Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG--D&M Motorsports Test Drive Review 2012 Chris Moran

An in-depth review of Mercedes' newest world-class supercar, the 2011 Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG. Hosted by Chris Moran. SEE OVER 100 IN-DEPTH AUTO REVIEWS @ www.SUPERCARNETWORK.com. It's five and a half feet long. It weighs 8.8 pounds. Height of an adult female, weight of a gallon or so of gas—these are the critical dimensions of the carbon-fiber driveshaft running between the engine and the rear-mounted transaxle in the new Mercedes SLS AMG. We note this here because, despite the car's retro-gullwing looks, the SLS is utterly bleeding edge—both in terms of its technical attributes and what it represents for Mercedes' in-house tuner. It is not simply a Mercedes with bigger wheels and a breathed-upon V-8 or V-12. It is, down to its churning carbon-fiber core, AMG's first dedicated automobile and the very antithesis of the overly complex and overweight half-million-dollar Mercedes SLR McLaren. "The SLS is a serious super sports car," says AMG chief of development Tobias Moers before taking a shot at the SLR, a carbon-fiber-bodied car that still managed to weigh in at 3858 pounds. "Our SLS weighs only 3572 pounds," he says, nearly 300 pounds lighter than the McMerc. Keeping the 182.6-inch-long, two-seat SLS's mass in check is its entirely aluminum construction (save for that driveshaft and steel A-pillars), a first for Mercedes-Benz. The aluminum structure weighs just 531 pounds, Mercedes says. The most distinctive aspect of the SLS's appearance is, of course, its roof-hinged gullwing doors, an homage to the iconic 300SL Gullwing. But AMG personnel took pains to point out that the doors are the only thing the SLS has in common with the 300SL. "We do not build a retro car at all!" AMG boss Volker Mornhinweg explains sharply. "In fact, we think it is the most advanced super sports car you can buy today." Those gullwing doors look spectacular. Unlike with the original SL, where one had to slide over a wide sill because of the space-frame structure underneath, it's easy to access the SLS's cabin. There's only one issue: Riders need long arms to reach the distant handles at the bottom of each door to pull them closed. The interior is simple and uncluttered, much like a current SL roadster's. While the car's structure is a pure AMG design, most of the parts, except for the shifter, are from the Mercedes bin. The instrument cluster is clear and easy to read, and we love the round HVAC vents. The center console has an aluminum finish, with carbon fiber an option. Press the starter button on the center console, and the now-familiar, AMG-designed 6.2-liter V-8 awakens with an angry yelp. The idle is deep, and the revs rise and fall race-car swiftly. Code-named M159, the engine is basically a reengineered version of the M156 unit that's fitted to AMG's "63" models. The M159 comes with an all-new magnesium intake, forged pistons in place of cast ones, and optimized tubular Exhaust headers. The engineers also switched from a wet sump to a dry arrangement, allowing the engine to be mounted lower to benefit the SLS's center of gravity. The maximum output of 563 horsepower is delivered at 6800 rpm, and peak torque of 479 pound-feet comes at 4750 rpm. In order to satisfy emissions standards—EU5, LEVII, ULEV—the Bosch ME 9.7 AMG engine management is set up to recharge the battery during deceleration. It's another way of trying to eke out decent fuel economy, which, based on Mercedes' European estimates, should equate to roughly 13 mpg city and 20 highway. -Car and Driver, November 2009

More Videos...


