Drag Racing 1/4 Mile times 0-60 Dyno Fast Cars Muscle Cars

Jamie's 92 Hyundai Elantra with bastard 4g63 swap

There's a history both behind this car, and the friendship with this person. I met him 10 years ago following a random conversation that I injected myself into between 2 strangers at an auto parts store. I had just bought a '92 Civic CX with crap compression and was picking up some service parts to keep it limping and useful while I built my DSM. I overheard him mention "4g63" to somebody as I walked by, so I turned around and introduced myself without any clue that he was one of the "realest" people I've ever known. What occurred for me in the following discussion was an awakening on my part. He led me to an adjacent parking lot where an un-assuming Hyundai Elantra sat. This isn't the one, but is one of many factory cars that he's swapped a 4g63 into. What he managed to get through my big thick skull was there were lots of great inconspicuous chassis that you can simply bolt a 4g63 into. Over time it became evident where you can find lots of "racing" parts, from factory equipment on various mini-vans, station wagons, much of the Hyundai line-up from '92-'95. During the "DSM Years", there were plenty of cars from other manufacturers that made dynamite donors, and this sparked my ability to be frugal in some of my ventures. If you ever meet Jamie, expect his knowledge of car parts both inside and outside the realm of Mitsubishi to be as unassuming on the surface as the car in this video. He has true talent. Finds peace and happiness in a junkyard full of decay, and skills that create useful high-performance art from what many consider rubbish. Because he's already taken time walking around with parts from one car and bolting them on to others to see if they'll fit, worked as a machinist's apprentice rebuilding everything under the sun, and done the tech work to analyze failures in all of it, he's often my go-to guy for advice when things aren't working correctly. Many times he's come through for me in a pinch and shed light on something I didn't understand. That goes both for examples in the automotive domain, and in real life when I've hit hard times. Many of my parts for the Colt came from his past builds on various Mitsubishis and Hyundais. In fact... many of my Colt parts have come from this very car. He gave this chassis to somebody, and they returned it later because life didn't let them finish it. I don't think it took even a month once he put his mind to working on it to get it in this state, and it was motorless-and-in-pieces. I can't wait to see these parts get bolted on this car. I think we'll have a new textbook definition of sleeper when he's done.


 


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More ebay 20g drag passes
Trolled by mother nature. I thought plugging in my o2 sensor might make a difference. Scarily that's not how things worked out. My fuel trims are all jacked up with or without it. Airflow counts are down. I have more to do to this thing, but in an effort to keep things real, I'm uploading what happened and what I found in the logs. The PRIMARY reason for racing is development of both self and your equipment. If your goal is to have an awesome street car, you can't fully-achieve that goal without rigorous testing where numbers and facts are clearly evident. You JUST CAN'T do that on the STREET. There are no numbers on the street, no measurement of a baseline nor any improvements you might make. There's no measurement of a drivers' skill outside of, "did you win or didn't you?" I didn't come to the track with the expectation of MY driving needing to be improved. I was simply getting numbers, so I wasn't a tree-nazi like I was in the Friday Night No-Lift-To-Shift video. There was more incentive for me to just not red-light and see what she'll do. This evening I didn't feel like the track crew were on their A-game. Sometimes they held staged cars for an inordinately long period of time... which once I'm staged, I'm on the rev limiter, and once they left me there awaiting the tree for over 20 seconds, heating my car up and leaving me disadvantaged out of the hole. Other times they treated the starting lanes, dried off my opponent's side but not mine, not giving instruction to hold or wait. In fact, one guy was signaling me forward while another crew member was standing in front of my car spraying the lane. What do you expect for only $15? I'm grateful for them, but the communication could stand improvement over what I saw tonight. Perhaps I'm just a bit miffed with my setup and looking for someone else to blame? The track officials certainly don't deserve any for how it ran this night.





