Chasing Corvette scca vintage racing E type.

Got a good start. then chased down big block Corvette at Sebring. In my 1966 4.2L Jaguar Etype.

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Welk Vintage 67 Jaguar E-type Sprint Race Watkins Glen International 9/7/2013 Part 1
67 E-type Jaguar Races SVRA Vintage Grand Prix At Watkins Glen International





SVRA Watkins Glen Group 6 Race, Corvette, Mustang, Jaguar, Camaro, Porsche
This is an edit from the Sunday Group 6 Feature race. I am making a movie all about Vintage Racing and this is a race I collected footage from.





E Type Jaguar vs Corvette Stgingray
Just in case you haven't had enough of British cars, we're gonna keep it goin...but this time we're comparing the E-type Jaguars with the America's flagship sports car, the Corvette Stingray...Let's take a look. The E-type Jaguar originally came with a 3.8 liter, 3-carborator version of the world renowned XK engine, delivering two hundred and sixty-five brake horsepower and achieving a top speed of a hundred and fifty miles an hour. It was the first Jaguar sports car with independent rear suspension -- together with inboard disk brakes. The sleek, elegant body was a refinement of the Malcolm Sayer design D-type shape. Early models can be identified by welded-up hood-lubers and flat-floor interiors, which provided less space but more cache. The 3.8-liter engine model had to make due with the rather slow-moving moss gearbox. But when the 4.2 model arrived, an all- synchromesh box was added, as were improvements to the breaks with more trust-worthy power assistance. The cooling system was also upgraded but the tradeoff was that the 4.2 version engine was not as free revving as the 3.8 model. The interior of the 4.2 got reclining seats to replace the thinly covered but comfortable buckets and the trunk-lid had 4.2 added to the jewelry to make it more noticeable. As the E type evolved from the Series One to the Series Two in the late 60s, it gained some features and lost others. First to go were the distinctive but inefficient headlight covers and the lights themselves were moved forward. The center nuts for the wire wheels lost their spinners for safety reasons. A series two E type is also identifiable from behind -- the thin delicate rear lights of the earlier versions gave way to the larger lights placed under the full-width bumper. The Exhaust pipes were also spread further apart. Under the hood, the series two underwent further changes. Gone were the polished alloy cam covers and twin Stromberg carbs. The interior was equipped with rocker switches instead of the previous toggle switches, once again in the interest of safety. But what was lost in cosmetics for the series two was gained in drivability. The notorious cooling problems of the early E types were now well on the way to being solved. And the brakes were much improved. But whether a series one or a series two, the 6-cylinder Jaguar XKE represents one of the all-time highs in automotive design and performance. Two years after Jaguars landmark achievement, the Chevrolet division of General Motors delivered a classic of its own -- the all-new Corvette Stingray. Though perhaps not as sophisticated a design as the Jaguar, it had three hundred and twenty-seven cubic inches and available fuel injection. By 1967, the Vette could be had with a mean motor, to give it a straight-line performance edge over almost anything else on the road. So which was the better car...you decide. But one thing is for sure; both the Jaguar XKE and the Corvette Stingray answer the question...what is a sports car.





Limerock Vintage Corvette 2nd Practice Session
Sept 4, 2009 Seven Corvettes practice at the Limerock, CT 27th Annual Vintage Festival. Two 1965, two 1967, two 1969 and one 1970 fo battle with McLaren, Lotus, Jaguar, Ferrari, Paw-sha, Ford GT40, Cobra and a gaggle of Rustangs. Watch the White 1967 convertible # 57 as he was practicing to ther limit. DocRebuild.com at work. It's a hoy, smoky, smelly, dirty job, but somebody/s gotta do it.




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