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Blueprint 102 - Measuring 4g63 Crankshaft Endplay

4g63's are famous for hosing crankshaft thrust bearings. This video illustrates the process of how to check the thrust bearing clearance whether the motor's in the car or not. Of course in my case the motor's on a stand for this video. Lucky for me! In cases where the engine is still in the car, the same procedures can be used so long as the indicator is attached to the engine block. The plunger can be set up touching either the inside of the crank pulley or by removing the clutch cover plate and contacting the flywheel. What the thrust bearing does, is prevent the crankshaft from having lateral movement in the main bearings. If a crankshaft develops excessive movement here, clutch engagement and hydraulic problems will begin showing up, followed shortly thereafter by catastrophic failure of main bearings, rod bearings, connecting rod failures, oil pressure problems, or even broken blocks, crankshafts and rods in extreme cases. It's important that every 4g63 turbo engine is within spec on this measurement. When the crankshaft aggressively wears through the thrust bearing developing lateral play, this is called "crankwalk". On some block castings, replacing the bearings will NOT fix the problem. An engine block that is prone to crankwalking can not be fixed. The only option in these cases is to replace the shortblock and rotating assembly with new or used parts that are stronger than the one you've unfortunately encountered. For the 2g guys, the best option for repairing this problem is to remove the 7-bolt turbo shortblock your car came with and replace it with a 6-bolt from a 89-92.5 production date turbo DSM. Non-turbo blocks CAN be used; however, the block will not have oil squirters that aim towards the back of the pistons. That stream of oil aides lubrication to the wrist pins, cylinder bores, and somewhat cools the pistons. All good things on a turbo setup. Aside from that difference, there are no other differences between the non-turbo and turbo blocks. The pistons and thus the compression ratios are different, but that's it. Oil squirters can be machined into the main galleries of a non-turbo block, but it's more trouble than it's worth unless you can't find a turbo block. There are tons of differing theories about what causes crankwalk. Nearly all of them are plausible and logical arguments. I will not get into those debates in this video in order to focus on procedures for testing and replacement. Please feel free to google "crankwalk 4g63" and read the volumes of information available already. The arguments and gathered data are older than the Eclipse itself and in abundant supply on the internets. Magnus, RRE, VFAQ, and many other parts vendors have lengthy write-ups on their own research and development. The bottom line is that the 6-bolt shortblocks are LESS likely to suffer from this. Next time you see someone with a video that looks like it was shot with a potato asking "does this sound like crankwalk", you can send them this video. There's a reason for every noise, rather than focus on the sound, focus on eliminating the real problem. KNOW if it's out of spec.


 


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Hyundai Elantra 4g63 Shortblock Assembly
HOLD ON TIGHT! HERE WE GO! We begin the blueprint and assembly on my 1992 Hyundai Elantra's bastardized 4g63. The parts used in this are from a mash of different brands and models outside of the typical 2.0L 4g63, but the specs and standards I am following for its assembly are for the 2.0L DOHC. If you want to follow along in your service manual to verify what I've done here in this video, the processes we cover here detail pages 11C-95 through 11C-105 of the 1g Overhaul manual. I would prefer you not rip them from the binding and throw them away, relying only on this video for instruction... but rather use this video as a motivational guide, and as a demonstration of the techniques involved in those sections. You gotta do the cooking by the book. I never had any intention of making instructional videos on this particular car, but after it blew up I slowly realized it's actually a better case study for how a 4g63 ticks than anything else in my driveway. There are several reasons for this. One being that it's a mix of parts that shouldn't be bolted together, and the other is that many of you watching my videos aren't trying to build a 600hp engine out of aftermarket parts. You're trying to put back together what used to be your daily driver. This car covers those bases. Don't think for a second I won't go through this same trouble and level of detail for the GSX. I will. When I do, having this information in this video will give you a better understanding on how and why I do things the way I do when I get there. This was the shortest I could condense this video. I've never uploaded a video this long, and I hope I never have to do it again. It took a month to create on cutting-edge equipment, 16 hours to export, and 9 hours for YouTube to process. My script for the voiceover is 6 times longer than the whole script for the movie Pootie Tang. 6 times. Longer. Than a Hollywood movie.