Wheels, Plastidip and Mickeys
What starts as an innocent venture into wheel painting ends in a sticky, sticky episode of badassery. Plastidip is spray-on rubber. This is the first time I've ever worked with it. My review: It comes in colors but my favorite is black. It's good stuff. What I did should have had me spraying it on last... because mounting tires will remove it from a wheel. Most people doing this painted their wheels while tires were mounted. This is what happens when you don't. So what? It's spray-on rubber. Spray on some more and you're good. If you want the BEST results with it (since it can be expensive in some regions), allow no less than 10 minutes between coats, and spray LIGHT COATS. That's capitalized because squeezing out a light coat of spray-on rubber is much easier said than done. It's like lightly-spraying Silly String, or setting your fire extinguisher to "low". Or trying to bathe in a waterfall with good intentions, but getting knocked on your ass by the force of falling water instead. I'm amazed at how easy a product like this is to work with in concept. It sprays differently than paint, but its application is easily mastered once you get the feel for it. I give it... d (ツ) b





Cylinder Head 204 - Porting & Polishing
This is a first-generation 1992 1.6L Hyundai Elantra small-combustion-chamber head. Thats what it is. It's a J1 Elantra cylinder head. Good luck finding another one like it. (read more)... In Cylinder Head 106 I talked about the mainstream porting theories as they are discussed. We looked at a cylinder head that I have thousands of dollars of professional work performed on, and a bone-stock second-generation head that I didn't port. In this video I just might do something you haven't seen done before. For some, that may be uncomfortable. The port and polish job I perform here is what I think will work best for my current build. This is not an extreme killer port job. What will be different here is where port textures are concerned, I will be following the advice of a reputable source that will remain un-named. You're free to port yours differently than I do in this video, and I give you that out, around the 20 minute marker. The Hyundai is far from being an ultimate-performance build. It's a $400 box of scraps with nothing but time invested. It's perfect for this video. My finished product WILL be an improvement over what I had. I don't yet have access to a flow bench. I still have an achievement to un-lock. As far as you should be concerned with the techniques I employ... without flow numbers there is no evidence of what this will do, but we will gather lots of info from dynp sessions and drag strip time slips. If I could test it on a flow bench, I would. There are MANY, and when I say many, I mean thousands of flame war mongering pirates floating around on rough seas with a hair trigger cannon finger itching to fire if you port a head any differently than what the herd mentality says to do while porting a cylinder head. I cover the herd mentality because it has merit. It's been tested. Tried and true. But I don't follow it to the letter of the law. I'm definitely not here to de-bunk it. I would port a cylinder head differently for each build based on how that engine was used. There's an extremely valid reason why relating to air speed. It's not the texture of a port that maximizes the effect of fuel atomization, but the velocity of the air running through an x or y sized valve. The driving factor in this is the piston speed. I'm not going to give you the technical information, but will refer you to information about the Lovell factor. There's a better description of this in the links below, and even a calculator to help you find your engine's sweet spot. Why the Lovell factor is important: https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/3346/the-effect-of-valve-size Lovell gas factor calculator: http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/lovellgascalc.html Only people who have flow testing equipment know for sure what really works and have the capability to produce a perfectly-matched port job for the ultimate performance build. Those guys know the definition of ultimate, and THEY are floating below the water Aegis-class submarines ready to blow your comment up if you don't know what you're talking about. They don't care if you're an armchair mechanic or a herd of pirates. I will say, they're zoomed in pretty close on me right now, and I'm expecting to take a few hits. My work will be tested based on Dyno and drag strip performance, and the results will be posted here. Fortunately, those kinds of videos are a WHOLE LOT EASIER TO MAKE!!!





