Drag Racing 1/4 Mile times 0-60 Dyno Fast Cars Muscle Cars

Jamie's 92 Hyundai Elantra with bastard 4g63 swap

There's a history both behind this car, and the friendship with this person. I met him 10 years ago following a random conversation that I injected myself into between 2 strangers at an auto parts store. I had just bought a '92 Civic CX with crap compression and was picking up some service parts to keep it limping and useful while I built my DSM. I overheard him mention "4g63" to somebody as I walked by, so I turned around and introduced myself without any clue that he was one of the "realest" people I've ever known. What occurred for me in the following discussion was an awakening on my part. He led me to an adjacent parking lot where an un-assuming Hyundai Elantra sat. This isn't the one, but is one of many factory cars that he's swapped a 4g63 into. What he managed to get through my big thick skull was there were lots of great inconspicuous chassis that you can simply bolt a 4g63 into. Over time it became evident where you can find lots of "racing" parts, from factory equipment on various mini-vans, station wagons, much of the Hyundai line-up from '92-'95. During the "DSM Years", there were plenty of cars from other manufacturers that made dynamite donors, and this sparked my ability to be frugal in some of my ventures. If you ever meet Jamie, expect his knowledge of car parts both inside and outside the realm of Mitsubishi to be as unassuming on the surface as the car in this video. He has true talent. Finds peace and happiness in a junkyard full of decay, and skills that create useful high-performance art from what many consider rubbish. Because he's already taken time walking around with parts from one car and bolting them on to others to see if they'll fit, worked as a machinist's apprentice rebuilding everything under the sun, and done the tech work to analyze failures in all of it, he's often my go-to guy for advice when things aren't working correctly. Many times he's come through for me in a pinch and shed light on something I didn't understand. That goes both for examples in the automotive domain, and in real life when I've hit hard times. Many of my parts for the Colt came from his past builds on various Mitsubishis and Hyundais. In fact... many of my Colt parts have come from this very car. He gave this chassis to somebody, and they returned it later because life didn't let them finish it. I don't think it took even a month once he put his mind to working on it to get it in this state, and it was motorless-and-in-pieces. I can't wait to see these parts get bolted on this car. I think we'll have a new textbook definition of sleeper when he's done.


 


More Videos...


Cylinder Head 204 - Porting & Polishing
This is a first-generation 1992 1.6L Hyundai Elantra small-combustion-chamber head. Thats what it is. It's a J1 Elantra cylinder head. Good luck finding another one like it. (read more)... In Cylinder Head 106 I talked about the mainstream porting theories as they are discussed. We looked at a cylinder head that I have thousands of dollars of professional work performed on, and a bone-stock second-generation head that I didn't port. In this video I just might do something you haven't seen done before. For some, that may be uncomfortable. The port and polish job I perform here is what I think will work best for my current build. This is not an extreme killer port job. What will be different here is where port textures are concerned, I will be following the advice of a reputable source that will remain un-named. You're free to port yours differently than I do in this video, and I give you that out, around the 20 minute marker. The Hyundai is far from being an ultimate-performance build. It's a $400 box of scraps with nothing but time invested. It's perfect for this video. My finished product WILL be an improvement over what I had. I don't yet have access to a flow bench. I still have an achievement to un-lock. As far as you should be concerned with the techniques I employ... without flow numbers there is no evidence of what this will do, but we will gather lots of info from dynp sessions and drag strip time slips. If I could test it on a flow bench, I would. There are MANY, and when I say many, I mean thousands of flame war mongering pirates floating around on rough seas with a hair trigger cannon finger itching to fire if you port a head any differently than what the herd mentality says to do while porting a cylinder head. I cover the herd mentality because it has merit. It's been tested. Tried and true. But I don't follow it to the letter of the law. I'm definitely not here to de-bunk it. I would port a cylinder head differently for each build based on how that engine was used. There's an extremely valid reason why relating to air speed. It's not the texture of a port that maximizes the effect of fuel atomization, but the velocity of the air running through an x or y sized valve. The driving factor in this is the piston speed. I'm not going to give you the technical information, but will refer you to information about the Lovell factor. There's a better description of this in the links below, and even a calculator to help you find your engine's sweet spot. Why the Lovell factor is important: https://www.highpowermedia.com/blog/3346/the-effect-of-valve-size Lovell gas factor calculator: http://www.rbracing-rsr.com/lovellgascalc.html Only people who have flow testing equipment know for sure what really works and have the capability to produce a perfectly-matched port job for the ultimate performance build. Those guys know the definition of ultimate, and THEY are floating below the water Aegis-class submarines ready to blow your comment up if you don't know what you're talking about. They don't care if you're an armchair mechanic or a herd of pirates. I will say, they're zoomed in pretty close on me right now, and I'm expecting to take a few hits. My work will be tested based on Dyno and drag strip performance, and the results will be posted here. Fortunately, those kinds of videos are a WHOLE LOT EASIER TO MAKE!!!