Cylinder Head 205 - Degree 4g63 Camshafts
This video is all about establishing your valve timing baseline, and adjusting your camshafts to the manufacturer's spec. It's only ONE of several steps that should be performed when you're assembling your engine on an engine stand. Establishing these conditions with accuracy while your engine installed in the car is a near-impossibility, and the reason why... is demonstrated in this video. There are several challenges to overcome when performing these procedures on a 4gxx series Mitsubishi engine, and they're all defeated here. The cylinder head used in this video is a J1 spec '92 Hyundai Elantra small-combustion chamber head which has had several valve jobs and has been resurfaced multiple times by budget engine remanufacturers who didn't care about quality control, as well as performance shops who do. It has had no less than .040" removed from the head gasket surface, the valves are recessed because of all the valve jobs performed, and at some point when it was cut, it wasn't level. Removing material from the deck surface will change the installed camshaft centerline, and that will change your engine's valve timing events even if all other parts remain the same. I would claim this is a multi-part video except that I've got the videos broken up by topic already, and this one is all about setting your cams to the manufacturer's specification. It is not the end of testing that will be performed with these tools. The basics concerning the process and tool fabrication are covered here. Further discussion on this topic concerning the effects of advancing or retarding camshafts from spec, and for checking your valve clearance will be in the videos that follow. I had to end this video after the manufacturer's spec was achieved to make it easier to digest, and because it would have created a video greater than one hour in length despite the break-neck speeds that things happen here on Jafromobile. Where your cams are set determine how the swept volume of the combustion chamber gets used. The information on the manufacturer's spec sheet is their recommendation for baseline settings that will help you get the most out of those camshafts. Whether or not your engine can operate with those specifications without additional hardware or without causing a catastrophic failure will be expanded upon in Cylinder Head 206. The next video should be used as a companion to this video because establishing the manufacturer's baseline is not the end of the assembly or testing process. It's only half the battle. Should you be lucky enough to find your combination of parts allow your camshafts to fit and requires no additional adjustment after assembly, the steps in this video and in Cylinder Head 206 should still be performed if you are doing the assembly yourself. Failure to inspect these variables may lead to a tuning nightmare once the engine is back in the car, hard starts, or worse... bent valves and damaged wrist pins. Making these tools and performing these steps will give you the peace of mind to know with certainty that your engine is operating safely at its peak performance.





Turbo Elantra Bearing Failure Diagnosis
I had time to look at this thing up close. Go through the oil system, and check out all the bearings. Looks like another good study for my oil system series because it's the opposite problem that my GSX experienced. High oil pressure can be remedied a number of ways, but left unchecked can actually take a toll on your bearings. The way your engine bearings work, the parts they suspend are supported only by an oil film layer, and flow needs to be right in order for it to work as an actual bearing. If the oil supply is insufficient, then it loses the ability to suspend the part causing it to crash into the bearing surface. If oil flow is too great, friction is increased, the flow becomes turbulent, and the oil film doesn't form properly. High oil pressure can float and spin rod bearings, and that's worst-case scenario. I had several un-favorable conditions going on inside this engine and that makes it a little bit difficult to link what my engine experienced to any one singular thing. I think it's easier to look at it like some sort of perfect storm. From sub-standard parts for how the engine components would be used, to oil pressure, to part fatigue, to part history to abuse... this thing's got a little bit of everything working against it and that's why it's such a hilarious car. It was given to me with one condition. "See what this thing will do, and see how long it goes before it breaks." My take on it is, the parts are still less than ideal, and they've still got life left in them. It's worth fixing. These parts are worthless as a race motor, and normally I'd have junked 'em, but it's the Hyundai.





