis-aligned transmission, you have no reason to blame crankwalk. It wasn't until I bought my next AWD car that I discovered there was a smaller bolt on the other side of the block. I destroyed 3 transmissions in the GSX first. With the damage already done to my crankshaft, I then lost a shortblock. It's an ounce of prevention that's worth metric tons on your bank account. Grade 10 M8x60 bell housing bolt = MD706012. It gets 22-25'lbs of torque. Owning my mistake permits me to learn from it through con$equence$, and never repeat it. What good would it have done anyone else for me to learn this lesson and not share it? That's why I'm providing this video to all of you. Sharing it can perhaps help someone else avoid this costly mistake. This is the final chapter for my 7-bolt, and this book is going back on the shelf. Here are some valuable resources if you're trying to read bearing damage: http://www.enginebuildermag.com/Article/5150/csi_engine_bearings_when_good_ bearings_go_bad.aspx http://catalog.mahleclevite.com/bearing/ http://www.studebaker-info.org/tech/Bearings/CL77-3-402.pdf And of course, now that I've covered the complete oil system, transmission and driveshaft series of videos, you now have all the tools necessary to ensure your 4g63 lasts a very long time. Whether the casting defect exists?... or it's all caused by a bolt, or the harmonics, or whatever... Sure, crankwalk exists and it's horrible. But with the small amount of movement required for your crankshaft before it contacts the block isn't far enough to make your clutch drop to the floor when you turn. You'd be hearing woodpeckers and jackhammers on the crank long before that clutch pedal would fall to the floor. Some people are going to hate on me for saying that. That's fine. I believe all of the people who experienced the clutch pedal issues had fastener problems on their bell housing. DSMs get a bad reputation for this but we can change that. Crankwalk is never the cause of your engine failure. Crankwalk is always a symptom of the real problem. It's your disease that makes you deny it's your fault. You've got the 'itis. DSM-itis. Whenever you dig deeper, you'll discover what applied all of those thrust loads to your crankshaft to begin with, and it's not going to be a casting defect that moves your crank .101". Mine only went .014", but all of the same parts failed. PLEASE tell me in the comments if you find this bolt is missing from your car.





Blueprint 101 - Using Micrometers, Calipers, & Bore Gauges
If you're going to rebuild an engine, this video is required material. None of your measurements mean anything if they're not accurate. I illustrate the calibration and use of 3 major tools needed for taking measurements, and a brief demonstration of how they work. These are by no means the ONLY ways to use or calibrate these tools. This is simply the method I will employ to measure parts in later videos so this instruction doesn't distract from their intended messages. Even if you're familiar with these tools, you may find something useful here, or even be able to correct me and my rusty skills.





Crankshaft Refurbishing
Many of you have seen this one before. I apologize if bringing it back offends anyone. Domestickilla gave me a crankshaft, and it's a nice one that I want to clean up and use again. You'll be seeing a lot of it and because of this, this video deserves to be here. I fixed what I broke, and this was my experience. In this video Ballos Precision Machine demonstrates magnetic dye penetrant testing, crankshaft polishing and inspecting the balance of a "butchered" 4g63 6-bolt crankshaft.





Block Preparation Part 1
Preparation for powder coating and Glyptal application. Audio track is an original performance by Rojo Del Chocolate. My block is being powder coated rather than painted. It's just something I do. The GSX had it on the last block so it's getting it again. Since the tools are so similar and the mess is the same, I'm going ahead and preparing it for the Glyptal application as well. These 2 coatings will require being baked separately. The powder coating is baked on at a hotter temperature than the Glyptal, so it's going first. The surface preparation instructions for Glyptal is as follows: Surface to be painted should be dry and free from dirt, wax, grease, rust and oil. Remove all grease and oil by washing surface with mineral spirits. Wipe or scrape off all loose dirt, rust or scale. The last sentence is what's covered in this video. The 2nd sentence happens next (although it's already degreased), and I'll get it back from powder coat with it in the state described in sentence #1 completed. If following these instructions to the letter of the law. Second and third opinions in... the main journal is fine. You'll notice that I didn't coat the main caps, or "suitcase handles". I'm not going to. You bang around on these installing and removing them, and I don't want to risk chipping them once they're coated. They're below the windage area, and there will also be an un-coated main bearing girdle down there. This video covered 25 hours of actual work. Yes, I kept changing into the same filthy clothes every shoot because I wanted it to look consistent. You have to take your time doing this kind of work, and be VERY VERY CAREFUL! If for some reason you're crazy enough to attempt what I do in this video, you do so at your own risk. This is an elective treatment that I've never done, but I am by no means the first person to do it. I'm learning about it just like the rest of you.