Out with the old, in with the new.
I bet you were expecting a different car. Sorry. I didn't want to, nor did I ask to troll you with this video. It's just what it is. I set out to burn some rubber, drop some bass, and have some fun in the Hyundai... and this is what happened. Testing in this video... aside from the opening scene, I shot this video at 1080p30 using an head-mounted Sony HDR-AS30V Action Cam. The camera was contained in the incuded waterproof case because I needed to test the audio with it. It sounds great with out it. It sounds only good with it. This is a test to see how I can adjust my shooting style to add 1st-person perspective to my videos for everyone's benefit. The follow-up video will be shot entirely with the "big camera" (Canon XH-A1s)





New Year's Eve Hyundai Teardown
It goes like this. One of the best friends I've ever had built this car from junk parts. He said it best, "it was built from literally a box of scraps". It ran an 13.2 in the quarter mile using no aftermarket performance parts of any kind. That quarter mile time was limited by traction. I know this car had more in it, but I never managed to get it to stick before encountering this. More on this build... The proper bolts were not always available, but the builder knows isht from Shinola. Even though this engine defies all engineering logic from Mitsubishi, the builder knew what would work and what would not. Budget was of the most primary of his concerns, and it shows at every turn, and it's what brought us to the kind of failure we find in this video. I asked him what bearings he used. He said, "...the least expensive ones I could find. Picture Aluglides. Now picture generic Aluglides. I paid half-as-much for those bearings as I would for generic Aluglides. Bolt too long? Put a nut on it and shorten it. Oil pan too close to the pickup? Hammer a big dent in it to make clearance for it. Wrong water pipe? Put a brass hardware store tee in the line to tap a turbo coolant feed. Forget buying ARP's, this is an all-standard re-used factory fastenere'd no-oil-squirter .030"-overbore 6-bolt with the cut-off balance shaft mod. It's using a small combustion chamber head off of a 1.6L Mirage with a 2.0L non-turbo block. The plug wires are used. The radiator hoses were used. Everything but the head gasket came from a junk car. The FWD turbo gearbox is from my 150,000 mile old Plymouth Laser that donated the block to the Colt. This is one of the most amusing cars I've ever wrapped my fingers around because of these kinds of character-building attributes. Nevermind that the chassis has less than 70,000 miles on it (not bad for a '92), it's just that it's built without using any new parts. Parts were substituted when they were not available, and it's ridiculously powerful. Thank you Jamie. You discovered your answer. I'm happy to help. I'll be changing some things like the oil pan bolts, bearing quality, some of the plumbing and fixing a few wiring harness problems, but I'm not changing anything else if I can avoid it. This car was never intended to have anything upgraded to deliver raw power, and I'll do my best to keep it that way, replacing and restoring what failed so that we can keep pushing these generic non-turbo .030" over pistons to the limit. Apparently, 24 PSI from a 14b is not enough. In the meantime, my diagnosis is that excessive oil pressure lead to the breakdown of the #1 bearing. After all, it's the 1st bearing in-line in the oil system on the main gallery. It's the most isolated from clutch harmonics, yet it was the one that spun. The #1 bearing supplies the oil pump. The teardrop on the head is nearly gone from head resurfacing, and this is a no-balance-shaft no-oil-squirter block. I think high oil pressure is why it falls on its face above 6000 rpms. There's a restriction upstream from the lifters and they deflate at high RPMs, losing lift. I'll fix it. I've got the parts.