Cylinder Head 204 - Porting & Polishing
This is a first-generation 1992 1.6L Hyundai Elantra small-combustion-chamber head. Thats what it is. It's a J1 engine's cylinder head. In Cylinder Head 106 I talked about the mainstream porting theories as they are discussed. We looked at a cylinder head that I have thousands of dollars of professional work performed on, and a bone-stock second-generation head that I didn't port. In this video I just might do something you haven't seen done before. For some, that may be uncomfortable. The port and polish job I perform here is what I think will work best for my current build. This is not an extreme killer port job. What will be different here is where port textures are concerned, I will be following the advice of a reputable source that will remain un-named. You're free to port yours differently than I do in this video, and I give you that out, around the 20 minute marker. The Hyundai is far from being an ultimate-performance build. It's a $400 box of scraps with nothing but time invested. It's perfect for this video. My finished product WILL be an improvement over what I had. I don't yet have access to a flow bench. I still have an achievement to un-lock. As far as you should be concerned with the techniques I employ... without flow numbers there is no evidence of what this will do, but we will gather lots of info from dynp sessions and drag strip time slips. If I could test it on a flow bench, I would. There are MANY, and when I say many, I mean thousands of flame war mongering pirates floating around on rough seas with a hair trigger cannon finger itching to fire if you port a head any differently than what the herd mentality says to do while porting a cylinder head. I cover the herd mentality because it has merit. It's been tested. Tried and true. But I don't follow it to the letter of the law. I'm definitely not here to de-bunk it. I would port a cylinder head differently for each build based on how that engine was used. There's an extremely valid reason why relating to air speed. It's not the texture of a port that maximizes the effect of fuel atomization, but the velocity of the air running through an x or y sized valve. The driving factor in this is the piston speed. I'm not going to give you the technical information, but will refer you to information about the Lovell factor. There's a better description of this in the links below, and even a calculator to help you find your engine's sweet spot. Why the Lovell factor is important: https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/3346/the-effect-of-valve-size Lovell gas factor calculator: http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/lovellgascalc.html Only people who have flow testing equipment know for sure what really works and have the capability to produce a perfectly-matched port job for the ultimate performance build. Those guys know the definition of ultimate, and THEY are floating below the water Aegis-class submarines ready to blow your comment up if you don't know what you're talking about. They don't care if you're an armchair mechanic or a herd of pirates. I will say, they're zoomed in pretty close on me right now, and I'm expecting to take a few hits. My work will be tested based on Dyno and drag strip performance, and the results will be posted here. Fortunately, those kinds of videos are a WHOLE LOT EASIER TO MAKE!!!





Block Preparation Part 1
Preparation for powder coating and Glyptal application. Audio track is an original performance by Rojo Del Chocolate. My block is being powder coated rather than painted. It's just something I do. The GSX had it on the last block so it's getting it again. Since the tools are so similar and the mess is the same, I'm going ahead and preparing it for the Glyptal application as well. These 2 coatings will require being baked separately. The powder coating is baked on at a hotter temperature than the Glyptal, so it's going first. The surface preparation instructions for Glyptal is as follows: Surface to be painted should be dry and free from dirt, wax, grease, rust and oil. Remove all grease and oil by washing surface with mineral spirits. Wipe or scrape off all loose dirt, rust or scale. The last sentence is what's covered in this video. The 2nd sentence happens next (although it's already degreased), and I'll get it back from powder coat with it in the state described in sentence #1 completed. If following these instructions to the letter of the law. Second and third opinions in... the main journal is fine. You'll notice that I didn't coat the main caps, or "suitcase handles". I'm not going to. You bang around on these installing and removing them, and I don't want to risk chipping them once they're coated. They're below the windage area, and there will also be an un-coated main bearing girdle down there. This video covered 25 hours of actual work. Yes, I kept changing into the same filthy clothes every shoot because I wanted it to look consistent. You have to take your time doing this kind of work, and be VERY VERY CAREFUL! If for some reason you're crazy enough to attempt what I do in this video, you do so at your own risk. This is an elective treatment that I've never done, but I am by no means the first person to do it. I'm learning about it just like the rest of you.