1930 Ford Model A T-Bucket Hot Rod-D&M Motorsports Video Walk Around and Review with Chris Moran
An outrageous 1930 Ford Model A Custom Street Rod, offered by D&M Motorsports. Hosted by Chris Moran. The Ford Model A of 1927--1931 (also colloquially called the A-Model Ford or the A, and A-bone among rodders and customizers[1]) was the second huge success for the Ford Motor Company, after its predecessor, the Model T. First produced on October 20, 1927, but not sold until December 2, it replaced the venerable Model T, which had been produced for 18 years. This new Model A (a previous model had used the name in 1903--1904) was designated as a 1927 model and was available in four standard colors, but not black. By 4 February 1929, one million Model As had been sold, and by 24 July, two million.[2] The range of body styles ran from the Tudor at US$500 (in grey, green, or black)[2] to the Town Car with a dual cowl at US$1200.[3] In March 1930, A sales hit three million, and there were nine body styles available.[2] The Model A was produced through 1931. When production ended in March, 1932, there were 4,849,340[citation needed] Model As made in all styles. Its successor was the Model B, which featured an updated 4-cylinder engine, followed by the Model 18 which introduced Ford's new Flathead V8 engine. Prices for the Model A ranged from US$385 for a roadster to $1400 for the top-of-the-line Town Car. The engine was a water-cooled L-head 4-cylinder with a displacement of 201 cu in (3.3 l). This engine provided 40 horsepower (30 kW). Typical fuel consumption was between 25 and 30 mpg (U.S.) (8 to 12 kilometres per litre or 8-9 L/100 km)[citation needed] using a Zenith one-barrel up-draft[citation needed] carburetor,with a top speed of around 65 mph (104 km/h). It had a 103.5 in (2,630 mm) wheelbase with a final drive ratio of 3.77:1. The transmission was a 3-speed sliding gear manual unit with a 1-speed reverse. The Model A had 4-wheel mechanical drum brakes. The 1930 and 1931 editions came with stainless steel radiator cowling and headlamp housings. The Model A came in a wide variety of styles: Coupe (Standard and Deluxe), Business Coupe, Sport Coupe, Roadster Coupe (Standard and Deluxe), Convertible Cabriolet, Convertible Sedan, Phaeton (Standard and Deluxe), Tudor Sedan(Standard and Deluxe), Town Car, Fordor (2-window) (Standard and Deluxe), Fordor (3-window) (Standard and Deluxe), Victoria, Station Wagon, Taxicab, Truck, and Commercial. The Model A was the first Ford to use the standard set of driver controls with conventional clutch and brake pedals; throttle and gearshift. Previous Ford models used controls that had become uncommon to drivers of other makes. The Model A's fuel tank was located in the cowl, between the engine compartment's fire wall and the dash panel. It had a visual fuel gauge, and the fuel flowed to the carburetor by gravity. In cooler climates, owners could purchase an aftermarket cast iron unit to place over the Exhaust manifold to provide heat to the cab. A small door provided adjustment of the amount of hot air entering the cab. Model A was the first car to have safety glass in the windshield. The Soviet company GAZ, which started as a cooperation between Ford and the Soviet Union, made a licensed version of the Model A from 1932-1936.[4] This itself was the basis for the FAI and BA-20 armored car, which saw use as scout vehicles in the early stages of World War II. In addition to the United States, Ford made the Model A in plants in Argentina, Canada, France, Germany and the United Kingdom. In Europe, where cars were taxed according to engine size, Ford equipped the Ford Model A with a 2,033 cc motor providing a claimed output of just 40 hp.[5] However, the engine size was still large enough to equate to a fiscal horsepower rating of 24 hp and attracted a punitive annual car tax levy of £24 in the UK and similar penalties in other principal European markets,[6] leaving the car unable to compete in the newly developing mass market. It therefore was expensive to own and too heavy and thirsty to achieve volume sales, but also too crude to compete as a luxury product. European manufactured Model As failed to achieve the sales success in Europe that would greet their smaller successor on the assembly lines in England and Germany.[5] Historical context of Model A development





Here's Why the Mercedes SLS AMG Is Worth $185,000
GO READ MY COLUMN HERE: http://autotradr.co/Oversteer THANKS TO EXCLUSIVE AUTO GROUP! http://www.exclusiveautomotivegroup.com/ The Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG hasn't really lost any value since it first went on sale. How could this possibly be? Why is it still worth $185,000? I tested one to find out. FOLLOW ME! Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/ddemuro Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/dougdemuro Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/dougdemuro





To London For My First Mercedes SLS AMG!
Before heading to Hong Kong I make a stop in London to catch up with my friend Chris and experience his Mercedes SLS AMG... ► Subscribe to My Channel Here: http://bit.ly/1Q2RWK4 You can check out more of my octane filled days here: http://instagram.com/MrJWW http://facebook.com/MrJWW http://twitter.com/MrJWW





IDIOTAS CON MERCEDES BENZ
SUSCRIBETE PARA MÁS VÍDEOS.




Follow