Cylinder Head 203 - Valve & Spring Installation
There are 2 critical values in getting your valvetrain geometry correct. Valve install height and spring install height. On some models of cylinder heads, getting these values is easier than it is on a 4g63 cylinder head. On the first Glyptal video, you heard me complain about the complexity of the casting and how hard it was to reach all the nooks and crannies while applying that coating. The casting is very complex on a 4g63 head. There are hydraulic galleries for the lifters elevated above the valvetrain surface which make accessing each valve bore with precision measurement tools very difficult. It's because of this that you need to do some math to get these values correct. Stuart is going to show you the process for obtaining the stem height and spring height values on a 4g63 head. Using these numbers you can determine other work necessary to correct the spring height value to correct seat pressure, and ensure you have adequate valve travel for your springs to work correctly. It looks like rocket surgery, but really it's pretty simple. The ultimate goal is to get every valve spring in as close proximity to one another as you can, while doing your best to nail the recommended specification PROVIDED BY THE VALVE SPRING MANUFACTURER. Loose valve springs can result in leaky valve seats, valve bounce and deflection that will drastically shorten the life of the valvetrain. If valve bounce is severe, it can cause engine-killing interference with the pistons Tight valve springs can cause excessive valvetrain vibration generated by the force necessary for the camshafts to push them open. On the narrow side of the spectrum this can increase friction on the cams which can wipe lobes and shorten their lifespan, and on the severe end in not only increases the likelihood of wiping a cam lobe, it can lead to binding valve springs and crashing the valvetrain. You have to hit the sweet spot. Valve springs specifications include several variables that help you achieve these goals. The manufacturer rates their springs for their installed pressure and height. They have a compression limit referred to as valve spring bind which tells you how far you can compress them from their installed height before the coils begin to bind and the spring stops compressing. The valve springs used in this video are rated at 97lbs @ 1.440" installed, and .500" lift. This means they should bind at .940", but my cams will only generate .433" lift, giving me plenty of head room at the top (.067") to prevent binding if they are installed correctly. One thing we found which I wasn't expecting is they're a little on the stiff side of spec. We measured 100lbs at 1.452", so rather than risk setting them up too tight, that's where we set our tight specification. This decision was made because if the rated pressure is lower than our actual measurements, this would in theory decrease the lift specification and increase the possibility of binding. Our install pressure ended up still higher than spec with a barely-larger-than-spec spring installed height. I don't consider this a defect. It is close enough within the margin of error that it shouldn't cause any problems, and anyone doing this job right will measure and check all of these specifications to ensure these parts are what they say they are. That's what you watched us do. I'm confident that this will work because the 4g63 utilizes a hydraulic self-adjusting valvetrain. If the stem height is too high, it can be reduced by grinding the ends of the valve stems to shorten them. This will have no affect on spring installed height when the parts are assembled, however; it will change the amount on paper that you'd need to subtract from the stem height in order to accurately calculate spring installed height. If any of the valves have been ground to shorten their stem height, all of the valves should be measured separately with their retainers and keepers assembled, and that new value subtracted from stem height individually to obtain each spring installed height. You can't reduce this value any other way short of replacing the valve seat. If the valve stem height is too low, you can modify the valve seat or machine the valve spring perches (seat or retainer) to increase the size of the spring installed height. Another method would be to cut the valve seat deeper to recess the valve. In my video, we show this whole process on a brand new set of Supertech valves. All of them are identical, and all of the retainers are new and identical. Because of this (and yes we checked it), and because no valves required any grinding, we only needed to use one value in our math for all 16 valves. Hopefully this video clears up the process and covers the options available for making changes if they're necessary. If you land within 3% of spec, you've done your diligence in achieving correct valvetrain geometry.