Calculate Your Compression Ratio
This is everything you need to do to calculate your compression ratio. No foolin'. Every equation and process demonstrated. Find all your variables. Know your exact compression ratio in every cylinder. This is how you do it. Just because your service manual says your car is 7.8:1 or 8.5:1 compression doesn't mean that it is. Whenever there are casting irregularities, variations in piston height, parts that have been machined, non-OE parts, or changes to your head gasket selection, your compression ratio WILL change. It's highly probable that you're only CLOSE to spec if you've never touched your engine at all since it was "born", and that it doesn't MATCH spec. Even if it did, how would you know? This. 5 variables. V1 Swept Volume V2 Deck Volume V3 Piston-to-deck clearance V4 Piston dish cc's V5 Head combustion chamber cc's The ratio math: V1+V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at BDC V2+V3+V4+V5 = volume of combustion chamber at TDC The ratio is... (V1+V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) : (V2+V3+V4+V5) ÷ (V2+V3+V4+V5) or BDC ÷ TDC : TDC ÷ TDC First you fill in the variables, then you calculate volumes, then you add the volumes, then you reduce the ratio (fraction). It's that easy. Here are your magic numbers: 0.7854 = Pi quartered to the ten thousandth 16.387 = number of cc's in a cubic inch. If you divide any number in cc's by 16.387 it gives you inches. If you multiply any number in cubic inches by 16.387 it gives you cc's. Quartering pi lets you use the calculation: BORE x BORE x STROKE x .7854 = volume of a cylinder instead of... π x (BORE ÷ 2) x (BORE ÷ 2) x STROKE = volume of a cylinder Either way is right. You get the same result if you calculate pi to the ten thousandth. While I apologize for all the math, no I don't. I'm really not sorry. You actually clicked here for it whether you realize it or not. This is ALL the math, the tests, and the whole process to calculate your cylinder volumes and compression individually even if you don't know any of your variables yet. All of my numbers are present for those who want to calculate out the last 3 cylinders out of curiosity just to see how it affects cylinder volumes and compression ratios from one cylinder to the next. Why would I do that for you? Why would I deprive you of that practice? Just assume that all 4 of my combustion chambers are 41.75 ml if you do this. Clicking like share and subscribe helps a channel grow. It also motivates me. Don't sweat the camera. It's enough to know that so many of you care about what I'm doing here. From the bottom of my atmospheric dump, I thank you all! This gift horse's teeth are all over the place, but he sometimes poops gold nuggets. PS: Use ATF for your piston dish volume tests, not alcohol. Of course it's better just to use the spec sheet included with your pistons... but not everyone gets that luxury. Water is just fine for head combustion chamber tests. Dry and re-oil all parts that water touches.





Blueprint 104 - The Crankshaft
It's important to know what you've got even before dealing with the machinist. If you want to inspect a crankshaft, this is how you do it. I detail the process of removing the crank and what to measure. All specifications in this video are illustrated with a 6-bolt 4g63 turbo block, but are all actually the same for 7-bolt engines with the exception of the rod widths.





Why so SIRIUS? Kia 4g64?
This video assumes you're aware that various iterations of the 4g series Mitsubishi engines are designated as Sirius I & II. For detailed information about which engines qualify as which, visit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitsubishi_Sirius_engine There's also this at EvolutionM: http://forums.evolutionm.net/evo-engine-turbo-drivetrain/278462-official-hyundai-2-4l-g4js -4g64-thread.html Good luck finding info about this using Hyundai and Kia in searches. Wikipedia doesn't have any info about it grouped with the Sonatas either. There is no question what this is, well illustrated in this video. I apologize for the length of this video, but a lot of ground is covered in a short time. Hopefully there's some information in here you may someday use. I'm just trying to expose it because there doesn't seem to be any real information floating around in the forums about this yet. The car is a first-generation 1999-2005 Kia Optima sedan. It has the EVO equivalent of a 4g64 2.4L. Before using any of these parts, do your research, cross-reference your parts and know what you're getting into. Using parts from this rotating assembly in a 2g Eclipse will require aftermarket rods and/or custom pistons. This is information for those who wish to frankenstein their builds, or save a buck... whichever.... either one of those requires skill.





Reading a Standard Micrometer.mp4
This video continues the series on using precision measuring tools that are used by the mechanic. The detailed video uses closeup video to show hoe standard micrometers are used.





