Drag Racing 1/4 Mile times 0-60 Dyno Fast Cars Muscle Cars

Jamie's 92 Hyundai Elantra with bastard 4g63 swap

There's a history both behind this car, and the friendship with this person. I met him 10 years ago following a random conversation that I injected myself into between 2 strangers at an auto parts store. I had just bought a '92 Civic CX with crap compression and was picking up some service parts to keep it limping and useful while I built my DSM. I overheard him mention "4g63" to somebody as I walked by, so I turned around and introduced myself without any clue that he was one of the "realest" people I've ever known. What occurred for me in the following discussion was an awakening on my part. He led me to an adjacent parking lot where an un-assuming Hyundai Elantra sat. This isn't the one, but is one of many factory cars that he's swapped a 4g63 into. What he managed to get through my big thick skull was there were lots of great inconspicuous chassis that you can simply bolt a 4g63 into. Over time it became evident where you can find lots of "racing" parts, from factory equipment on various mini-vans, station wagons, much of the Hyundai line-up from '92-'95. During the "DSM Years", there were plenty of cars from other manufacturers that made dynamite donors, and this sparked my ability to be frugal in some of my ventures. If you ever meet Jamie, expect his knowledge of car parts both inside and outside the realm of Mitsubishi to be as unassuming on the surface as the car in this video. He has true talent. Finds peace and happiness in a junkyard full of decay, and skills that create useful high-performance art from what many consider rubbish. Because he's already taken time walking around with parts from one car and bolting them on to others to see if they'll fit, worked as a machinist's apprentice rebuilding everything under the sun, and done the tech work to analyze failures in all of it, he's often my go-to guy for advice when things aren't working correctly. Many times he's come through for me in a pinch and shed light on something I didn't understand. That goes both for examples in the automotive domain, and in real life when I've hit hard times. Many of my parts for the Colt came from his past builds on various Mitsubishis and Hyundais. In fact... many of my Colt parts have come from this very car. He gave this chassis to somebody, and they returned it later because life didn't let them finish it. I don't think it took even a month once he put his mind to working on it to get it in this state, and it was motorless-and-in-pieces. I can't wait to see these parts get bolted on this car. I think we'll have a new textbook definition of sleeper when he's done.


 


More Videos...


Hyundai Assembly 5 - Fighting The Valve Clearance
In previous videos I showed the 2 factors that really need to be scrutinized. Valve clearance and how you degree your camshafts. Of course we got sidetracked with plenty of other tips and tricks but I wanted to upload this video to illustrate that the process really isn't as easy as the animations, demonstrations and explanations make it look. The reasoning is sound, but the work to execute it can be very tedious. Setting up the valvetrain on this engine was very tedious. I say "was" because following this video, we can put that whole topic to bed. This is what it took. Not many people have the patience to deal with this, and I wanted to showcase here for those who are at the peak of their frustration with their builds. This kind of stuff can happen to anyone. Let my pain and suffering help you not feel so all alone. My apologies for the lack of new groundbreaking technical info. It's not a complicated task to install ARP head studs, and that was my plot twist. There are a couple of hurdles you may encounter depending on the production year of your engine, but they're well illustrated in this video. I'm not sure if their installation warrants a video all unto itself, but if you feel it does, speak up because I have 3 more engines to build. I can still do it. I just wanted to demonstrate that progress is being made on this, and despite the long breaks between uploads, a LOT is going on behind the scenes. This was 20 hours of repetitive work and I hope it's at least mildly entertaining. For me, this was the most boring video I've ever edited here because I had to re-live the same steps so many times, over and over again. I could very easily have inserted an hour of it in the wrong place and nobody would ever have known because it all looks the same. The text overlays are there only so you can be aware of what's different. A voiceover would have been pointless because the techniques illustrated are discussed ad-nauseum in the Cylinder Head 205 and 206 videos. The valve cover gasket installation process was covered in "Valve Cover Modification and Polishing", and the discussion about compression ratios is explained in "Calculate Your Compression Ratio". If you like the job the parts washer did, check out my DIY parts washer video. ;) Cylinder Head 205 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbWWCKPuZG4 Cylinder Head 206 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4s2X3VUwADA Valve Cover Modification and Polishing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NiIi9EljLSk Calculate Your Compression Ratio https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWze92nt9OU