More ebay 20g drag passes
Trolled by mother nature. I thought plugging in my o2 sensor might make a difference. Scarily that's not how things worked out. My fuel trims are all jacked up with or without it. Airflow counts are down. I have more to do to this thing, but in an effort to keep things real, I'm uploading what happened and what I found in the logs. The PRIMARY reason for racing is development of both self and your equipment. If your goal is to have an awesome street car, you can't fully-achieve that goal without rigorous testing where numbers and facts are clearly evident. You JUST CAN'T do that on the STREET. There are no numbers on the street, no measurement of a baseline nor any improvements you might make. There's no measurement of a drivers' skill outside of, "did you win or didn't you?" I didn't come to the track with the expectation of MY driving needing to be improved. I was simply getting numbers, so I wasn't a tree-nazi like I was in the Friday Night No-Lift-To-Shift video. There was more incentive for me to just not red-light and see what she'll do. This evening I didn't feel like the track crew were on their A-game. Sometimes they held staged cars for an inordinately long period of time... which once I'm staged, I'm on the rev limiter, and once they left me there awaiting the tree for over 20 seconds, heating my car up and leaving me disadvantaged out of the hole. Other times they treated the starting lanes, dried off my opponent's side but not mine, not giving instruction to hold or wait. In fact, one guy was signaling me forward while another crew member was standing in front of my car spraying the lane. What do you expect for only $15? I'm grateful for them, but the communication could stand improvement over what I saw tonight. Perhaps I'm just a bit miffed with my setup and looking for someone else to blame? The track officials certainly don't deserve any for how it ran this night.





Wheels, Plastidip and Mickeys
What starts as an innocent venture into wheel painting ends in a sticky, sticky episode of badassery. Plastidip is spray-on rubber. This is the first time I've ever worked with it. My review: It comes in colors but my favorite is black. It's good stuff. What I did should have had me spraying it on last... because mounting tires will remove it from a wheel. Most people doing this painted their wheels while tires were mounted. This is what happens when you don't. So what? It's spray-on rubber. Spray on some more and you're good. If you want the BEST results with it (since it can be expensive in some regions), allow no less than 10 minutes between coats, and spray LIGHT COATS. That's capitalized because squeezing out a light coat of spray-on rubber is much easier said than done. It's like lightly-spraying Silly String, or setting your fire extinguisher to "low". Or trying to bathe in a waterfall with good intentions, but getting knocked on your ass by the force of falling water instead. I'm amazed at how easy a product like this is to work with in concept. It sprays differently than paint, but its application is easily mastered once you get the feel for it. I give it... d (ツ) b





Hyundai Assembly 5 - Fighting The Valve Clearance
In previous videos I showed the 2 factors that really need to be scrutinized. Valve clearance and how you degree your camshafts. Of course we got sidetracked with plenty of other tips and tricks but I wanted to upload this video to illustrate that the process really isn't as easy as the animations, demonstrations and explanations make it look. The reasoning is sound, but the work to execute it can be very tedious. Setting up the valvetrain on this engine was very tedious. I say "was" because following this video, we can put that whole topic to bed. This is what it took. Not many people have the patience to deal with this, and I wanted to showcase here for those who are at the peak of their frustration with their builds. This kind of stuff can happen to anyone. Let my pain and suffering help you not feel so all alone. My apologies for the lack of new groundbreaking technical info. It's not a complicated task to install ARP head studs, and that was my plot twist. There are a couple of hurdles you may encounter depending on the production year of your engine, but they're well illustrated in this video. I'm not sure if their installation warrants a video all unto itself, but if you feel it does, speak up because I have 3 more engines to build. I can still do it. I just wanted to demonstrate that progress is being made on this, and despite the long breaks between uploads, a LOT is going on behind the scenes. This was 20 hours of repetitive work and I hope it's at least mildly entertaining. For me, this was the most boring video I've ever edited here because I had to re-live the same steps so many times, over and over again. I could very easily have inserted an hour of it in the wrong place and nobody would ever have known because it all looks the same. The text overlays are there only so you can be aware of what's different. A voiceover would have been pointless because the techniques illustrated are discussed ad-nauseum in the Cylinder Head 205 and 206 videos. The valve cover gasket installation process was covered in "Valve Cover Modification and Polishing", and the discussion about compression ratios is explained in "Calculate Your Compression Ratio". If you like the job the parts washer did, check out my DIY parts washer video. ;) Cylinder Head 205 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbWWCKPuZG4 Cylinder Head 206 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4s2X3VUwADA Valve Cover Modification and Polishing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NiIi9EljLSk Calculate Your Compression Ratio https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWze92nt9OU





