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How to Diagnose Car Battery and Starter Problems

Watch more How to Make Simple Car Repairs videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/394209-How-to-Fix-a-Car-Window Use these tips to diagnose your car's battery and starter problems. Step 1: Turn on your ignition Turn on your ignition if your car engine won't turn over. Listen carefully to any sound produced. Step 2: Consider a dead battery Consider the possibility of a dead battery. If trying to start the engine only produces a "click" sound, this may be the case. If you left your car lights on the night before, the battery could have gone dead, and you'll need to have the battery jump-started. If the battery is very old you may have to get a new one. Tip Car batteries typically only last 3 to 5 years. Step 3: Consider a possible alternator problem Consider a possible alternator problem if turning on the ignition produces a whining sound, but you have a newer battery. If the alternator is bad, it will not charge the battery when you drive the car. You can use jumper cables and another battery to start the car, but the same problem will occur again. Have the alternator checked and replaced if necessary. Step 4: Consider a possible starter problem Consider a possible starter problem. If you hear a click when you turn on the ignition and the problem is not due to your battery, the starter's solenoid may have a weak spot inside. If so, the starter will not be able to produce enough current to start your engine, and you will have to have it replaced. Step 5: Visit a mechanic Visit a mechanic if you're having trouble determining the sound your car is making. It's always better to be safe than sorry! Did You Know? The Oxford Electric Bell, a battery-powered bell at the University of Oxford in England, has been ringing almost continuously since 1840.


 


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How to Fix a Car Starter
Watch more How to Make Simple Car Repairs videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/399329-How-to-Fix-a-Leaky-Sunroof Before you look under the hood, check out these tips for fixing a faulty car starter. Warning Working with jacks and electrical motors can be dangerous. To avoid injury, use caution and make sure the vehicle is stable before you work on it. Step 1: Rule out other causes Rule out other possible causes of the problem first, such as a faulty battery, gears, or the key connection. Tip If you hear the starter motor working well when you turn the key, the problem probably lies elsewhere. But a click, grind, silence, or weak sound may indicate a faulty starter. Step 2: Get to the starter Locate the starter either under the hood or from underneath. If you need to jack up the car to get to it, secure the car high up enough to slide under it and work. Step 3: Tap it Gently tap the starter cylinder with a wrench and test the ignition system to see if that solves the problem. Step 4: Label wires Label both sides of the wires connecting to the starter with masking tape, so you can put it back together properly later. Tip Consult the detailed repair manual for your car for tips on getting to and removing the starter. Step 5: Remove starter Remove the starter motor by unhooking the cables that connect to the battery and removing the bolts from the top and bottom with a ratchet and wrench set. Tip Most auto parts stores can test the starter at little or no cost to confirm your diagnosis. Step 6: Inspect the starter Inspect the starter for obvious damage to help determine whether the problem is in the motor or with the piece that is supposed to engage the flywheel. Step 7: Clean and reattach Fix any apparent problems, such as a jam or loose cable; then reattach the starter. If it still does not work, you probably need to buy a new one to replace it with. Either way, your vehicle will thank you. Did You Know? The first electrical starter system for cars was invented in 1911 by Charles Kettering.





How to Clean Car Battery Terminals
Watch more How to Take Care of Your Car videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/399309-How-to-Change-Your-Cars-Headlight If your car battery is corroded, not enough electricity can be passed to the terminals and through the cables to power your car's electrical system for optimum performance. You can clean away corrosion with a few simple steps. Step 1: Rinse and scrub the terminals Rinse the battery terminals with a solution of one heaping tablespoon baking soda to 1 pint water, and then thoroughly scrub the terminals and around the base of the posts with an old toothbrush. Step 2: Dry the battery Dry the battery and terminals with a clean towel, making sure to wipe away residue and corrosion around the terminals. Step 3: Remove battery terminals Loosen the nut on each cable clamp and remove the terminals from the posts by twisting and pulling them off. Tip Remove the terminal from the negative post, marked with a minus sign, first. Then remove the terminal from the positive post, marked with a plus sign. Step 4: Inspect the cables and clamps Inspect the cables for excessive wear and corrosion, and inspect the battery and terminals for damage. If there is excessive damage, replace the parts or the battery to avoid future problems. Step 5: Clean the terminals Insert the end of the battery brush into the terminals and rotate it back and forth until the inside of each terminal is uniformly shiny and all of the grease, dirt, and corrosion is scrubbed away. Tip Since battery brushes are conical and terminals are different sizes, you may have to flip the terminal over to effectively clean the other side. Step 6: Clean the posts Push the open end of the battery brush over each post and rotate it back and forth for about a minute, or until the posts are uniformly shiny and all of the grease, dirt, and corrosion is brushed away. Step 7: Clean the battery Pour more of the baking soda and water solution over the top of the battery, wipe it down with a clean rag, and then dry it off with the towel. Then reattach the terminals to the posts, starting with the positive cable. Step 8: Perform regular maintenance Perform regular battery maintenance, checking for corrosion several times a year, to ensure your electrical system stays in good working order and you don't get stranded. Did You Know? A car battery contains 18 pounds of lead and one pound of sulfuric acid.