Jamie's Boosted Hyundai Elantra (Oct '11)
This is an old video that I've decided to post practically un-edited. A few parts were skipped regarding off-topic babble in order to keep it under 10 minutes. You've seen this car in another video. There really is no way to determine how many different cars contributed to this build. Every last part on it (except the one featured in this video) was previously used on another vehicle. Absolutely nothing came new in a box. The owner put enough 4g63's together in a lifetime to have extra gaskets and seals laying around to exclusively use junkyard parts to build a whole car. In the last video, you saw me contribute all the turbo parts to this build. Used 150,000 mile old stock DSM turbo parts including a worked 14b. I'm happy to show it to you all put together. Check the other video of this car if you want more details on the engine build. None of the internals have changed.





More ebay 20g drag passes
Trolled by mother nature. I thought plugging in my o2 sensor might make a difference. Scarily that's not how things worked out. My fuel trims are all jacked up with or without it. Airflow counts are down. I have more to do to this thing, but in an effort to keep things real, I'm uploading what happened and what I found in the logs. The PRIMARY reason for racing is development of both self and your equipment. If your goal is to have an awesome street car, you can't fully-achieve that goal without rigorous testing where numbers and facts are clearly evident. You JUST CAN'T do that on the STREET. There are no numbers on the street, no measurement of a baseline nor any improvements you might make. There's no measurement of a drivers' skill outside of, "did you win or didn't you?" I didn't come to the track with the expectation of MY driving needing to be improved. I was simply getting numbers, so I wasn't a tree-nazi like I was in the Friday Night No-Lift-To-Shift video. There was more incentive for me to just not red-light and see what she'll do. This evening I didn't feel like the track crew were on their A-game. Sometimes they held staged cars for an inordinately long period of time... which once I'm staged, I'm on the rev limiter, and once they left me there awaiting the tree for over 20 seconds, heating my car up and leaving me disadvantaged out of the hole. Other times they treated the starting lanes, dried off my opponent's side but not mine, not giving instruction to hold or wait. In fact, one guy was signaling me forward while another crew member was standing in front of my car spraying the lane. What do you expect for only $15? I'm grateful for them, but the communication could stand improvement over what I saw tonight. Perhaps I'm just a bit miffed with my setup and looking for someone else to blame? The track officials certainly don't deserve any for how it ran this night.





Hyundai 1st Startup & Heat Cycle
Thank you for clicking "The Link" in the end of the previous video. On a 1st startup, there are lots of things to pay attention to. It's hard to know which one to look at first, but a good rule of thumb is to start with oil pressure and go from there. If you don't achieve a healthy oil pressure level immediately at startup, shut it down. Failure to pressurize the oil system will quickly kill all of your hard work within seconds as there are no break in lubricants available that will save you from a lack of oil pressure. The reason for this is that your rotating parts float on a cushion of oil. All your main and rod bearings do is regulate the thickness of that oil film layer. If the oil supply runs out, metal-on-metal contact begins and that continues to damage those parts until they receive oil pressure. Everything that needed to be said about the oil pump preparations was in the video. Every car with hydraulic lifters makes lots of noise on their first startup. It's just what they do. If you use a low-temperature grease to prepare your oil pump assembly, then the noise will subside faster. If you use multi-purpose brake grease like I did, then it will take until the engine is at full operating temperature and your radiator fans cut on before it melts, passes through the lifters, and stops blocking oil flow to the valve train. The lifters aren't the only source of oil for the camshafts, and a 4g63 utilizes roller rockers, so during the noisy portion of the break-in, no damage is being caused by this noise. It's just important to try to listen through it and see if there are any other kinds of knocks, squeals or bangs that are out of place. You'll see me do that quite obviously in the video. Don't try to tune or adjust things on a cold engine. Your efforts are useless until its up to its normal operating temperature because there are engine components and ECU routines that change dependent upon the engine temperature. After the engine has warmed up, set your base timing, adjust the idle speed, and then go after other factors that may affect the idle performance. You don't tune your fuel trims, ignition timing or anything else until you achieve a steady, stable, closed loop idle. Lastly, don't drive the car until it's at least idling properly. I will do 2 more heat cycles addressing bugs and tuning issues, and after the 3rd heat cycle I drive 'er around, adjust the clutch, re-torque the axle nuts and then change the oil. Thank you for following this car's build. I can't say that enough. You guys, not me, you guys make all of this possible.





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