Cylinder Head 203 - Valve & Spring Installation
There are 2 critical values in getting your valvetrain geometry correct. Valve install height and spring install height. On some models of cylinder heads, getting these values is easier than it is on a 4g63 cylinder head. On the first Glyptal video, you heard me complain about the complexity of the casting and how hard it was to reach all the nooks and crannies while applying that coating. The casting is very complex on a 4g63 head. There are hydraulic galleries for the lifters elevated above the valvetrain surface which make accessing each valve bore with precision measurement tools very difficult. It's because of this that you need to do some math to get these values correct. Stuart is going to show you the process for obtaining the stem height and spring height values on a 4g63 head. Using these numbers you can determine other work necessary to correct the spring height value to correct seat pressure, and ensure you have adequate valve travel for your springs to work correctly. It looks like rocket surgery, but really it's pretty simple. The ultimate goal is to get every valve spring in as close proximity to one another as you can, while doing your best to nail the recommended specification PROVIDED BY THE VALVE SPRING MANUFACTURER. Loose valve springs can result in leaky valve seats, valve bounce and deflection that will drastically shorten the life of the valvetrain. If valve bounce is severe, it can cause engine-killing interference with the pistons Tight valve springs can cause excessive valvetrain vibration generated by the force necessary for the camshafts to push them open. On the narrow side of the spectrum this can increase friction on the cams which can wipe lobes and shorten their lifespan, and on the severe end in not only increases the likelihood of wiping a cam lobe, it can lead to binding valve springs and crashing the valvetrain. You have to hit the sweet spot. Valve springs specifications include several variables that help you achieve these goals. The manufacturer rates their springs for their installed pressure and height. They have a compression limit referred to as valve spring bind which tells you how far you can compress them from their installed height before the coils begin to bind and the spring stops compressing. The valve springs used in this video are rated at 97lbs @ 1.440" installed, and .500" lift. This means they should bind at .940", but my cams will only generate .433" lift, giving me plenty of head room at the top (.067") to prevent binding if they are installed correctly. One thing we found which I wasn't expecting is they're a little on the stiff side of spec. We measured 100lbs at 1.452", so rather than risk setting them up too tight, that's where we set our tight specification. This decision was made because if the rated pressure is lower than our actual measurements, this would in theory decrease the lift specification and increase the possibility of binding. Our install pressure ended up still higher than spec with a barely-larger-than-spec spring installed height. I don't consider this a defect. It is close enough within the margin of error that it shouldn't cause any problems, and anyone doing this job right will measure and check all of these specifications to ensure these parts are what they say they are. That's what you watched us do. I'm confident that this will work because the 4g63 utilizes a hydraulic self-adjusting valvetrain. If the stem height is too high, it can be reduced by grinding the ends of the valve stems to shorten them. This will have no affect on spring installed height when the parts are assembled, however; it will change the amount on paper that you'd need to subtract from the stem height in order to accurately calculate spring installed height. If any of the valves have been ground to shorten their stem height, all of the valves should be measured separately with their retainers and keepers assembled, and that new value subtracted from stem height individually to obtain each spring installed height. You can't reduce this value any other way short of replacing the valve seat. If the valve stem height is too low, you can modify the valve seat or machine the valve spring perches (seat or retainer) to increase the size of the spring installed height. Another method would be to cut the valve seat deeper to recess the valve. In my video, we show this whole process on a brand new set of Supertech valves. All of them are identical, and all of the retainers are new and identical. Because of this (and yes we checked it), and because no valves required any grinding, we only needed to use one value in our math for all 16 valves. Hopefully this video clears up the process and covers the options available for making changes if they're necessary. If you land within 3% of spec, you've done your diligence in achieving correct valvetrain geometry.





Trans & Clutch 4 - Installing The Clutch
What you wanted to know about clutches but were afraid to ask. I'm putting a ACT MB1-XTSS on the car in this video. Step height, clutch dowell pins, bolt part numbers, alignment and various clutch parts are described in this video. It's part of an all-inclusive drivetrain tech piece I'm working on that's broken up into sections to maintain focus on the individual processes involved.





How To Check Piston Ring End Gap.MP4
Piston ring end gap is and important measurement to verify during engine assembly. Do this to ensure that the ring ends won't butt during engine operation and damage the cylinders. Also keeps cylinder pressures more consistent from bore to bore which means better effiiciency and power.





