Toyota GT 86 vs AE86 review - Auto Express

We bring the Toyota GT 86 face-to-face with the eighties thriller to see if it lives up to the legend. Read more: http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/toyota/gt-86/59795/toyota-ae86-vs-gt-86 Subscribe to Auto Express Magazine and get 6 issues for £1 plus a free gift: http://subscribe.autoexpress.co.uk/yt

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Subaru WRX STi vs Audi S3 Saloon
Does the new Subaru WRX STi live up to its predecessors - and can it match the new Audi S3 Saloon? Subscribe to our YouTube channel http://bit.ly/11Ad1j1 Subscribe to the mag http://subscribe.autoexpress.co.uk/yt The Subaru WRX STi and Audi S3 Saloon may not seem like obvious rivals, but both have the same power output and distant rally heritage to call upon for their performance kudos. At £33,245 with a six-speed manual gearbox, the Audi S3 is more expensive than the Subaru, but the £28,995 WRX clearly doesn't have the premium badge and upmarket cabin of its Audi rival. With 407Nm, the Subaru has a fraction more torque than the 380Nm Audi, but it's where that torque arrives that really makes the difference. In the Subaru you've got to wait until 4,000rpm to get peak torque, whereas in the punchy Audi it arrives at just 1,800rpm. These cars have got very different characters. There was a time when we thought the new WRX wasn't going to come to the UK but fast Subaru fans can relax - it's finally here. In an age when cars are accused of all looking and feeling the same, there's no doubting that a WRX doesn't feel or look like anything else on the road. Performance car fans will forgive the Subaru's cabin because this car is all about the driving experience and if you've driven a WRX before then this new car will feel very familiar. First of all the boxer engine sounds the same, you've got that unique sound from about 4,000rpm as you start to work it hard. You've got a gearbox that's got quite a short shift on each change, with a slightly notchy, quite mechanical feel, and the steering is very fast but at the same time quite light - which can be a bit disconcerting. It's also got quite aggressive self-centring, but once you get used to it you realise that that's a contributing factor to what makes this car feel so agile. This is a car that you really will enjoy on the average British road. The first thing you notice is when you get into the Audi S3 is the upmarket interior is in a different league to the Subaru. It's a real contrast to the dated cabin of the Subaru. The driving experience is completely different, too. Where the Subaru is really vigorous all the time, the Audi is very relaxed: it drives like any other well-sorted fast Audi. But the performance is there: it's got the same power as the Subaru's engine. In the Audi you've got really instant power all the time so you don't feel like you've got to work the engine so hard. And the handling's pretty accomplished as well. The steering's not as sharp and the way that the diffs work is not as aggressive but there's plenty of traction, decent body control and the car turns in nicely. It's not a thrilling car on a road like this but it's just very accomplished. Off the line, both cars have superb traction, but the Audi is nearly 100Kg lighter than the Subaru, and that shows by the time we reach 60mph. The S3 punches to 60 in 5.4 seconds, whereas the Subaru is 2 tenths behind at 5.6 seconds. So which car comes out on top in our test? Well, Subaru fans will love the sound of the WRX's boxer engine and the car's unique character. But the Audi has a much nicer cabin, it was faster in the drag race and it's a nicer car to live with day-to-day. Yes, it's more expensive, but if you want a fast, comfortable and stylish performance saloon, the Audi S3 is the one for us.





Nissan Juke-R vs GT-R track test - Auto Express
We pit the new Nissan Juke-R against the GT-R Subscribe to our YouTube channel http://bit.ly/11Ad1j1 Subscribe to the mag http://subscribe.autoexpress.co.uk/yt





Lamborghini Aventador vs Ferrari FF Drag Race
It's not uncommon for us to drag race cars on a runway. But we've never done it at an active airport with passenger jets taking off and landing in the background. And so we leapt at the chance to take part in Race the Runway at Edinburgh Airport. The event, sponsored by Mercedes, was held to raise money for the Prince and Princess of Wales Hospice and the Scottish Burned Children's Club. In total 25 cars, ranging from a Lamborghini Aventador to a TVR Tuscan, took part. Entrants were timed over a 1,350-metre course on one of the taxi runways. We would be driving an SLS GT, which, at 199mph, has the highest top speed of any current production Mercedes. So how did it fare against the competition? Watch the video and find out. The cars included: Lamborghini Aventador Ferrari FF Porsche 911 turbo (997) Lamborghini Gallardo Spyder Mercedes SL63 AMG Performance Mercedes SLS GT Nissan Skyline R33 GT-R Mercedes E63 AMG S BMW M6 BMW M3 GTS Audi RS6 (MkI) TVR Tuscan Ferrari 599 GTB HGTE Subscribe to our YouTube channel http://bit.ly/11Ad1j1 Subscribe to the mag http://subscribe.autoexpress.co.uk/yt