Hyundai Assembly 5 - Fighting The Valve Clearance
In previous videos I showed the 2 factors that really need to be scrutinized. Valve clearance and how you degree your camshafts. Of course we got sidetracked with plenty of other tips and tricks but I wanted to upload this video to illustrate that the process really isn't as easy as the animations, demonstrations and explanations make it look. The reasoning is sound, but the work to execute it can be very tedious. Setting up the valvetrain on this engine was very tedious. I say "was" because following this video, we can put that whole topic to bed. This is what it took. Not many people have the patience to deal with this, and I wanted to showcase here for those who are at the peak of their frustration with their builds. This kind of stuff can happen to anyone. Let my pain and suffering help you not feel so all alone. My apologies for the lack of new groundbreaking technical info. It's not a complicated task to install ARP head studs, and that was my plot twist. There are a couple of hurdles you may encounter depending on the production year of your engine, but they're well illustrated in this video. I'm not sure if their installation warrants a video all unto itself, but if you feel it does, speak up because I have 3 more engines to build. I can still do it. I just wanted to demonstrate that progress is being made on this, and despite the long breaks between uploads, a LOT is going on behind the scenes. This was 20 hours of repetitive work and I hope it's at least mildly entertaining. For me, this was the most boring video I've ever edited here because I had to re-live the same steps so many times, over and over again. I could very easily have inserted an hour of it in the wrong place and nobody would ever have known because it all looks the same. The text overlays are there only so you can be aware of what's different. A voiceover would have been pointless because the techniques illustrated are discussed ad-nauseum in the Cylinder Head 205 and 206 videos. The valve cover gasket installation process was covered in "Valve Cover Modification and Polishing", and the discussion about compression ratios is explained in "Calculate Your Compression Ratio". If you like the job the parts washer did, check out my DIY parts washer video. ;) Cylinder Head 205 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbWWCKPuZG4 Cylinder Head 206 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4s2X3VUwADA Valve Cover Modification and Polishing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NiIi9EljLSk Calculate Your Compression Ratio https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWze92nt9OU





Out with the old, in with the new.
I bet you were expecting a different car. Sorry. I didn't want to, nor did I ask to troll you with this video. It's just what it is. I set out to burn some rubber, drop some bass, and have some fun in the Hyundai... and this is what happened. Testing in this video... aside from the opening scene, I shot this video at 1080p30 using an head-mounted Sony HDR-AS30V Action Cam. The camera was contained in the incuded waterproof case because I needed to test the audio with it. It sounds great with out it. It sounds only good with it. This is a test to see how I can adjust my shooting style to add 1st-person perspective to my videos for everyone's benefit. The follow-up video will be shot entirely with the "big camera" (Canon XH-A1s)





Jamie's Boosted Hyundai Elantra (Oct '11)
This is an old video that I've decided to post practically un-edited. A few parts were skipped regarding off-topic babble in order to keep it under 10 minutes. You've seen this car in another video. There really is no way to determine how many different cars contributed to this build. Every last part on it (except the one featured in this video) was previously used on another vehicle. Absolutely nothing came new in a box. The owner put enough 4g63's together in a lifetime to have extra gaskets and seals laying around to exclusively use junkyard parts to build a whole car. In the last video, you saw me contribute all the turbo parts to this build. Used 150,000 mile old stock DSM turbo parts including a worked 14b. I'm happy to show it to you all put together. Check the other video of this car if you want more details on the engine build. None of the internals have changed.





4g63 Balance Shaft Elimination - bearing modification
This is the first part of a two part series about balance shaft elimination on 4g series engines. This video details the bearings, the other video will cover the front case modifications. I've already got a low-def video of the front case mods, and I plan to re-shoot that one in HD when I'm in the assembly phase. It's linked in the video. The balance shafts are designed to cancel out harmonic vibrations caused by combustion and the spinning rotating assembly. They may offer a greater degree of comfort to the driver and passengers, but with that comfort comes a price. Often, when a 4g63 timing belt gives up, it's because the balance shaft belt breaks or comes loose and takes the timing belt out with it. When that happens, it can total your pistons, valves, damage the crankshaft, wrist pins, timing belt tensioner and crank angle sensor. Basically, it can total your motor. The balance shafts also have a combined weigh over 10 lbs and both are driven off the timing belt making them additional and heavy rotating mass. If you've got a lightweight flywheel but still have balance shafts, you have your priorities mixed up. So here's what you do with the bearings. It's easy. You can do this at home. You CAN do it with the motor in the car, BUT DON'T. You must enjoy punishment to do this like that. The end result will slightly increase your oil pressure, but usually not enough to cause concern unless you have a full-circumference bearing turbo, ball bearing turbo--with your oil feed coming off the oil filter housing. The head feed would be better in that case because it's regulated at 15 PSI.