How to Push-Start a Car with a Dead Battery
Watch more Driving & Car Safety videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/268779-How-to-React-When-the-Oil-Light-Is-On Left your lights on at the mall again? Here's how to get your car started without the use of jumper cables. Step 1: Turn ignition on Turn your ignition to the "on" position. Step 2: Engage clutch; put into gear Press the clutch firmly to the floor and put the car into gear. Tip First or second gear will work, but try second gear to reduce the jolt when the vehicle starts. Step 3: Push car Have your friend or friends push the car until you have achieved a speed of five to 10 miles per hour. Tip Let your friends know when you are about to pop the clutch so that they can get out of the way. Step 4: Release clutch Release the clutch pedal slowly. Tip Don't be afraid to give the engine a little gas at this stage, but not too much. Step 5: Drive Drive for a short distance after you feel the car start; just to make sure that the vehicle is actually running. Don't forget to go back for your friends. Did You Know? On average there is over 3,000 feet of wiring in every car.





How to Disconnect a Car Battery
Watch more How to Make Simple Car Repairs videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/239661-How-to-Replace-a-Reverse-Light It's important to learn to disconnect a car battery, because if you need to work on your vehicle, you don't want to risk electrocution. Step 1: Find the negative Find the negative terminal on the top of the battery. It's usually covered with a black cap, but if not you should be able to find a small minus sign near it or on the top of the connector. Tip The positive terminal usually has a red cap or a plus sign in case you're unsure which is which. Step 2: Choose a socket size Figure out what socket size you need to loosen the nut on the negative connector in order to disconnect the battery. Step 3: Put together the socket wrench Put the correct sized socket on the socket wrench. You may need to use a socket extender to be able to properly reach the nut on the connector. Step 4: Loosen the nut Loosen the nut on the negative terminal by placing the socket onto the nut and turning the nut counter-clockwise. It should take only a few turns to loosen. Step 5: Disconnect the negative connector Disconnect the negative connector once the nut is loosened by pulling it off. Set it aside, away from the battery. Step 6: Disconnect the positive connector Loosen the nut on the positive terminal and disconnect it from the battery. Remove the battery, being careful not to let the positive terminal touch any metal part of the car. Did You Know? Almost 99 million wet-cell lead-acid car batteries are manufactured every year.





How to Test and Troubleshoot a Starter Problem
Car won't start? Don't pay a mechanic! Learn how to diagnose an automobile no-start condition by performing simple battery load and voltage drop tests using a multimeter, plus tips and advice for all levels of auto repair experience, including DIY. Sponsored by BBB Industries - makers of premium alternators and starters that meet or exceed OE form, fit and function. http://www.BBBind.com Related Videos... How to Remove & Replace a Starter: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwdtfOAwGcQ How to Use a Multimeter to Troubleshoot Common Problems: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDy9-lGNeQM How to Properly Shim a Starter: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cYqrKmVECY Detailed white paper on heat soak condition: http://tinyurl.com/heatsoak Eric the Car Guy is an ASE-certified Master Technician based in Cincinnati, Ohio.





Diagnosing Starter Problems- EricTheCarGuy
Visit me at: http://www.ericthecarguy.com/ Once again I team up with BBB Industries to bring you the basic steps in starter diagnosis. If you suspect a bad starter you might want to run through these checks before you commit to get a new one, you just may find that you don't need a starter but rather some other issue is causing the no start. http://www.bbbind.com/ --- Click below and Stay Dirty Visit me at EricTheCarGuy.com http://ericthecarguy.com/ Visit EricTheCarGuy Forum http://www.ericthecarguy.com/forum/default.aspx Visit my Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/EricTheCarGuy --- Stay dirty ETCG Due to factors beyond the control of EricTheCarGuy, it cannot guarantee against unauthorized modifications of this information, or improper use of this information.  EricTheCarGuy assumes no liability for property damage or injury incurred as a result of any of the information contained in this video. EricTheCarGuy recommends safe practices when working with power tools, automotive lifts, lifting tools, jack stands, electrical equipment, blunt instruments, chemicals, lubricants, or any other tools or equipment seen or implied in this video.  Due to factors beyond the control of EricTheCarGuy, no information contained in this video shall create any express or implied warranty or guarantee of any particular result.  Any injury, damage or loss that may result from improper use of these tools, equipment, or the information contained in this video is the sole responsibility of the user and not EricTheCarGuy.





How To Test Your Car Starter
In this video, you will learn how to test your starter real simple before taking your starter to the auto parts. you will learn all three steps: Solenoid, Motor and Overide Clutch testing. the goal of this video is for you to understand the function of the different elements that make up the starter and to help you diagnose starting problems with a more accurate approach. video done by Jesus Cabrera of Chabot College MCOM 61.