Checking Crankshaft thrust (endplay).MP4
How to check crankshaft thrust or endplay while assembling an engine.





DIY Parts Washer
IF you have access to compressed air, you can clean, degrease and restore the finish on automotive parts (and anything else really, not just DSMs) using the simple, inexpensive tools and supplies I demonstrate in this video. AUDIO TRACK BY: ROJODELCHOCOLATE* Some things don't fit in a parts washer. Sometimes you can't remove them from a vehicle. Sometimes you need to bring your parts washer to your project instead of the other way around. This INEXPENSIVE method for parts cleaning solves all of those problems. Caked-on grease, grime, carbon and oil are no match against this simple solution. For between $6 and $30 you can purchase a siphon-feed blow gun... spray gun... whatever you want to call it. NAPA sells an American made unit that's more expensive (like I used here) that occasionally suffer from quality control issues, and Harbor Freight sells one for $6 that I have no experience with. The tool is so simple that I can't see why it would work any differently. Mineral spirits (coal oil) is a highly-refined petroleum-based, low-odor, low-volatility solvent that can be used for many purposes from thinning paint to serving as thread cutting oil. Automotive professionals found that it actually lifts oil out of metal. This makes it an ideal choice for engine parts cleaning. Because most fluids in your car are petroleum-based, it's the ideal thinner to cut through the grease and wash away the funk. It has a much higher flash point than other solvents that are effective at cleaning up grease and oil. It's very similar to Kerosene. No special breathing aparatus is required. Gloves and googles are recommended. Because of its rapid evaporation, only minor preparations need to be made to your workspace to deal with the run-off. Vaporized mineral spirits evaporate completely just a few feet away from the blow gun, and drippings evaporate leaving only what washed off of your parts behind. If cleaning requires the use of brushes to break up soiled areas, use brushes that are appropriate for the materials you're cleaning. All in all, this solution costs about $10 for tools, and about $15 a gallon for mineral spirits. NO auto parts store solution like degreasers, or stinky, hazardous, toxic chemicals like brake cleaner will deliver these results. If you do this once, you'll be spoiled rotten. You will keep coming back to this mobile parts washer again and again whenever you need to degrease something. It's that good. Machine shops will clean your parts for you. You can do this without leaving your garage. Bring your own air compressor, and the bigger the better because of recovery time... but the siphon action isn't physically complicated, and anything from a pancake air compressor on-up will work. Oh... one more thing... Oil the &$^% out of cast iron parts when you're done. When stripped of oil, they will rust nearly instantly on contact with water or acids from your skin. Oil them. Soak them in clean oil afterwards. Tools you'll need... Siphon-feed blow gun: http://www.sears.com/shc/s/t_10153_12605?tName=air-siphon-gun.html http://www.thefind.com/hardware/info-blow-gun-siphon-sprayer ***** In the UK, Mineral Spirits are called White Spirits. ***** In China, White Spirits is pronounced "bok WHY?" with emphasis on why. Literally translated, that's "white ghost". It also means "egg" but I believe it's said a little differently. ba kwai is a derogatory slang term that Chinese use to describe white people. I'm not kidding. Either way, being called an egg might possibly bother a white person somewhere? Perhaps this is why I forgot to mention it in the video? It's too funny of a fact to leave out of the description. So, go make breakfast and have fun with your cheap, racist parts washer... no matter what color skin you're wrapped in. Mineral Spirits can be bought at your local hardware store. Mineral Spirits MSDS sheet (for the stuff I used in the video): http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=brands&id =16025013 Paint trays, wire brushes, and empty paint cans are also available at your local hardware store. I found that a 1 quart can with the lid cut off is the perfect size for cleaning pistons. Yes, you did see me bust out the Farberware can opener in my garage. A garage is simply a man's kitchen, so I see nothing wrong with this. Of course, it can be a woman's kitchen too... it just needs appliances that are appropriate for use near flammable liquids IF I'm going to be preparing any food while she fixes my car. I would never change my car's oil in a kitchen, though. I also wouldn't use cookware to catch automotive fluids. Just sayin'. * The man made me an 18 minute song in a day. Maybe some of you write music? Words can't describe how grateful I am to receive a quarter of an album from somebody on such short notice, or to explain my gratitude for his contribution.