Hyundai Assembly 6 - Manifolds & Turbo
I love music videos. They're so much easier to narrate. I don't want to upset anyone by not providing commentary about what I'm doing or where this build is going... and this is the video where all that stuff comes together. Quite frankly, I missed you. I really enjoy these little talks we share. In this video is a little fabrication, maintenance, comparison and assembly. Un-boxings, cleanup, break-fix... Variety! You know... The stuff that keeps happening as you wrap up any build. It's not a longblock until it has manifolds, and a turbo build has a few more things than just that in order to make it complete. My attention has now turned towards preparing the chassis and accessories for installation and I promise there will be more involved videos following this one for the hardcore auto techs. Whether you're watching or wrenching on this one, all this stage does is create anxiety for wanting to hurry up and finish the install, but don't rush. Do it right! These are the non-reusable parts for the turbo install. ALL of the other part numbers in the video were shown: MF241255 x2 Oil Drain Bolts (upper) MF101229 x2 Oil Drain Bolts (lower) MF660031 x2 Oil Drain Gasket (washer) MR258477 x2 Oil Drain Gasket (flange) MF660064 x2 Oil Feed Crush Washer (turbo) MF660063 x2 Oil Feed Crush Washer (head) MF660065 x4 Coolant Crush Washer (turbo) MD132656 x4 turbo Bolt (M10 x 80 x 1.25mm) MD132933 x8 turbo Spring Washers Thank you all for keeping up with this build. Thanks especially for the kind comments and interest in this project! You guys are the best!





Why so SIRIUS? Kia 4g64?
This video assumes you're aware that various iterations of the 4g series Mitsubishi engines are designated as Sirius I & II. For detailed information about which engines qualify as which, visit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitsubishi_Sirius_engine There's also this at EvolutionM: http://forums.evolutionm.net/evo-engine-turbo-drivetrain/278462-official-hyundai-2-4l-g4js -4g64-thread.html Good luck finding info about this using Hyundai and Kia in searches. Wikipedia doesn't have any info about it grouped with the Sonatas either. There is no question what this is, well illustrated in this video. I apologize for the length of this video, but a lot of ground is covered in a short time. Hopefully there's some information in here you may someday use. I'm just trying to expose it because there doesn't seem to be any real information floating around in the forums about this yet. The car is a first-generation 1999-2005 Kia Optima sedan. It has the EVO equivalent of a 4g64 2.4L. Before using any of these parts, do your research, cross-reference your parts and know what you're getting into. Using parts from this rotating assembly in a 2g Eclipse will require aftermarket rods and/or custom pistons. This is information for those who wish to frankenstein their builds, or save a buck... whichever.... either one of those requires skill.





First ebay 20g drag passes
I made 2 passes. On the first one, nearly everything that could go wrong did. But I'm a persistent bastard. I fixed it all, found everybody and then made this run. It wasn't until after I got home that I realized I had no in-car video footage of the first run when I broke despite having set it up... I kicked the alternator belt off no-lift-to-shifting into 4th gear around 800 feet and coasted to a 13.3 at 82mph against a 10 second Mustang. Overheating with no power steering I limped it back and put the belt back on, only burning myself 9 times, and then got back out and made this run. The guys in front of us broke, too. I guess it was contagious?

This run is on 93 octane pump gas.

I shouldn't have been in such a hurry. It left me a little unprepared. You learn things about other things while doing things--is the best I can explain it. It didn't knock at all, so clearly the new injectors are working fine... but I didn't take time to burp the coolant system, so it ran hot. My alternator belt was loose, and it bailed on me. I was focusing on explaining the video (I deleted that scene from frustration) rather than putting the car back together, and failed to plug in a very important sensor. I would have caught it, but didn't get a chance to look at the logs until I got home. I have to operate so many pieces of equipment in addition to actually driving that it's very distracting.

The guy in my second race had a beautiful 1967 Dodge Dart, and he was a very good sport! It was a great race where adrenaline is involved, and I was focused but wary of whether or not the alternator belt would stay on. I really appreciate the guys that keep old muscle alive. That car's almost 50 years old. That's making history right there... He cut a great 60 foot after they cleaned up the track, but I wish that car didn't break in his lane prior to his pass if it was a problem for his run.

I tried to leave nothing out and keep it short & sweet. I was lucky to have a track-side cameraman for the second race. Thanks Taylor! Having that sensor plugged in would have left me much more confident in the log data and offer a much better assessment of this turbo, but it is what it is. Here it is...