Hyundai Elantra 4g63 Shortblock Assembly
HOLD ON TIGHT! HERE WE GO! We begin the blueprint and assembly on my 1992 Hyundai Elantra's bastardized 4g63. The parts used in this are from a mash of different brands and models outside of the typical 2.0L 4g63, but the specs and standards I am following for its assembly are for the 2.0L DOHC. If you want to follow along in your service manual to verify what I've done here in this video, the processes we cover here detail pages 11C-95 through 11C-105 of the 1g Overhaul manual. I would prefer you not rip them from the binding and throw them away, relying only on this video for instruction... but rather use this video as a motivational guide, and as a demonstration of the techniques involved in those sections. You gotta do the cooking by the book. I never had any intention of making instructional videos on this particular car, but after it blew up I slowly realized it's actually a better case study for how a 4g63 ticks than anything else in my driveway. There are several reasons for this. One being that it's a mix of parts that shouldn't be bolted together, and the other is that many of you watching my videos aren't trying to build a 600hp engine out of aftermarket parts. You're trying to put back together what used to be your daily driver. This car covers those bases. Don't think for a second I won't go through this same trouble and level of detail for the GSX. I will. When I do, having this information in this video will give you a better understanding on how and why I do things the way I do when I get there. This was the shortest I could condense this video. I've never uploaded a video this long, and I hope I never have to do it again. It took a month to create on cutting-edge equipment, 16 hours to export, and 9 hours for YouTube to process. My script for the voiceover is 6 times longer than the whole script for the movie Pootie Tang. 6 times. Longer. Than a Hollywood movie.





Grinding Oil Return Channels
I started cleaning the rust out, and got carried away. I didn't want to do as extensive of a cleanup job as I did on the GSX, but still wanted to make improvements because of the kinds of oil-related problems it experienced. There's a method to this madness. It will make more sense once I get around to bolting the oil pan back on. The techniques in this video are things I had to do right now if I was going to do them at all. Some of them really needed to be done anyway. You really don't see people do these tricks on imports. Just because you don't see it, it doesn't mean it can't help. I hope you enjoyed the motor oil drag races in the middle of the video. They speak for the science behind this mod... without having to get all scientific. Those results speak clearly for themselves, and there's plenty of chances to get scientific as the Glyptal treatment of the GSX is completed. In this video... I used steel wire cup brushes for both an air DIY grinder, and a Dremel to remove the rust. I used a cone-shaped carbide double-cut burr to smooth the crankcase. I polished the crankcase with coarse and medium sanding rolls for both an air DIY grinder and a Dremel. I used a 1/4" ball carbide double-cut burr to grind the channel. I used a pack of Harbor Freight #95947 10-Piece Tube Brush Kit. http://www.harborfreight.com/10-piece-tube-brush-kit-95947.html