4g63 Block Cleanup & Oil System Mods
With no data other than another person's testimony and from observing the condition of failed rod bearings I was able to determine this engine suffered problems from high oil pressure. There are 3 modifications that wanted to perform to its oil system, and 2 parts I chose to replace. All of the videos that go into greater detail about these modifications and parts are linked from this video. Though I've covered these topics, this is a video of the work being done to the Hyundai because it's part of its mod list. Also in the process I've stripped and removed all gaskets in preparation for parts washing. All of these tasks can be completed without an air compressor by taking your time with a razor blade or using electric grinding tools. If you're doing this kind of work, I strongly suggest for time's sake that you use an air compressor. If you have access to an air compressor and any of these [cheap] tools, then you can do these kinds of modifications for less than $20. NAPA sells everything but the spudger (below) individually so there's no need to buy these consumable supplies in bulk. 3m bristle discs: http://lmgtfy.com/?q=3m+roloc+bristle+disc I used this cleaning up the oil pan. It's a spudger. An electronics tool. http://lmgtfy.com/?q=spudger I also used 3m Scotch Brite wheels to clean the oil pan's gasket surface. http://lmgtfy.com/?q=roloc+3m+scotch+brite+wheel+mmm7486





Pulling the GSX motor (1080 HD)
I've done this video before. Not in HD, but this time I'm leaving you without an audio track to drown out what I'm doing. In previous videos I removed the transmission separately. Not this time. This is how you pick it out in one piece. No subtitles to read or block the view. Those of you looking for granular info about this video will find it here. In order to remove a 4g63 AWD drivetrain, you'll need to disconnect the following components... not necessarily in this order... and my car isn't exactly stock, but this is what you're after. Some things you can leave connected, especially if they're stock, but I removed them for safety reasons and because I routed some modified items differently. The timeline is listed here for your convenience. [off-camera] Remove the battery and support the car on jackstands. 1:14 Drain oil 1:20 Drain gear oil, ATF if you're an automatic. 1:28 remove radiator cap 1:31 Drain coolant 1:34 Remove radiator brackets, and coolant overflow system 1:40 Remove breather hoses. 1:42 Remove intake pipe 1:44 Remove throttle linkage bracket from intake manifold 1:50 Disconnect the fuel rail 1:54 Remove upper Intercooler pipe 1:58 Remove upper and lower radiator hoses 2:02 Remove coil-on-plug plate [if equipped] to prevent damage. 2:07 Remove cruise control motor [if equipped] for clearance 2:13 Remove catch can 2:15 Remove throttle linkage from throttle body 2:18 Remove the hood 2:25 un-bolt cruise control linkage box [if equipped] 2:29 un-bolt AC hose from fender 2:31 Remove power steering bracket (5 bolts and it free's up the pump*) *leave the pump connected. 2:40 Remove Dynatek ARC-2 ignition amplifier box [if equipped] 2:46 Un-plug injectors, cam angle sensor, crank angle sensor, AC harness, transistor pack, knock sensor, coil pack harness, TPS sensor, idle switch [if equipped], MAP sensor harness, o2 sensor harness, alternator connector, charge wire, oil pressure sensors, power steering switch and radiator fans 2:54 Remove power steering cooler brackets if they're in your way. 2:57 Remove radiator 3:00 Remove lowest coolant hose [in my case the turbo fitting] so the rest of the coolant will drain. 3:03 Remove coolant sensor wires and fan switch 3:06 Remove external oil cooler lines [if equipped] 3:16 Remove turbo oil feed line at lowest point so the rest of the oil drains. 3:20 Remove transmission linkage 3:25 Remove shifter cables from bracket 3:29 Remove clutch slave and zip-tie it so it doesn't come apart and leak. 3:36 Remove downpipe flange bolts and gasket 3:42 Remove wheels, and axles*. * Watch my transmission series for detailed info on this process if you get stuck. ** Put all the suspension stuff back together so you can put the car down. *** Put the washer and axle nuts back on the axles after removing them. 5:00 Loosen the alternator belt [and AC belt if equipped] 5:04 Remove the crank pulley for clearance 5:09 Remove the transfer case 5:27 Remove the starter bolts and stuff the starter out of your way*. *note the ground wire. 5:37 Remove the heater hoses 5:48 Attach your engine hoist brackets... DON'T LOSE THESE THINGS if you remove them like I do. 6:19 Protect your valve cover from damage with the chains and hoist. 6:31 Remove the three lower bracket bolts from the rear roll-stop mount 6:49 Remove all the bolts from the front roll-stop mount 6:54 Remove the lower crossmember and torque plate 7:06 Put the wheels back on and put the car on the ground. 7:25 Connect the hoist and put tension on it to support the engine's weight. 7:35 Remove the transmission mount 7:43 Remove the transmission mount bracket 7:46 Remove the reverse switch to prevent damaging it 7:52 Remove the timing-side engine mount. 8:03 Slightly lower the engine and remove the vacuum lines and brake Booster hose from the back of the intake manifold 8:12 Remove the ground wire from the back of the motor 8:17 Remove the last thing you overlooked. 8:30 Remove the engine and transmission in one piece. The crank pulley, transmission mount bracket, and reverse switch removal allows you more wiggle room without damaging either those parts or scratching up the chassis. The trans mount bracket loves to get caught on the passenger-side brake lines. The speed sensor is protected by the rear motor mount bracket, so you can leave it in place. I replaced my AC compressor during the transmission replacement, but never charged the system. If you have working AC, un-bolt the compressor and hang it from a bolt on the firewall using heavy-gauge wire. That way you don't have to evacuate the refrigerant and drive up the cost of repairing your car with an AC service, filter-drier and expansion tube. Don't let it hang from the lines because they can leak or even break.