How To 4G63 RWD EVO
Me and my buddy Pisarski decided to convert our eve's rwd, now this rwd mod is completely reversible so enjoy, any questions likes would be greatly appreciated thanks guys why rwd? well my reason - better fuel economy - more fun = burnouts and drifting - DRIFTING :D - being able to tow my car with a two wheel dolly - i only drive my evo in the summer so rwd is all i need, plus i can make it AWD with only some new drive axles and putting back the stock viscous coupler so not really bad, so enjoy! Song 1 "beeKoo mix" by Lasswell http://ccmixter.org/files/lazztunes07/12238 is licensed under a Creative Commons license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Song 2 Zorba The Remix - Slamboree A remix so ya Song 3 Mimosa - LDOESIT & CATCHER BLOCK Enjoy Talk Time Productions :D Proudly supported by Local Cloathing





6-bolt 4g63 shortblock rebuild parts
I'm saying it right up front. This video goes above and beyond shortblock rebuild parts for a reason. Read on... The first part is stern, the last part is happy. Nobody in their right, left, forward or reverse minds puts a 23-year-old 4g63 engine back together with 100% OEM parts. Nobody's shooting for that good ol' stock 190hp feeling with a DSM drivetrain. Nobody. Not unless they've got something to prove. I am putting a 7-bolt head on a 6-bolt block. So with that said, I show several over-the-top internal parts that are and are not related to the short block itself. I show cams and valve springs which only matter for head work. Not part of the short block. Nobody makes an engine gasket kit with all the parts mixed and matched to do this. So what people have to do is order both kits, or order all the individual parts separately like I am doing here. It's at this stage you are working with a machine shop to return your old worn-out block to the specs you've chosen to follow, and you need these cylinder head parts at this stage of the game to do it right. These parts making an appearance in this video show 3 things... 1) I am not aiming for a stock build 2) Now is the time to have your cam and valve springs if you're going to make any changes to the head. 3) these gaskets, seals, pins, bolts and bearings are things you will need no matter what it is you're building if it's a 6-bolt block. When I do the head series, I will be showing modifications and parts to rebuild and make a 7-bolt head fit a 6-bolt block. This video assumes you disassembled a running or freshly-broken engine and that YOU HAVE ALL THE BOLTS, NUTS, WASHERS, and HARD PARTS of the motor that it needs, bagged and tagged like was demonstrated in the "Crankwalked?" video. You've watched me clean and inspect valves, lifters, rockers, crankshafts, rods, etc. I don't need my turbo, hoses, vacuum lines or anything like that yet, and they likely won't be for a MHI turbo anyway. This video focuses on the gaskets, seals, bearings, consumable and disposable parts that you should replace for the shortblock only. My old trusty 6-bolt front case is coming up in a future video, getting refurbished and rebuilt, and ssembling a shortblock doesn't require having timing components yet. The head gasket will probably get its very own video just like the front case. As you can see, I have very big plans with this upcoming series. We've hit the 200's on engine stuff. It's a milestone. For you 7-bolt guys... bah! I know this is all 6-bolt part numbers. Some parts are interchangeable but I didn't make it clear which ones are in this video. Don't worry, you will need these part numbers eventually (I hope that was a joke). But if you wait long enough, perhaps I'll be re-assembling a 7-bolt again? Here comes the first bit of good news... The reason the "Crankwalked?" video had a question mark in the title is because I wanted to see others' comments about it. Gain a consensus. There are so many different opinions about shortblock failures on the 2g cars that I didn't want to take sides with such an entertaining video. But it's not crankwalked. What you see is rod bearing failure as a result of torsional stress on the crankshaft. It was caused by a catastrophic clutch failure. The thrust bearing was .014", and crankwalk cars that fail from crankwalk are usually around .075"-.150". My thrust bearing was beat to death as my old 6-puck fragged. All the fail was initiated by the drivetrain, and the drivetrain problem was a fail by yours truly that had repeated several times prior to me making videos about it and getting it right. It's my fault for not catching it, but when I discovered it, the drivetrain series was born. So my 7-bolt crank is trashed, but the mains are fine. New bearings and a crank would fix its thrust measurements and I may just rebuild it for the sake of a video someday. Now comes the really good news. My brother is working with me to build a website. There will be tech links and things that simply can't be delivered on YouTube. Not in a practical and effective way anyway. Things like schedules, projects and mod lists, parts lists, bolt lists, torque specifications, printable worksheets for blueprinting, the parts I used to make my fuel injector cleaner... stuff my viewers need or ask for. Soon you'll know where to find it. I need to learn how to maintain it, but I'm a good student. Still, these things take time, and I haven't yet wrapped my own brain around its potential. I'm putting it out there for you guys because you deserve it. I'm simply astonished at how the channel has grown, and I feel the need to give back.