Hyundai Assembly 6 - Manifolds & Turbo
I love music videos. They're so much easier to narrate. I don't want to upset anyone by not providing commentary about what I'm doing or where this build is going... and this is the video where all that stuff comes together. Quite frankly, I missed you. I really enjoy these little talks we share. In this video is a little fabrication, maintenance, comparison and assembly. Un-boxings, cleanup, break-fix... Variety! You know... The stuff that keeps happening as you wrap up any build. It's not a longblock until it has manifolds, and a turbo build has a few more things than just that in order to make it complete. My attention has now turned towards preparing the chassis and accessories for installation and I promise there will be more involved videos following this one for the hardcore auto techs. Whether you're watching or wrenching on this one, all this stage does is create anxiety for wanting to hurry up and finish the install, but don't rush. Do it right! These are the non-reusable parts for the turbo install. ALL of the other part numbers in the video were shown: MF241255 x2 Oil Drain Bolts (upper) MF101229 x2 Oil Drain Bolts (lower) MF660031 x2 Oil Drain Gasket (washer) MR258477 x2 Oil Drain Gasket (flange) MF660064 x2 Oil Feed Crush Washer (turbo) MF660063 x2 Oil Feed Crush Washer (head) MF660065 x4 Coolant Crush Washer (turbo) MD132656 x4 turbo Bolt (M10 x 80 x 1.25mm) MD132933 x8 turbo Spring Washers Thank you all for keeping up with this build. Thanks especially for the kind comments and interest in this project! You guys are the best!





First ebay 20g drag passes
I made 2 passes. On the first one, nearly everything that could go wrong did. But I'm a persistent bastard. I fixed it all, found everybody and then made this run. It wasn't until after I got home that I realized I had no in-car video footage of the first run when I broke despite having set it up... I kicked the alternator belt off no-lift-to-shifting into 4th gear around 800 feet and coasted to a 13.3 at 82mph against a 10 second Mustang. Overheating with no power steering I limped it back and put the belt back on, only burning myself 9 times, and then got back out and made this run. The guys in front of us broke, too. I guess it was contagious?

This run is on 93 octane pump gas.

I shouldn't have been in such a hurry. It left me a little unprepared. You learn things about other things while doing things--is the best I can explain it. It didn't knock at all, so clearly the new injectors are working fine... but I didn't take time to burp the coolant system, so it ran hot. My alternator belt was loose, and it bailed on me. I was focusing on explaining the video (I deleted that scene from frustration) rather than putting the car back together, and failed to plug in a very important sensor. I would have caught it, but didn't get a chance to look at the logs until I got home. I have to operate so many pieces of equipment in addition to actually driving that it's very distracting.

The guy in my second race had a beautiful 1967 Dodge Dart, and he was a very good sport! It was a great race where adrenaline is involved, and I was focused but wary of whether or not the alternator belt would stay on. I really appreciate the guys that keep old muscle alive. That car's almost 50 years old. That's making history right there... He cut a great 60 foot after they cleaned up the track, but I wish that car didn't break in his lane prior to his pass if it was a problem for his run.

I tried to leave nothing out and keep it short & sweet. I was lucky to have a track-side cameraman for the second race. Thanks Taylor! Having that sensor plugged in would have left me much more confident in the log data and offer a much better assessment of this turbo, but it is what it is. Here it is...





Jamie's Boosted Hyundai Elantra (Oct '11)
This is an old video that I've decided to post practically un-edited. A few parts were skipped regarding off-topic babble in order to keep it under 10 minutes. You've seen this car in another video. There really is no way to determine how many different cars contributed to this build. Every last part on it (except the one featured in this video) was previously used on another vehicle. Absolutely nothing came new in a box. The owner put enough 4g63's together in a lifetime to have extra gaskets and seals laying around to exclusively use junkyard parts to build a whole car. In the last video, you saw me contribute all the turbo parts to this build. Used 150,000 mile old stock DSM turbo parts including a worked 14b. I'm happy to show it to you all put together. Check the other video of this car if you want more details on the engine build. None of the internals have changed.