Grinding Oil Return Channels
I started cleaning the rust out, and got carried away. I didn't want to do as extensive of a cleanup job as I did on the GSX, but still wanted to make improvements because of the kinds of oil-related problems it experienced. There's a method to this madness. It will make more sense once I get around to bolting the oil pan back on. The techniques in this video are things I had to do right now if I was going to do them at all. Some of them really needed to be done anyway. You really don't see people do these tricks on imports. Just because you don't see it, it doesn't mean it can't help. I hope you enjoyed the motor oil drag races in the middle of the video. They speak for the science behind this mod... without having to get all scientific. Those results speak clearly for themselves, and there's plenty of chances to get scientific as the Glyptal treatment of the GSX is completed. In this video... I used steel wire cup brushes for both an air DIY grinder, and a Dremel to remove the rust. I used a cone-shaped carbide double-cut burr to smooth the crankcase. I polished the crankcase with coarse and medium sanding rolls for both an air DIY grinder and a Dremel. I used a 1/4" ball carbide double-cut burr to grind the channel. I used a pack of Harbor Freight #95947 10-Piece Tube Brush Kit. http://www.harborfreight.com/10-piece-tube-brush-kit-95947.html





Hyundai Assembly 3 - Head Assembly & Specialty Tools
I have bad news. The big camera's playback heads bit the dust from extensive prolonged use. I wore out the tape drive. No manner of cleaning tapes can fix what it's been through. I've talked many times about how much footage goes into one of my 15 to 30 minute videos, and for every hour of video footage I've shot, the camera does double-duty because after shooting, it has to be played back in real time during capture. I've done more than 130 videos this way, probably over 2000 hours of use in the harshest of environments, and it just couldn't handle it any longer. I shot several more tapes beyond what's in this video that I can't even import because the play heads failed. I don't know if any of that video even stuck to the tapes? The lost footage from the last video was an early and un-recognized sign of what was soon to come. I know I joked about it, but in reality it's really not very funny at all. I can't afford a backup for a piece of equipment like this, so it's something I don't have. As bad as this news might feel to you, I feel it 21,000 times over and I mean that. This couldn't come at a worse time and expense for me, and at a point where my production was really starting to wrap up on this project to move on to bigger and better things. It's the only camera I have that can do what I do here on this channel, so I'm forced to stop production for now. Even though my camera is huge, 7 year old HDV technology, these things still sell for several thousand dollars used because they record un-compressed video unlike every other flash storage based solution available at twice the price. 3CCD 1080/60i HD cameras that shoot to tape have advantages that you can't affordably achieve with solid-state media. I have to use un-compressed footage to do what I do here or else there's nothing left of the video quality after 7 exports and a final mpeg compression. The Sony Action Cam can't do it, we learned that in a previous test video. Even if it could, it can't do close-ups and everything's fisheyed. Buying a low-end 4K camera is impractical because I can't efficiently or effectively edit that video without a $9,000 computer. Jafromobile is just not that big of a channel, and I do this completely un-sponsored and at my own expense with the help of a handful of friends who volunteer their talent, time and information. It's the epitome of low-budget and what it earns still doesn't come close covering the channel's equipment and expenses as they occur. People have urged that I do a kickstarter, but I can't bring myself to ask for that from the community. I don't sell a product or offer services so there is no profit margin. I can't accept money for something that happens only at the speed of my available resources. To me, this channel is my proverbial gift horse to all of you. http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/don't_look_a_gift_horse_in_the_mouth I know what you're thinking and I realize this is a grim conclusion to this video. It sounds like I'm down for the count, but don't rush to the down vote button just yet. As of the upload date of this video, I'm paying out of pocket to fix a ridiculously expensive 3CCD 1080HD broadcast quality video camera so that these projects can resume, and so that I can bring the final assembly steps to you in the same quality you've grown used to seeing here on Jafromobile. If I wear out a camera every 3 years, then so be it. This is love, and no expense is too great. The big camera is being fixed by its manufacturer, and I'm expecting the repair to cost as much as replacing it. I sincerely hope that's not the case. Hopefully my production only has to take a short break. Once production resumes and I can import these tapes, I've got some really awesome stuff coming up and I hope every last one of you is here to see it. I may have a few other backlogged nuggets I can upload, and as always I'm happy to discuss this in the comments and provide updates on the repair as I get them. Update: Awaiting quote due by 5/16 according to the repair agreement. 5/9/2014 9:17:00 AM DELIVERED NEWPORT NEWS, VA US 5/9/2014 5:36:00 AM DESTINATION SCAN NEWPORT NEWS, VA US 5/9/2014 12:04:00 AM ARRIVAL SCAN NEWPORT NEWS, VA US 5/12/2014 - Repair paid in full $440. Far less than I was expecting. I'm glad they still make parts for 7 year old professional equipment. Thank You Canon, USA! Repair should be complete within 7 business days from receipt of payment. The quote only took them 24 hours and they quoted a week just for the estimate, so at this rate I should be back up and running once again very soon. Thank ALL of you for your kind words, HUGE generosity, and all of the moral support. I swear I have the best subscribers on YouTube!