Cylinder Head 104 - Remove Valves & Springs
Just one of many ways to remove valves from a cylinder head. I haven't seen a valve compressor like this one on YouTube yet. I know it's nobody makes them like this, because this one is a custom hack job specifically for 4g63 heads... but it's extremely effective and easy to use. Since I don't own a valve grinder, valve spring pressure testers (for installed height measurement), or valve seat grinding stones... there are several services I'm unable to perform myself. But since I can get the head disassembled to this state, it would be easier and cheaper for me to have them serviced by someone who does. Valve grinding machine time is cheaper if they don't have to tear down the head. You can lap them in yourself, but if the seat's in really bad shape, it will require attention to allow any of those efforts to be worthwhile. Valve seat grinding if necessary needs to be done with the proper tools, and if the seats must be replaced, then it can get expensive. Usually $20-ish a hole. Sometimes an oversized bore can be cut into a factory seat. I'm ordering a set of valves to see if that's possible.





Checking piston to block deck clearance.MP4
How to check the distance between the top of the piston and the cylinder block deck. This is an important measurement to make when building a custom engine.





Why so SIRIUS? Kia 4g64?
This video assumes you're aware that various iterations of the 4g series Mitsubishi engines are designated as Sirius I & II. For detailed information about which engines qualify as which, visit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitsubishi_Sirius_engine There's also this at EvolutionM: http://forums.evolutionm.net/evo-engine-turbo-drivetrain/278462-official-hyundai-2-4l-g4js -4g64-thread.html Good luck finding info about this using Hyundai and Kia in searches. Wikipedia doesn't have any info about it grouped with the Sonatas either. There is no question what this is, well illustrated in this video. I apologize for the length of this video, but a lot of ground is covered in a short time. Hopefully there's some information in here you may someday use. I'm just trying to expose it because there doesn't seem to be any real information floating around in the forums about this yet. The car is a first-generation 1999-2005 Kia Optima sedan. It has the EVO equivalent of a 4g64 2.4L. Before using any of these parts, do your research, cross-reference your parts and know what you're getting into. Using parts from this rotating assembly in a 2g Eclipse will require aftermarket rods and/or custom pistons. This is information for those who wish to frankenstein their builds, or save a buck... whichever.... either one of those requires skill.