Hyundai Assembly 4 - Balancing Rods
I edited this video to its finished state, and RojoDelChocolate handed me a track with no collaboration that was the right length and rhythm. I literally did nothing to the video once the audio track was dropped in, and that's just how it went. I can't believe it. It's like when you're pumping gas into a Ford F150 full-blast and release the pump handle to stop right on $80.00 even. He's got more musical talent in his pinky fingernail than I have mechanical ability in my spleen, appendix and tonsils combined. Thank you RojoDelChocolate. Here I'm cleaning up the fly cuts, balancing the piston and rod assemblies and preparing to double-check my valve clearance. I had to start by cleaning up and re-lubricating every part that was removed to prevent contamination of the assembly. This is the tedious part of doing the job right. We learned that this whole engine assembly was pretty far-gone in previous videos, way past its service limits, so making it fit and work again takes extensive testing, machining, and re-testing to ensure all of the parts fit. This is likely the most challenging build I will perform on any car in my driveway. It has been so far. But because I have not demonstrated the basics of engine balancing beyond what a machine shop has to do to zero balance a flat-plane crankshaft, I thought I'd give it its own video right here with one of the test assemblies. When you balance rods by themselves, you balance the big-end and the pin-bore separately. You get weights of both ends of the rod using a jig and a process that I don't demonstrate in this video. The reason you do this is because the position of the weight behaves differently relative to its distance from the crankshaft pin. Weight on the big end has less of an effect than if there's extra weight on the pin bore. The best balanced engines have every part of the piston and rod assemblies balanced separately within .1 grams using the method I just described, and not the method shown in this video. The method shown here involves weighing ALL of the piston and rod assembly components together, and then taking out the difference just on the casting lines of the connecting rod. They were already off-balance and had never been balanced before. This is an improvement, not perfection. It's still something this engine needed to have done. I'm not using the big-end/small-end method here because these pistons are pressed-on and if I try to remove them from the rod, it will shatter the piston skirts. No thank you. I'm not replacing these pistons. The reason I grind down the casting lines is because it's weight is in a neutral territory, extending from the big end to the small end. It's easier to take an even amount off when you grind across the entire length of the rods. This method leaves a lot up to assumption as there's no way to determine which end of the rod is heavier, or if the weight is in a wrist pin or piston. All this does is ensure the crankshaft is spinning an even amount of weight on all 4 of its rod journals. Grams of weight turn into pounds of force at idle speeds. My goal is to remove that vibration at any and all rotations per minute if I can. So I make them all the same within 1.0 grams of their combined weight. If you're assembling and balancing all NEW parts, not parts that have worn together and need to go back in the same holes... you will have to balance the individual parts and pieces. This is the poor man's method. Even with the new parts you still do the poor man's method once you're done balancing the individual parts and assemble them, but sometimes when you're lucky with the new parts, you can just swap around the rods, pins and fasteners to balance the weights on each assembly and not have to grind anything at all. That's awfully nice when that happens. You know the Hyundai won't let me get away with that. Removing stress risers might help strengthen the rods, but it's not what I'm after here or else I would have removed the whole casting line from all of them. These rods should be fine for my goals. My goal is to remove just enough from all of the fatter rods (weight wise) to match the lightest one. Balancing an inline 4 engine with a flat-plane crank is easy if you have already balanced the crankshaft. This crank was already balanced for the GSX motor on a previous occasion. It's zero'd out. In order to balance the rotating assembly, all you do is make the piston and rod assemblies weigh identically to its neighbors. Just 3 grams of weight can produce over a hundred pounds of lateral forces at red-line so this is an aspect of engine building that you should not overlook. All you need to do is get all of them within 1 gram. The scale I'm using measures whole grams, so that's all I can do anyway. This method is acceptable for balancing a rotating assembly as long as you're smart about how to remove the weight.