Hyundai 4g63 Assembly Part 3
I have bad news. The big camera's playback heads bit the dust from extensive prolonged use. I wore out the tape drive. No manner of cleaning tapes can fix what it's been through. I've talked many times about how much footage goes into one of my 15 to 30 minute videos, and for every hour of video footage I've shot, the camera does double-duty because after shooting, it has to be played back in real time during capture. I've done more than 130 videos this way, probably over 2000 hours of use in the harshest of environments, and it just couldn't handle it any longer. I shot several more tapes beyond what's in this video that I can't even import because the play heads failed. I don't know if any of that video even stuck to the tapes? The lost footage from the last video was an early and un-recognized sign of what was soon to come. I know I joked about it, but in reality it's really not very funny at all. I can't afford a backup for a piece of equipment like this, so it's something I don't have. As bad as this news might feel to you, I feel it 21,000 times over and I mean that. This couldn't come at a worse time and expense for me, and at a point where my production was really starting to wrap up on this project to move on to bigger and better things. It's the only camera I have that can do what I do here on this channel, so I'm forced to stop production for now. Even though my camera is huge, 7 year old HDV technology, these things still sell for several thousand dollars used because they record un-compressed video unlike every other flash storage based solution available at twice the price. 3CCD 1080/60i HD cameras that shoot to tape have advantages that you can't affordably achieve with solid-state media. I have to use un-compressed footage to do what I do here or else there's nothing left of the video quality after 7 exports and a final mpeg compression. The Sony Action Cam can't do it, we learned that in a previous test video. Even if it could, it can't do close-ups and everything's fisheyed. Buying a low-end 4K camera is impractical because I can't efficiently or effectively edit that video without a $9,000 computer. Jafromobile is just not that big of a channel, and I do this completely un-sponsored and at my own expense with the help of a handful of friends who volunteer their talent, time and information. It's the epitome of low-budget and what it earns still doesn't come close covering the channel's equipment and expenses as they occur. People have urged that I do a kickstarter, but I can't bring myself to ask for that from the community. I don't sell a product or offer services so there is no profit margin. I can't accept money for something that happens only at the speed of my available resources. To me, this channel is my proverbial gift horse to all of you. http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/don't_look_a_gift_horse_in_the_mouth I know what you're thinking and I realize this is a grim conclusion to this video. It sounds like I'm down for the count, but don't rush to the down vote button just yet. As of the upload date of this video, I'm paying out of pocket to fix a ridiculously expensive 3CCD 1080HD broadcast quality video camera so that these projects can resume, and so that I can bring the final assembly steps to you in the same quality you've grown used to seeing here on Jafromobile. If I wear out a camera every 3 years, then so be it. This is love, and no expense is too great. The big camera is being fixed by its manufacturer, and I'm expecting the repair to cost as much as replacing it. I sincerely hope that's not the case. Hopefully my production only has to take a short break. Once production resumes and I can import these tapes, I've got some really awesome stuff coming up and I hope every last one of you is here to see it. I may have a few other backlogged nuggets I can upload, and as always I'm happy to discuss this in the comments and provide updates on the repair as I get them. Update: Awaiting quote due by 5/16 according to the repair agreement. 5/9/2014 9:17:00 AM DELIVERED NEWPORT NEWS, VA US 5/9/2014 5:36:00 AM DESTINATION SCAN NEWPORT NEWS, VA US 5/9/2014 12:04:00 AM ARRIVAL SCAN NEWPORT NEWS, VA US 5/12/2014 - Repair paid in full $440. Far less than I was expecting. I'm glad they still make parts for 7 year old professional equipment. Thank You Canon, USA! Repair should be complete within 7 business days from receipt of payment. The quote only took them 24 hours and they quoted a week just for the estimate, so at this rate I should be back up and running once again very soon. Thank ALL of you for your kind words, HUGE generosity, and all of the moral support. I swear I have the best subscribers on YouTube!




Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?





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