Bad Battery or Bad Alternator, how to tell the difference (Brief Version) - Auto Information Series
This video will briefly explain how to tell if you have a bad auto battery or bad alternator. How to repair your alternator: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T9koQlrsYLU





No Crank, No Start Diagnosis - EricTheCarGuy
Visit me at http://www.ericthecarguy.com/ Whenever you have a no start condition when attempting to start your vehicle it's important to make the distinction between "no crank, no start" and "crank, no start" situations as they are treated differently. This video covers what I do when confronted with a 'no crank, no start' situation and in this case it's a worst case scenario so be sure to watch till the end. Starter diagnosis video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RKjdnQ0sHQc No start basics video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FBUYs539cy4 Parasitic draw video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KF1gijj03_0 --- Click below and Stay Dirty Visit me at EricTheCarGuy.com http://ericthecarguy.com/ Visit EricTheCarGuy Forum http://www.ericthecarguy.com/forum/default.aspx Visit my Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/EricTheCarGuy --- Stay dirty ETCG





How To Perform a Parasitic Draw Test - EricTheCarGuy
http://www.ericthecarguy.com/ This video has been a long timing coming and is one of the most requested things I get is about batteries going dead overnight so I'm very happy to finally bring you this video about the process of finding a parasitic draw which is a small drain on a battery above 50ma when the vehicle is shut off. Once you find the right fuse(s) the next step is to trace the components involved in that circuit till you find the source of the draw, you first start with a wiring diagram to give you an idea of where to start looking and then start unplugging things in that circuit to isolate the cause, it's quite scientific really a simple process of elimination. Here is a link to BBB's site that you can use to look up wiring diagrams for your application. http://www.bbbind.com/tech_database.html Good luck and if you have anymore questions check the database on my website and if you don't find what you're looking for there then post your question to my forum, here's a link. http://www.ericthecarguy.com/forum/default.aspx --- Click below and Stay Dirty Visit me at EricTheCarGuy.com http://ericthecarguy.com/ Visit EricTheCarGuy Forum http://www.ericthecarguy.com/forum/default.aspx Visit my Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/EricTheCarGuy --- Be safe, have fun, and stay dirty ETCG Due to factors beyond the control of EricTheCarGuy, it cannot guarantee against unauthorized modifications of this information, or improper use of this information.  EricTheCarGuy assumes no liability for property damage or injury incurred as a result of any of the information contained in this video. EricTheCarGuy recommends safe practices when working with power tools, automotive lifts, lifting tools, jack stands, electrical equipment, blunt instruments, chemicals, lubricants, or any other tools or equipment seen or implied in this video.  Due to factors beyond the control of EricTheCarGuy, no information contained in this video shall create any express or implied warranty or guarantee of any particular result.  Any injury, damage or loss that may result from improper use of these tools, equipment, or the information contained in this video is the sole responsibility of the user and not EricTheCarGuy.





How to Tell if Your Car Battery is Really Bad with Kent Bergsma: Battery Clinic Part 3
Watch Kent's complete Car Battery Clinic Series: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtRKk64pu2wrnK0uW_n2ubDHVdviYunPg Have you been told you need a new battery or have been having dead or weak battery problems. Don't just run out and buy a new battery until you watch Kents series on battery charging and testing. In part 3 of this series, Kent walks you through testing the battery in one of his personal Mercedes that has been showing recent signs of weakness. You will be surprised to see the results and find out why Kent is so excited about some of the newer style battery testers on the market today.





Fixing A Car That Does Nothing When You Turn The Key
Scotty Kilmer, mechanic for the last 46 years, shows how to fix a car that does nothing when you turn the key and try to start it up. Once you know what to look for, it's often easy to fix. And, If you like my car help, be sure to watch my live car talk show every Saturday morning at 10 AM CST on YouTube. I answer your car questions LIVE there. Just check it out at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VognjkYaMjg&list=UUuxpxCCevIlF-k-K5YU8XPA&f eature=c4-overview . And remember, every TUESDAY I upload a new video, so don't miss them.





How To Charge & Test Your Car Battery - AutoZone Car Care
http://www.autozone.com/autozone/parts/Battery/_/N-acy27 In the third installment of the AutoZone Complete Car Care - Starting and Charging Series, Bruce Bonebrake shows how to charge and test your auto battery.





car starting problems:battery corrosion
having trouble with your car not starting!maybe the battery has corrosion on it. a how to on solving the corrosion problem. battery terminal tool $3 felt and battery gel $1.29 bottom of coke while stuck in nowheresville.....priceless! yes i said counterclockwise,but i meant clockwise,duh on my part :)





How to diagnose a bad starter, ignition, neutral safety switch!
The re are 3 wires or electrodes on all starters. One is the large bolt that is attached to the main positive battery cable. One is the small wire that is sometimes purple that is attached to the ignition switch "key". And one is just a copper wire or electrode that supplies a ground/power to the starter from the solenoid.





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