Hyundai 4g63 Assembly Part 2
Continued progress on the Hyundai build. I've covered most of this before in detail, so I'll save you the fancy narrative. The torque settings are in both the info below, and the video shown on the wrench. You will see this process again here, and each time new aspects of assembly tools and materials will be used. SPECIAL THANKS TO ROJODELCHOCOLATE for the audio track. Oil Pan Bolts 18 7 M6 x12 5'lbs MD012109 2 7 M6 x8 5'lbs MD167134 (some cars use 10mm shorties but 8mm will work) 1g Front Case Bolts qty/GR/DIA/length/torque/part# 4 7 M8 x20 17'lbs MF140225 1 7 M8 x25 17'lbs MF140227 1 7 M8 x40 17'lbs MF140233 1 4 M10 x30 22'lbs MF140062 (6-bolt) 1 7 M8 x40 17'lbs MF140233 (7-bolt) 1g oil pump housing bolts 5 4 M8 x20 12'lbs MF140025 (4qty for 7-bolt and add 1 MD141302 screw) 1 10 M8 x16 27'lbs MD040758 (Balance/Stub shaft bolt) Oil Pump Sprocket Nut 1 11 M10 x 40'lbs MD095237 *use Loctite 1g oil filter housing bolts (that I used w/6-bolt water-cooled OFH) 2 7 M8 x40 14'lbs MF241261 1 7 M8 x20 14'lbs MF140225 1 7 M8 x55 14'lbs MF241264 1 7 M8 x65 14'lbs MF241266 1g Rear Main Seal Housing Bolts 5 7 M6 x16 10'lbs MF140205 (6-bolt) 5 7 M6 x14 10'lbs MF140204 (7-bolt) 1g Timing Tesnsioner Bolts 2 7 M8 x51 17'lbs MD129350 (6-bolt) 2 7 M8 x55 17'lbs MD190987 (7-bolt) 1g Timing Tensioner Arm Bolt 1 8 M8 x16 16'lbs MF241251 Bolt 1 x x x x MD129421 Washer Flywheel bolts 6 11 M12 x22.5 98'lbs MD040557* (ALL Manual transmission 6-bolt cars) 7 11 M12 x21.5 98'lbs MD302074 (ALL Manual transmission 7-bolt turbos) * Part substitution # 2795A956 Crank Sprocket Bolt & Washer 1 11 M14 x40 87'LBS MD074255 CRANKSHAFT CENTER BOLT 1 x M14 x14.5 MD012455 CRANKSHAFT WASHER For gasket, seal and service parts information, please refer to my 6-bolt 4g63 shortblock rebuild parts video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ofWnFXkix3w For timing belt service parts information and tools, please refer to my 4g63 Timing Belt Parts video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BN7TOVrkUNQ In 29 and 3/4 minutes I offer a detailed explanation of how to do a 6-bolt AND 7-Bolt 4g63 Front Case & Oil Pump Rebuild: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPhyazI1fYc For 33 minutes I cover every oil filter housing including servicing information, rebuilding, modifying the oil filter housing, and the unabridged description of how oil pressure works in my 4g63 Oil Filter Housings video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X88tw1UFs_M





Jafro's Hyundai Elantra Surprise
There are some things you can't put a price on. I'm not just talking about the Hyundai. I'm talking about Jamie. I have the best friends in the world. Look what Jamie just did for all of your entertainment. He literally donated it to me to play with on this channel. This isn't just for me. Think about it. It's the only FWD DSM in my driveway, and the only one I'm likely to have. With this combination of parts, I could not have a greater challenge making this car stick. Because right now it doesn't at all. Torque steer ends at about 5700 RPMs in third gear. Boost is instantaneous. This car could never make good use of any larger of a turbo. I'm convinced with the right combo of tricks to gain timing and tweaks to make it stick, and that it will run deep into the 12's just like it is. This car is a kick in the pants to drive. A rolling burnout. Be careful with that downshift.





lancer evo build 4g63





Which car is faster? Which Car is Faster?




Similar 1/4 mile timeslips to browse:

1994 Hyundai Elantra GT42 Turbo: 12.201 @ 123.030
Rick Inacio, Engine: 4g63, Turbos: GT42 Tires: M/T 26


1992 Hyundai Elantra : 12.960 @ 108.420
Doug Elfman, Engine: 4g63, Supercharger: no Turbos: 14b Tires: mt street slicks


2002 Hyundai Elantra GT: 14.965 @ 96.247
Steve, Engine: 2.0l DOHC, Supercharger: na Turbos: na Tires: hankook


2003 Hyundai Elantra GLS: 15.510 @ 89.640
FordFasteRR, Engine: 2.0L Twin Cam, Tires: Yokohama AVS ES-100


2014 Hyundai Elantra GT: 16.410 @ 84.510
MT, Engine: Front Engine, FWD I-4, aluminum block/head,


2011 Hyundai Elantra Limited: 16.910 @ 84.110
ET, Engine: Dohc 16v - valve inline 4: 148 horsepower, Tires: Continental ContiProContact 215/45R-17 87H


1999 Hyundai Elantra GL: 17.343 @ 80.920
Paul,


 


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