Block Preparation Part 2 - 1gina2g Timing Side
RRE Method: http://www.roadraceengineering.com/2g6boltmotorinstall.htm Magnus Method: http://magnusmotorsports.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/1gina2g.pdf Technically, I'm doing the Magnus method, but my wiring will be very different. All 1g cars use the same water pump, and naturally they use the same water pump bolts as well. I use the 1g tensioner arm because it clears the water pump without any grinding of either one of those parts. 1g Water Pump MD972052 1g Water Pump Bolts MF140022 MF140026 MF140028 MF140029 MF140238 1g Timing Tensioner Arm MD130032 This 2g timing mount assembly includes a tensioner arm, washer, pivot bolt, idler pulley and bolt.. You won't need the included tensioner arm with my method. It doesn't come with the studs on the top, so you'd need to buy a pair of those. Complete 2g Timing Mount Assembly MD189172 Engine Mount Studs MD184155 x2 Depending on whether you're installing a 1g 6-bolt or a 1g 7-bolt engine block in your 2g chassis, you're going to need the front case and hydraulic tensioner that matches the block you're using. Front Case Assemblies MD129347 (6-bolt straight cut gears) MD175762 (6-bolt helical cut gears) MD327450 (7-bolt helical for 1g block) 1g Hydraulic Tensioner MD164533 6-bolt MD308586 7-bolt 1g Hydraulic Tensioner Bolts MD129350 x2 6-bolt MD190987 x2 7-bolt You can modify a 2g lower timing cover to make it fit, but it won't line up around the bottom of the front case. That's why I use the 1g timing cover, and modify it to fit the 2g middle cover. Since you need metal covers against the block to have something to bolt the plastic parts to, let's start with those. The rear metal cover that bolts to the head is exactly the same part for both 1g and 2g cars. With my method, you need to use the 2g front metal cover in order to line up with the 2g middle plastic cover. So all of the plates that bolt to my swap are from a 2g. 1g2g Timing Middle Cover, Rear (metal) MD127142 2g Timing Middle Cover, Front (metal) MD187283 2g Timing Lower Cover, Rear (metal) MD199941 For the plastic part of the covers, my method dictates that you use the 1g lower timing cover assembly. This lines up all of the bolt holes and makes it fit around the bottom of the front case where the oil pan is. If you modify the lower cover to fit with the middle 2g cover, you won't need to trim anything else. The upper timing cover you need may depend on which head and valve cover you're using. Lower Timing Cover Assembly MD141454 1g 6-bolt block MD193995 1g 7-bolt block 2g Middle Timing Cover Assembly MD191811 - 9401.1-9606.3 MD191807 - 9607.1-9912.9 Upper Timing Cover WITH Rubber Gaskets 1g - MD141457 6-bolt head 1g - MD188127 7-bolt head 2g - MD198031 This is a good place to transition into the rubber parts because the rubber pieces are very different for the 1g and 2g upper timing covers. If you don't want a rattling, buzzing, noisy valve cover sounding off with every vibration from your car, you should replace all of the rubber. It dry rots and turns hard. If you bought a complete 1g engine gasket set and you have both timing covers already, then you should have the 1g portion of these rubber gaskets included in your gasket set. If you've already got both generations of the timing covers like I do, and no good rubber gaskets, then order all of these parts and stop the rattles. However, if you bought any of the plastic timing cover parts new from the dealer, then those plastic parts come with the rubber gaskets included. You can eliminate them from your order. MD006665 1g* MD156770 1g* MD188122 2g MD188831 2g MD191502 2g * If you bought a complete 1g plastic lower timing cover, you don't need the 1g gaskets. Upper Timing Cover Gaskets by themselves... 1g - MD031235 & MD122058 6-bolt head 1g - MD188123 & MD188124 7-bolt head 2g - MD188122 Now for the last part. Fasteners. These are all of the upper, middle and lower timing cover bolts whether they bolt down metal or plastic parts. I've included their lengths and diameters so you can identify them. All Timing Cover Bolts MF140216 x1 6x45 (middle cover) MF140202 x4 6x10 MF140206 x9 6x18 MF140209 x2 6x25 MF140210 x2 6x28 MF247868 x2 6x25 MD131417 x2 6x16