2g 7-bolt 4g63 Engine Removal & Disassembly
Tearing down the GSX to see what broke, and what I need to buy. Sitting for a year and letting the battery drain took a toll on the polished finish... and it looks like a piece of 4th gear wanted to take a look at the outside world. Holy transmission case, and it's off to TRE to see what's salvageable. Looks like the clutch could stand to be replaced, too. Timing belt has taken some abuse from the higher rev limit and I was expecting that. EGT probe is fried and I don't even care. Since I'm running DSMlink and can log Boost, I'm removing all my gauges anyway. Front case seal (freeze plug) is leaking a tad, and the crank seal shows signs of excessive crankcase pressure. I'm going to make some changes... I've got a lot of other tricks up my sleeve, so stay tuned.





Hyundai Assembly 9 - Airflow, Fluids, Gauges & Sensors
...and everything you ever wanted to know about the Autometer AutoGage 2391 installation. Stuff that matters. Caboose loves drill bits, there's no such thing as a clear crayon, and someone's going to comment on "pull the rubber hose" in 3...2...1... I'm finishing the whole install in this video. Well... for everything but the ECU and the Wideband sensor. No spoilers. :P Fine, I just ruined it for you. The rest of the video's in the edits and will be out soon. Those videos will be shorter, thank Dionysus! I explain everything in the video. Trust me. What's not explained in the video, I'm sure is on Wikipedia. For instance, Piet Mondrian… http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piet_Mondrian





Installing an eBay 20g
I'm reviewing an ebay 20g TD05 internally-gated turbocharger. You've seen me open it, assess it, and port it. Now I'm going to install it and see how it fits on my car. Its dimensions are close enough to a Mitsubishi turbo that it fits well, but it didn't play nice with my aftermarket stuff as the video illustrates. You'll see what I mean... The wastegate actuator nipple aims straight toward the compressor housing, and I don't like it. I fixed it with a pair of pliers and an allen wrench at 5:55 in a way that's far less likely to break it. The flanges and bolt centers lined up fine and without any issues, though others have claimed to have had them with this turbo. The compressor cover is an obvious giveaway regarding identifying this turbo. It does not wear the cast-in designation TD05H that the Mitsubishi turbos do, but for $228, what do you expect? If you chose to go this route, just manage your expectations. Be aware that it might not bolt up perfectly to your particular car, and be willing to fix what isn't perfect.





Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?




Similar 1/4 mile timeslips to browse:

1994 Hyundai Elantra GT42 Turbo: 12.201 @ 123.030
Rick Inacio, Engine: 4g63, Turbos: GT42 Tires: M/T 26


1992 Hyundai Elantra : 12.960 @ 108.420
Doug Elfman, Engine: 4g63, Supercharger: no Turbos: 14b Tires: mt street slicks


2002 Hyundai Elantra GT: 14.965 @ 96.247
Steve, Engine: 2.0l DOHC, Supercharger: na Turbos: na Tires: hankook


2003 Hyundai Elantra GLS: 15.510 @ 89.640
FordFasteRR, Engine: 2.0L Twin Cam, Tires: Yokohama AVS ES-100


2014 Hyundai Elantra GT: 16.410 @ 84.510
MT, Engine: Front Engine, FWD I-4, aluminum block/head,


2011 Hyundai Elantra Limited: 16.910 @ 84.110
ET, Engine: Dohc 16v - valve inline 4: 148 horsepower, Tires: Continental ContiProContact 215/45R-17 87H


1999 Hyundai Elantra GL: 17.343 @ 80.920
Paul,


 


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