Lamborghini Huracan review
The Lamborghini Huracan is a glorious fusion of modern technology and old-school Lamborghini theatrics. Read the full review here: http://bit.ly/1q9R6iW Subscribe to our YouTube channel http://bit.ly/11Ad1j1 Subscribe to the mag http://subscribe.autoexpress.co.uk/yt The new Lamborghini Huracan LP6104 has a big task on its hands. Not only must it beat the Ferrari 458 and the McLaren 650S, it needs to outperform the Gallardo - the car it replaced - in the showroom, as the Gallardo was the manufacturer's best-selling model ever, with 14,000 sold over a 10-year career. Happily, the Lamborghini Huracan gets off to the best possible start. Perhaps the design is a little conservative by Lamborghini's standards, but in the flesh, the aggressive proportions, aggressive front end and floating C-Pillar push all the right buttons. Like in the Lamborghini Aventador, the interior of the Huracan pays homage to fighter jets, with a flip-up ignition switch, angles everywhere and a new cockpit-like 12.3-inch digital instrument display behind the wheel that can be configured in a variety of ways. The Lamborghini Huracan also gets a whole range of brand-new technologies. For starters, there's this all new chassis which is made from a combination of aluminium and carbon fibre. This makes the Huracan not only 10 per cent lighter than the Gallardo, but also 50 per cent stiffer. There are also new three-stage adaptive dampers, as well as a variable ratio electro-mechanical steering system that varies the ratio on how quick you're driving. A new electronically controlled four-wheel drive system can send up to 70 per cent of the power to the Huracan's rear-wheels in normal driving, and up to 100 per cent when you really need it. Most importantly on the new Lamborghini Huracan, though, is a new, seven-speed twin-clutch box that shouldn't feel like you're getting kicked in the head every time you change gear. Rather than downsizing or turbocharging, Lamborghini has stuck to its guns by using a developed version of the Gallardo's naturally aspirated 5.2-litre V10. The Lamborghini Huracan gets stop-start and a few other tweaks to make it a little bit cleaner, but most importantly, it's now got 602bhp and 560Nm of torque. It'll do 0-60 in 3.2 seconds and it has a top-speed of 202mph. The Lamborghini Huracan's acceleration is pretty vivid. Perhaps it doesn't quite have the free-revving nature of a Ferrari 458 or the turbocharged hit of a McLaren 650S, but it's definitely lost none of the aural drama that the Gallardo had. The biggest change here with the Lamborghini Huracan, though, is its breadth of abilities. It has something called the 'Anima' switch, meaning it has three driving modes. In 'Strada' mode, it softens the suspension and dials back the ferocity of the steering, the gearbox and the throttle. 'Sport' mode is somewhat of an interim mode and it's pretty good for fast-driving on road. But since we're testing the Lamborghini Huracan at the amazing Ascari circuit in Spain, it would be a shame if we didn't go for the full-fat 'Corsa' mode. Fling it into a corner and the steering is quite light, but it's absolutely pin-sharp. In terms of feel, it's a bit like a Ferrari 458 and you can feel the variable ratio really helping you out, meaning there's no full-opposite lock. The carbon ceramic brakes on the Lamborghini Huracan are standard-fit now, and they're absolutely brutal in the way they stop the car. With the four-wheel drive system, there's also tonnes of grip. However, if you provoke the Huracan a bit, you can get it to act a bit like a rear-wheel drive car. Perhaps it's not as lairy as the Gallardo used to be - that used to like to gets its tail out at the slightest provocation - but you can still have some fun with this thing and feel it moving underneath you. The tech used in the Huracan can also make a pretty average driver look pretty spectacular. The question is though, is do you actually want a Lamborghini that flatters you and covers up all your driving mistakes? Some will say that a Lamborghini should scare the life out of you and your passenger. Then it should spit you into a hedge when you're not at the top of your game. But, we'd disagree because the new Huracan is a glorious fusion of modern electronics and old-school theatrics. If you want something that drives like a pig and breaks-down every five minutes, you can always take your £186,000 and spend it on something from Lamborghini's back catalogue.




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