Trans & Clutch 4 - Installing The Clutch
What you wanted to know about clutches but were afraid to ask. I'm putting a ACT MB1-XTSS on the car in this video. Step height, clutch dowell pins, bolt part numbers, alignment and various clutch parts are described in this video. It's part of an all-inclusive drivetrain tech piece I'm working on that's broken up into sections to maintain focus on the individual processes involved.




Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?





Similar 1/4 mile timeslips to browse:

1956 Chevrolet Pickup : 9.000 @ 149.000
Al Lyda, Engine: Chev 565 CI, Tires: goodyear


1980 Dodge Mirada : 10.984 @ 122.290
Todd LaMothe (Bubba), Engine: 440, Tires: MT ET Streets


1951 Chevrolet Pickup Step Side: 11.265 @ 114.670
Mark Acton, Engine: 350 chevy, Supercharger: no Turbos: no Tires: MT 33-15-15 rear


1976 Jaguar XJ6 4.2 Executive: 11.332 @ 124.000
Vasish, Engine: 4.2 straight 6, Supercharger: Rob Green Screw Type Turbos: - Tires: Mickey Thompson slicks


1999 Chevrolet Pickup : 11.359 @ 117.070
Moze Collins, Engine: 6.0l, Supercharger: N/A Turbos: 82mm Tires: Continental Cross Contact UHP


1995 Buell S2 : 11.370 @ 120.930
B. Morvant,


2002 Chevrolet Pickup Silverado: 11.478 @ 118.960
C.J. Quinton, Engine: 408, Supercharger: Procharger D1SC Tires: Yokohama


1950 Chevrolet Pickup 3100: 11.602 @ 114.910
Ron Plender, Engine: 292 CID inline 6 cylinder,


1950 Chevrolet Pickup 3100: 11.720 @ 113.110
Ron Plender, Engine: 292 CID inline 6 cylinder, Tires: MT 29.5 X 9


1993 Toyota Pickup : 11.800 @ 120.000
Dave G, Engine: LC Engineering Stage Five, Turbos: Turbonetics 60-1 Tires: Mickey Thomspon Et streets 28x11.50x15


1979 Chevrolet Pickup C-10: 12.210 @ 118.750
R. Cook, Engine: 350, Tires: goodyear 15 x 13.5


1994 Toyota Pickup : 12.347 @ 112.260
Nestor D. Cotto Perez, Engine: 22re, Turbos: hybrid Tires: Mickey Thompson Competitor street


1983 Dodge Mirada : 12.473 @ 105.820
Patrick Rall, Engine: 1969 Plymouth 340, .040 over, Tires: hoosier Quick Time Pro 26x12.5x15


1968 Chevrolet Pickup : 12.530 @ 103.860
Brad Armstrong, Engine: 383,


2000 Chevrolet Pickup Silverado: 12.580 @ 111.000
Jonathan Selman, Engine: 2004 LQ4, Supercharger: - Turbos: STS Tires: Toyos on Front/ 28x10-16 Hoosiers Rear


1969 Chevrolet Pickup C-10: 12.600 @ 115.000
Brett, Engine: TPI 383, Supercharger: Paxton Tires: 295/75R15


1970 Chevrolet Pickup CS-10 truck: 12.603 @ 109.000
Nick Houghton, Engine: 383 stroker, Tires: 295/50/15 Street tires


1970 Chevrolet Pickup C-10: 13.040 @ 104.700
Andy Lagasse, Engine: 383 sbc, Tires: BFG 30x9.50 frt, M/T 30x13.50 rr


1984 Chevrolet Pickup Fleetside SWB: 13.380 @ 100.670
Todd Stinson, Engine: 400 sb, Tires: Hoosier 10x26x15


1978 Chevrolet Pickup C10: 13.410 @ 108.450
SS, Engine: 305 Ci, Tires: bfg radial T/A


 


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